The Atlantic

Your Smart Toaster Can’t Hold a Candle to the Apollo Computer

Despite what everyone says about the power of modern devices, they’re nowhere near as capable as the landmark early NASA system.
Source: AP

Editor's Note: This article is part of a series reflecting on the Apollo 11 mission, 50 years later.


Without the computers on board the Apollo spacecraft, there would have been no moon landing, no triumphant first step, no high-water mark for human space travel. A pilot could never have navigated the way to the moon, as if a spaceship were simply a more powerful airplane. The calculations required to make in-flight adjustments and the complexity of the thrust controls outstripped human capacities.

The Apollo Guidance Computer, in both its guises—one on board the core spacecraft, and the other on the lunar module—was a triumph of engineering. Computers had been the size of rooms and filled with vacuum tubes, and if the Apollo computer, at 70 pounds, was not exactly miniature yet, it began “the transition between people bragging about.

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