The New York Times

Don't Scoff at Influencers. They're Taking Over the World.

ANAHEIM, Calif. — When the first TikTok star is elected president, I hope she will save some room in her Cabinet for older and more conventional bureaucrats, even if they don’t have millions of followers, great hair or amazing dance moves.

I say “when,” not “if,” because I just spent three days at VidCon, the annual social media convention in Anaheim, hanging out with a few thousand current and future internet celebrities. And it’s increasingly obvious to me that the teenagers and 20-somethings who have mastered these platforms — and who are often dismissed as shallow, preening narcissists by adults who don’t know any better — are going to dominate not just internet culture or the

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