Los Angeles Times

John Tanton, quiet architect of America's modern-day anti-immigrant movement, dies at 85

For the past two years, Virginia-based immigration attorney Hassan Ahmad has fought the University of Michigan in court to unseal the personal papers of a small-town ophthalmologist named John Tanton so that all Americans can learn about his legacy.

Instead of making his mark in the medical field, Tanton became the unlikely architect of the modern-day anti-immigration movement in the United States through founding and funding propositions, nonprofits, activists and publications on a local and national level over the past 40 years.

The proposals championed by Tanton's network - end birthright citizenship, drastically reduce legal immigration, build a wall on the U.S-Mexico border, criminalize

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times4 min readPolitics
Portland Tries To 'Keep Weird' As Another Far-right Vs. Anti-fascist Faceoff Unfolds
PORTLAND, Ore. - Far-right demonstrators declared victory in Portland on Saturday - as did masked anti-fascist counter-protesters, the mayor and even a third group dressed as dinosaurs and bananas - after dueling rallies gave extremists the national
Los Angeles Times6 min readPolitics
Japan, Korea And The Messy Question Of How To Pay For Historic Wrongs
She was just 13 in 1945 when she was forced to toil for months in a factory servicing the desperate last gasp of Japan's war effort. Today, Kim Jeong-ju can point to many culprits to blame. There was the elementary school teacher who lied and told he
Los Angeles Times4 min readPolitics
Rep. Tlaib Rejects Israel's Offer To Visit Relatives, Citing 'Oppressive Conditions'
JERUSALEM - Israel reversed itself, again, on Friday in announcing that Democratic Rep. Rashida Tlaib could visit, but only to see her grandmother. Tlaib said: No thanks. The Michigan congresswoman said Israel's decision to admit her to the country o