India Today

From the Editor-in-Chief

India Today Editor-in-Chief Aroon Purie talks about the legacy of the grand old Congress and questions whether the party can survive the exile in the wilderness after two consequent defeat in the Lok Sabha elections.

Every revolution, they say, carries the seed of its own destruction. That seems to apply to India's Grand Old Party too, the Indian National Congress, which once delivered us from colonial rule. I believe the seed was sown when India's legendary prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, made his daughter Indira Gandhi the president of the Congress in 1959. Ironically, he was the main reason why India remained a democracy unlike many other countries that were freed from colonial rule. Even such a staunch democrat could not resist the pull of dynasty. After Prime

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