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A Young Jeffrey Epstein Made An Impression On His High School Students

Former students at the Dalton School in Manhattan remember Epstein as a young, charismatic teacher. More than four decades later, Epstein stands accused of sexually abusing dozens of underaged girls.
The New York Times first reported last week that eight former Dalton students said the way Jeffrey Epstein interacted with teenage girls had stuck with them since high school. Last week, Epstein was charged with sex trafficking of minors. Source: Patrick McMullan

Most former Dalton School students agree on at least one thing: Jeffrey Epstein was charismatic.

"If you had had him [as a teacher] then, you would've liked him, too," says Eve Scheuer Lubin, who was Epstein's student during his brief tenure as a teacher in the mid-70s. The Dalton School, where he taught, is a private school in Manhattan with a reputation for attracting talented students and affluent parents.

Decades later, Epstein is known for having friends in high places — from Washington to Hollywood. Now he's in jail, awaiting trial on allegations that he sexually abused dozens of underaged girls.

Beyond the charisma, former students paint divergent portraits

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