Los Angeles Times

Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon. Who will be the first woman?

Fifty years after a military test pilot made the first striated boot prints in the thick gray powder of the lunar surface, NASA has an ambitious plan to send humans back to the moon by 2024.

But this time there's a twist.

The next time a pair of astronauts set foot on the moon, the space agency has vowed that at least one of them will be a woman.

"I think most women would say it's about time," said former astronaut Janet Kavandi, director of NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. "Women have been in the astronaut corps for decades now. We've gone everywhere else our male counterparts have gone."

NASA is so serious about sending a woman to the moon that it has named its new lunar program Artemis. In Greek mythology, Artemis is the goddess of the moon and twin sister

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times3 min readPolitics
Commentary: Executions Are The Public's Business, And They Shouldn't Be Done In The Shadows
As opposition to the death penalty has grown in recent years, some execution states (including California under Proposition 66) have gone to great lengths to protect their sordid practice in part by trying to hide exactly what it is they are doing. A
Los Angeles Times2 min read
Fed Is Expected To Cut Interest Rates Again By Quarter Point
WASHINGTON - The Federal Reserve on Wednesday is poised to cut interest rates for a second straight time, but the big question is: How many more rate reductions is the central bank prepared to make in coming months? The Fed shaved a quarter point fro
Los Angeles Times3 min read
AT&T Under Pressure To Sell DirecTV Amid Heavy Subscriber Losses
LOS ANGELES - Telecommunications giant AT&T is facing mounting pressure from an activist shareholder to pare down its operations by unloading the El Segundo-based satellite television giant DirecTV, which has been reeling from the loss of millions of