The Atlantic

Why Kobe Mourning Is So Intense

His flaws and failures as a player were both real and inextricable from his inspiring achievements.
Source: Ringo H.W. Chiu / AP Images

My generation of sports fans learned early that the athletes we idolized were neither immortal nor invincible. I was 11 when Magic Johnson, my childhood hero, announced that he was retiring from the NBA after testing positive for HIV, then a seeming death sentence. Within a few years, Bo Jackson had suffered a career-ending injury, Mike Tyson had been convicted of rape, and O. J. Simpson was on trial for double murder.

These were humans, not superheroes. My friends and I all knew that by 1996, when Kobe Bryant, the first NBA superstar who was about our age, joined the league out of high school. Skipping college was so anomalous back then that lots of skeptics characterized Kobe as arrogant. I never doubted Kobe’s decision any more than he doubted the shots that he took as an immature rookie. And today, as fans celebrate a Hall of Fame career while mourning the death of the 18-time all-star, his daughter, and seven others in a helicopter crash, it is easy to think of all his basketball successes as foreordained and his on-court failures too inconsequential to dwell on. But to ignore

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic5 min read
Where Bernie Fails the Progressive Purity Test
The senator from Vermont’s record on guns is once again under attack as he hopes to solidify his front-runner status.
The Atlantic3 min read
What Nonvoters Want
Senator Bernie Sanders is now the front-runner in the Democratic primary. As he has risen in the polls, so has a theory about elections: The key to a progressive victory is motivating previous nonvoters to show up at the polls. “To defeat Donald Trum
The Atlantic15 min read
Venezuela Is the Eerie Endgame of Modern Politics
Citizens of a once-prosperous nation live amid the havoc created by socialism, illiberal nationalism, and political polarization.