TIME

How Black Lives Matter is changing Black History Month

FRESHMAN YEAR CAN MAKE ANYONE FEEL UNSETTLED, BUT Seattle teen Janelle Gary felt especially lost when she entered high school in 2015. At home, she watched a wave of gentrification drive change in the historically black Central District neighborhood, and at school, where she was one of the few students of color in an honors history class, she felt as if black perspectives were also in the minority.

Looking back at that time, as an 18-year-old first-year student at Central Washington University, she feels her teacher was “tiptoeing” around hard race-related questions about history. But things were different in her ethnic-studies class, where her teacher Jesse Hagopian remembered what it was like to be the only black kid in a class.

That memory is part of the reason Hagopian, 41, and other educators, inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement,

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from TIME

TIME14 min read
The Equalizers
SPEAKING UP FOR THE POOR FOR 27 YEARS, THE REV. WILLIAM J. BARBER II HAS been the pastor at a church in the small city of Goldsboro, N.C. But on a recent afternoon, he could be found at a hotel in Raleigh, about an hour away from home. His work as an
TIME3 min read
Ready, Player One? 2020 Promises Swan Songs
By this time next year, a devoted gamer may well have a shiny new console hooked up to the TV: upgrades to Sony’s PlayStation and Microsoft’s Xbox are expected for the 2020 holiday season. But cry not for the PlayStation 4 or Xbox One—the best games
TIME3 min read
Q+A: Bryan Stevenson
Reforming criminal justice has growing bipartisan support. President Trump signed a law in 2018 that, among other things, offers exceptions to mandatory minimums and reduces crack sentences. What do you make of it? I don’t think most people understan