NPR

New Study Estimates More Than 900,000 People Have Died Of COVID-19 In U.S.

The total, estimated by researchers at the University of Washington, is 57% higher than the official death toll. Worldwide, they said, COVID-19 deaths are nearing 7 million, twice the official total.
Medical workers wait to vaccinate people at a pop-up COVID-19 vaccination clinic in rural Mississippi. Source: Spencer Platt

A new study estimates that the number of people who have died of COVID-19 in the U.S. is more than 900,000, a number 57% higher than official figures.

Worldwide, the study's authors say, the COVID-19 death count is nearing 7 million, more than double the reported number of 3.24 million.

The analysis comes from researchers at the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, who looked at excess mortality from March 2020 through May 3, 2021, compared it to what

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR3 min readCrime & Violence
New Videos Underscore The Violence Against Police At The Jan. 6 Capitol Riot
In response to a motion filed by NPR and other media organizations, the Justice Department released new videos which prosecutors say show assaults on police officers at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.
NPR2 min readMedical
As Brazil Tops 500,000 COVID-19 Deaths, Protesters Blame President
Anti-government protesters took to the streets nationwide as Brazil's death toll reached a grim benchmark — a tragedy many critics attribute to President Jair Bolsonaro's handling of the pandemic.
NPR4 min readCooking, Food & Wine
Eat Your Feelings — And Cook Them, Too, With These New Catharsis Cookbooks
A lot has been said about the joy of cooking, but what about the fury? A host of new cookbooks right now aim to help cooks pound, grate and shred their feelings about the state of the world.