Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
Need

Need

Written by Carrie Jones

Narrated by Julia Whelan


Need

Written by Carrie Jones

Narrated by Julia Whelan

ratings:
3.5/5 (145 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Released:
Aug 20, 2009
ISBN:
9781423399292
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Zara White suspects there's a freaky guy semi-stalking her. She's also obsessed with phobias. And it's true, she hasn't exactly been herself since her stepfather died. But exiling her to shivery Maine to live with her grandmother? That seems a bit extreme. The move is supposed to help her stay sane . . . but Zara's pretty sure her mom just can't deal with her right now.

She couldn't be more wrong. Turns out the semi-stalker is not a figment of Zara's overactive imagination. In fact, he's still following her, leaving behind an eerie trail of gold dust. There's something not right-not human-in this sleepy Maine town, and all signs point to Zara.

In this creepy, compelling breakout novel, Carrie Jones delivers romance, suspense, and a creature you never thought you'd have to fear.

Released:
Aug 20, 2009
ISBN:
9781423399292
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Carrie Jones is the New York Times and internationally bestselling author of the Need series, as well as Time Stoppers and After Obsession, co-written with Steven E. Wedel. She also co-edited the anthology Dear Bully, about YA authors' experiences with bullying. She is a distinguished alum of Vermont College's MFA program and a part-time police dispatcher in Maine because she likes cop stories. Really. www.carriejonesbooks.com


Related to Need


Reviews

What people think about Need

3.7
145 ratings / 113 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    Need by Carrie Jones is about a girl named Zara going to live in a small town with her Grandmother. She feels abandoned by her mother, and struggles with not wanting to talk to her, and missing her at the same time. On her first day of school, she meets a friendly boy, Ian, who is overly-eager to help the new girl find her way around. Zara also comes into contact with Nick, who seems to be the resident bad-boy. He surprises her by warning her to be careful of Ian. It gets confusing when Ian says the same of Nick. Things begin to grow complicated when Zara finds gold dust in strange places, and a boy disappears. Following some research, Zara suspects that some old superstitions might be actually real.WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERSThis book was alright. The fact that the author used pixies and not vampires was a bit more original. But then of course there were werewolves. And the legend surrounding the Pixie King was interesting. But I had so many problems with this book. From the very first page I had a case of Deja vu, I felt like I was reading Twilight again. A girl, leaving her mother and the big city, moves to a small town with an awkward relative. Her first day she meets the two boys who will rival for her affections, as well as the nasty blonde girl who hates her for her existence. It went on and on like this, subtle similarities to Twilight that I couldn't help notice. I felt that it could have been longer. If she had expanded it, and changed it around, so it wasn't so similar to a certain other book, I would have enjoyed it more. I felt the characters needed a bit more depth, and a bit more work on their relationships. They didn't have very much time with each other to work things out, in a less awkward way. My absolute biggest irritation was with the way some of the characters ended up. A few people were revealed near the end of the book, and I really didn't expect it. Not because it wasn't a stereotypical thing, but because I found that those characters didn't fit in with the way the author was portraying them. It was sort of like that ploy, "You thought this character was good, but I tricked you, they aren't! Surprise!". But it didn't work, since I was wincing in disbelief as I read it
  • (4/5)
    Meet Zara...a high school student who is having a hard time coping with the death of her father. Now her Mom suddenly wants to pack her off to Maine and Zara just doesn't get it. As the new kid in the school she makes friends but she also makes enemies...more of one than the other. Zara is also eat up with phobias and finds that it's difficult to trust herself or anyone else. Some of the "people" that begin to show interest in Zara aren't friends or enemies...they aren't even people. Meet the Pixie's. Not the cute little gold dust scattering creatures but something else entirely. The Pixie king wants Zara but for what? That is the big question. If you want an enjoyable quick read...this one is for you. It's the first by this author that I've read but I will be looking for more.
  • (4/5)
    Faeries (or more specifically Pixies) as bad guys and weres as good guys? Hot guy and interesting story? Okay, I'll go for it. [Okay, so faeries never come out all good, but I generally go for main characters on their sides.] I was excited to find another modern faerie story and I'm always up for a new take, plus I just plain enjoyed it. Now I've got to get hold of the rest of the series (already requested from the library).
  • (4/5)
    *thumbs up*
  • (4/5)
    Entertaining read.
  • (3/5)
    Part of me wants to give this book four stars, but I think I'll go with three because the first half was so bad. It started off dull- I'm honestly sick of reading about lonely 'quirky' teen girls moving to small towns where they bump into a guy who turns out to not be human. It's just completely overdone recently. That said, the second half of the book saved it for me. Once it actually got stuck into telling the story of the supernatural creatures, it got interesting. It was even funny at parts. The twist actually came as a complete surprise to me, which I loved. The main character was both annoying, and kind of interesting. She appears to have some sort of obsessive compulsive disorder which involves reciting the names and definitions of fears- in alphabetical order- whenever she's stressed. It wasn't made clear how exactly Zara remembered all these fears, but I did find it fun to read them. I'm looking forward to reading the sequel because the story is defintely showing promise.
  • (4/5)
    Overall I really liked this book. I liked the voice and the characters (despite the fact that there was a serious lack of contractions in much of the dialogue for the heroine, and people don't talk like that). My only beef was with a component of the climax. The author talks about railroad ties and it was absolutely a case of "that word...I do not think it means what you think it means." Railroad ties. Big, giant, heavy, wooden crosspieces on railroad tracks. Takes big man or at least a couple of reasonably strong women to move them. I think the author was thinking railroad spikes or something because she talked about them as if, a) they were metal, b) they could be lifted and tossed around by a human chick with a broken arm, and c) they could be stabbed into the ground. I have no doubt that the weres could do this, but not the humans in the climactic scene. Still, it wasn't enough to make me toss the book and I'll definitely be getting the second one.
  • (4/5)
    This was a 4-4.5 star book for me.

    Are you feeling a bit of a void now that the Twilight series ended? Are you a little tired of vampires but still want something supernatural? Did you want to read a teen book set in Maine? Have you ever wanted to know the names of lots of phobias?

    Need will fulfill all of those for you. Instead of vamps, it has pixies and shapeshifters. The main character, Zara, recites phobia names to herself as a way of calming herself down. There are definitely some similarities to the Twilight series. Zara, to me, is only a little more kickass than Bella. She is torn between two sexy high schoolers: Nick and Ian. And she saves the day in the end.

    This felt more like a horror story to me than Twilight did too. With Twilight, I never got up to close the curtains. I didn't worry that someone was staring at me. I got a better sense of that with this book.
  • (3/5)
    Definitely underwhelming considering how popular these books are for check out. The came across as poorly written, vague and rather shallow. Some aspects are interesting and the could be potential; however, at this point Stephenie Meyer's books are better.
  • (4/5)
    Stumbled on this book by accident. Pixies and werewolves meet in a small town but are natural enemies. Our heroine is (of course) part pixie and the boy she likes is a werewolf. This is Book One of the Need series which has four titles at this time.
  • (3/5)
    Started off liking this because it seemed clever and well written, plus the use of phobias intrigued me. (And there's even a Charleston connection, though the city is never really "felt" in the story. Maybe the author looked for a place that would be the opposite of Maine in the winter and picked Charleston, without ever being here.) However, it seems to have turned into vampires in pixie clothing, and the pixie lore is a little sketchy. Plus the whole thing about Zara's real father and her conception creeps me out. I don't think I'll go on in the series, and am uncertain if I'll offer this to my granddaughter or not.
  • (4/5)
    I know you just have to substitute a small town in Maine for Forks, and Izzie and Devyn for Alice and Jasper and you would basically have Twilight, but I liked Twilight, so I like this book. It was really funny, I liked that Zara was spunky. Just a fun read.
  • (3/5)
    It's nice when you read a book and discover an aspect of fantasy that you had not read before. I've read about vampires, wizards, werewolves and all those other fantasy creatures that inundate the young adult paranormal genre, but I had never read about pixies. Carrie Jones creates an entertaining world, one shaded by hues of grey. Good and evil; love and hate; truth and reality are all blurred and it makes for a quick and satisfying read.What I liked most about Carrie's world is the fact that is seems so real, like if there were any part of fantasy that were true, this world would be it. It's like maybe, just maybe, pixies do exist in a realm of forest and trees, and maybe werewolves and other were-creatures exist alongside them, in constant battle, facing off for the future of humans. One can hope, right??I wish that Carrie Jones would have spent more time developing the romance. I won't say who Zara falls for because you need to read for yourself, but I was craving more intimacy. I wanted to hear how his hands moved along her sides, brushed her thighs, and how his breath was heavy on her neck! I wanted to hear how Zara's world stopped when he kissed her, and I wanted more of his reaction to--you know what I'm talking about! The sexy manly growl from deep within that makes you wish you could trade places with the girl. But there was none of that. Don't get me wrong, there are some kissy scenes, but I wanted more passion. I wanted them to be the types of scenes that I dog-eared so I could go back and read them over and over again. Hopefully we get more detail in the next book!So overall, it was an interesting and different read. The prose was a little rough at time, and I'm hoping for more eloquence in the future novels, and definitely some more romance. I am definitely going to check out the next book to see what happens!
  • (3/5)
    Need is a somewhat unique take on the typical faerie lore out there in the YA market. We're dealing with pixies here instead of faeries, though I'm not really sure what the difference is. I liked all of the characters (other than the bad guys), and I felt that they were fairly well-developed for a first book. The plot was intriguing, and the pacing was pretty spot-on. However, the writing itself wasn't the best. Jones worded things awkwardly, and at times I had no idea what she was talking about. If it wasn't for the awkward writing style, then this book would have probably gotten an A. As it stands, I can't give it any higher than a C+. I am hopeful that Jones will improve her writing in the following books, though.Need had a lot of potential. Creepy-stalker faerie guy? Check. Hot love interest? Check. Quirky parental figure? Check. Somewhat strong main character? Check. Remote, but interesting setting? Check. I just wish that Jones had read her sentences out loud before she sent them to the publisher. Or that the editors had read them out loud and said, "hey, this sounds really freaking weird. We should have her reword this..." Here are some examples:"Snow stains his hair white, sticks in his eyebrows. His face rivers into something warm." - rivers is not a verb. Seriously, someone should have caught this."His jaw is so straight and his eyes are so deep, like a tree where the bark is all textured." - okay, really? Your eyes are like trees? Umm if someone told me that, I'd smack them. Also, sometimes there were inconsistencies in the tensing. I think this book would have been much better in past tense.Anyway, moving on. There wasn't much suspense. She hints at things like a three year old keeps a secret. I mean she seriously throws in way too many "clues" for anyone not to get it. Aside from the character reveals, which weren't a surprise, there were a few semi-surprises. I really hope that Jones becomes a more graceful writer by book two.Other than Jones' lack clumsy writing skills, the book was actually pretty good. The plot was interesting, and I never got bored. I liked how Zara was obsessed with phobias. Her Amnesty International thing got really annoying for me, but the phobia thing was cool. I liked how every chapter was titled with a phobia that somehow tied into that chapter. Every character was quirky and a bit unique. No cookie-cutter characters here. And the main characters all seemed to develop a bit over the course of the novel. Not too much, but enough that it was at least noticeable.Overall, I'd recommend this book to someone who's looking for a light read. The writing is awkward, though, (I know I keep saying awkward, but I don't know how else to describe it) so I'd recommend checking it out from the library first, just to be sure you actually like it. It's definitely worth giving a chance, though. I'm looking forward to reading the second book in the series.
  • (4/5)
    Zara has been relocated against her will to rural Maine to live with her grandmother and try to recover from the death of her step-father. One thing you learn about Zara is that she has the quirky habit of memorizing phobias and reciting them to herself when she gets stressed out or nervous. I thought that was an interesting characteristic and, let's face it, it's kind of fun to find out all of the different phobias a person could have. Of course, you get the feeling right away that things aren't quite right in this tiny town, but it takes a while to figure out exactly what that is. In the mean time, Carrie Jones does a good job of setting the scene and making you feel the cold that surrounds everyone during the harsh Maine winters. Two boys, Nick and Ian, immediately start vying for her attention, but fear not! This is no love triangle, I assure you. Nothing is as it seems in this town, least of all the boys.One thing I will say about this book is that there is a slow revealing of what exactly is going on. It's not the type of story where you figure out who is what during the first chapter. That gradual method of story telling helped keep the suspense high for much of the book and there are some very creepy scenes that take place deep in the snowy forest. There were parts that were a little draggy and Zara does a lot of waiting in the house by herself, but overall I would say that this was very entertaining and different from a lot of the books I've read that focus on this genre of folklore. It was a strong start to a series that I look forward to reading.
  • (3/5)
    I wasn't really crazy about this book. I love Young Adult books, but this one was just a little too much YOUNG and not enough ADULT for my tastes. It almost seemed like it was geared towards junior highers. Which isn't a bad thing - junior highers read too - but it just wasn't for me. In Need's defense, it was the first Faerie book I've ever read, so I wasn't used to any of the mythology or anything either.
  • (3/5)
    Synopsis:Zara White suspects there's a freaky guy semi-stalking her. She's also obsessed with phobias. And it's true, she hasn't exactly been herself since her stepfather died. But exiling her to shivery Maine to live with her grandmother? That seems a bit extreme. The move is supposed to help her stay sane...but Zara's pretty sure her mom just can't deal with her right now.She couldn't be more wrong. Turns out the semi-stalker is not a figment of Zara's overactive imagination. In fact, he's still following her, leaving behind an eerie trail of gold dust. There's something not right - not human - in this sleepy Maine town, and all signs point to Zara.In this creepy, compelling breakout novel, Carrie Jones delivers romance, suspense, and a creature you never thought you'd have to fearReview:Despite thinking that the evil in this book sounded a little too stupid - yes we're talking pixies that are like faeries but not faeries, they're pixies! - I really enjoyed this book.From the beginning, the story starts in a nice quirky way that grabs your attention. Zara is hung up about phobias, she knows most of them, and recites them to keep her sanity from going under.The writing is fluid and pacey, there aren't that many lulls in the story where you start getting bored. We have a girl starting a new school, moving in with her grandmother and the normal YA tropes that might sound similar to other books.But overall, I enjoyed it. Things I didn't like were small such as nearly all the characters turn out to be something fantastical. The plot is a little too predictable in places but, hey, I've just finished a book that disappointed me immensely so this was a nice boost on the enjoyment side.
  • (5/5)
    Zara doesn't like Maine. She's mad at her mother for sending her here to live with her grandma after her father died, making her feel even more alone then before. While she has no problem making friends, she doesn't have a hard time making enemies either. She has two guys flocking her: Ian, the charmingly kind over achiever, and Nick, the tall, handsome and protective one. But there are threats. The strange man who has stalked Zara ever since her dad passed has kept popping up and disappearing at the wierdest times, leaving a trail of gold dust behind. Her and her friends may have a theory for it. But it's crazy(or is it?) Because after all, who would ever believe that pixies are real? "Need" was a fabulous book. The story kept my on my toes at all times, never failing to create suspenseful events that led up to one big "WOW" moment. Carrie Jones was really good at developing the whole plot and fitting the characters into their roles perfectly. I will admit that I was a little skeptical when my friend told me about this, explaining that it was about pixies. I was honestly expecting some frilly Tinkerbell romance novel. I did not get a frilly Tinkerbell romance novel. Instead, I got an amazing piece of work that redefines fantasy. Do I recommend this? Of course, two thumbs up. Seriously, read this book, and the books following it. You will be really happy you did.
  • (5/5)
    Zara White's world feels as if it has ended. Her beloved stepdad has just died, her mother is sending her away from their hometown of Charleston to the icebox people call Maine, and she thinks she is being stalked. Adjusting to life in Maine is tough. Zara hates the cold, hates being the new girl, hates that her mother sent her away, and hates that she can't stop thinking about Nick. On top of everything else things are starting to get weird around town. Boys are starting to go missing again and she keeps seeing the man who was following her in Charleston. The only clue as to who this man is is the gold dust he leaves behind, no footprints, just gold dust. To make the weird even more weird her new friends Issie, Devyn, and Nick are trying to convince her that the mysterious man is a ...pixie and he is after her. The more she learns about this frightening new world the more scared and determined she is to keep her loved ones safe. While discovering this new world Zara just might learn who and what she is. In YA novels we usually see the world of faeries, but Carrie Jones introduces us to pixies and a few other creatures who seem to get overlooked. I have to give full disclosure. I am a complete fan girl when it comes to this series. I go out and buy and read these books the day they come out. I absolutely loved the characters in this book. You have Zara who never stops campaigning for Amnesty International and recites phobias when she is nervous. Gram is a kickbutt granny with a penchant for dirty words and sarcasm, Nick is the soft hearted mister Macho Man Protector, Issie is the cute, clumsy, quirky bunny lover, and Devyn is the cute wheelchair bound nerd. They are wonderful! ***Slight Spoiler*** Just to break up the monotonous gushing the only part (according to me) that could be improved upon is how fast and completely Nick and Zara fall for each other once they get over their problems. Other than that I love this series. It's a great romance with great characters. I give this book a 4 STAR rating.
  • (4/5)
    Wow, it's been awhile since I read this one... I read it mostly for the voice, which is first person present, as I'm rewriting a novel into first person present from third person past, and I wanted to study how the author used this tense. I think she did a very good job, even though I wasn't as thrilled as I'd hoped with the story. It's a decent book, but that's about it. I didn't find anything particularly remarkable about it, or about the characters themselves. The plot was fairly standard, though fairies and shapeshifters have their own terminology. This is one of those books that, if you see it on sale somewhere, is worth picking up (if you're a fan of YA contemporary-style fantasy). Not the strongest plot or characters, but a worthwhile diversion nonetheless. And I should say, I did go on to read the second book in the series, so make of that what you will.
  • (3/5)
    Zara White is witness to her stepfather's death, heart-attack right in front of her. Since that day, she hasn't quite been herself. Practically dead inside, Zara's mother exiles her from sunny, warm Charleston to snowy, cold Maine to live with her grandmother.After her grandmother picks her up from the airport, Zara sees a mysterious man standing on the side of the road as they drive home. It's not just some coincidence. Thing is, Zara's seen this man before. In Charleston, at the airport, and now here.Things don't seem right in the small town of Bedford, Maine, and Zara (with the help of her new friends) is about to find out why. She'll finally learn who this man is that seems to be stalking her, why there is this mysterious gold dust lying around and she'll discover strange beings exist outside the realm of Stephen King.I think the covers in this series are beautiful. I love the simplicity and the gold accents. Unfortunately, the cover was about all this book had going for it. I hate to say it, but I was absolutely bored with this book until about the last third of it. The writing was so dull and simplistic, it was just a drag to get through. I felt like I was reading something written for a kindergarten reading level.I felt that the characters were completely underdeveloped. Ms. Jones gave us a mere outline of each character, there was no real depth to any of them. Due to this, I couldn't get a real vision of feel for any of the characters.The "romance" was shallow and superficial. Nick was constantly described as being musky, well muscled, incredible looking, gorgeous smile, etc. Everything is based on looks and lust, no deeper level to their relationship.Aside from the cover, the only other thing that kept me reading this book was the last hundred pages (where the action picked up, but not too much) and the phobias. Each chapter is titled after a phobia and an explanation of it's meaning is given (ie: Teratophobia - fear of monsters or deformed people). The main character also chanted some other phobias randomly throughout the story, but they really didn't have much to do with it at all.I'm hoping that the second book in the series, Captivate, will be a better read.
  • (4/5)
    NEED, by Carrie Jones, is an alluring story that follows a phobia-obsessed girl to Bedford, Maine, after her step-father's death. Zara's mother thought she needed a change of scenery, but what Zara found was an adventure and mystery of supernatural proportions.I enjoyed this story very much. A new image of pixies and Were's were introduced and I found myself engrossed in listening to this book right from the start. I think this book was a great beginning to the series because we got the whole backstory of Zara and the strange happenings in Bedford. I felt there was no stone unturned at the end of the book, and I was ready to continue the story when it was over.Since this story was such a mystery at the beginning, I was surprised when each secret was revealed. The pixies and Were's that Jones created were unique in their own right. The physical attributes of the pixies was interesting, I liked the fact that when un-glamoured they were blue with wicked sharp teeth. It added an element of savagery that otherwise was not shown when glamoured. I also liked that the Were's were not just Werewolves, they were able to take the shape of other animals as well, which I admit is pretty awesome.In terms of characters, I had mixed emotions. I really liked Zara but the Amnesty International thing got a bit preachy at times. I understand that she was passionate about it, but I felt at times it went a bit overboard for me. Also, with Issie and her babbling, I tended to roll my eyes a lot. But even though she was a bit annoying at times, I felt she was an absolute sweetheart and a steady friend for Zara during this crazy time in her life. Zara and Nick were obviously meant for each other. Nick was the protective type and Zara was always putting herself in trouble and needing Nick, they were great compliments for each other.There was one thing that turned me off from the audiobook that probably would have never been an issue if I read the book instead of listened, which was the accents of the Bedford residents. Besides Devyn, the rest of the characters voices were high-pitched and similar to a Boston accent. Personally, I dislike that accent so for the first half of the book I was cringing whenever Betty or Issie spoke. Nothing against Julia Whelan because she only performed as she was supposed to, but I am unenthusiastic about that accent so I felt that took away from the story immensely.Other than that, I enjoyed this story and was very anxious to start the next book, Captivate.
  • (4/5)
    I actually don't know where to begin!Well, for starters, I loved the main character Zara. She is not at all your typical teenage book character and I loved seeing her internal dilemma as she struggled between who she wanted to be, and what she was afraid to be. I think Carrie Jones did a fantastic job of creating a character many people would both be able to relate to and admire.That being said, were there a lot of parallels to Twilight? Sure there were. But were there enough differences to make it stand out as an original and unique story? Absolutely! I don't want to say to much about the plot because there isn't much I can say without giving away spoilers. One slightly negative thing I have to say is the main character did accept the super natural a little too quickly for me. I tend to prefer all other explanations to be completely invalidated before the super natural becomes the only answer, but that small thing did not take away from the books appeal for me. Book buyers beware though! If you buy only the first book in this series like I did, you will regret it! Once you finish this one, you will find you have a "need" for the next one! (not because the book ends in a ridiculous cliff hanger, but because the story is that compelling!)
  • (5/5)
    Since the death of her stepfather, Zara has been lost. She can't seem to find her place in the world without him so her mom decides to send Zara to his hometown in Maine. From the moment she steps off the plane, Zara knows something is wrong. Zara seems to have a bit of a stalker.Zara knows its unlikely that she has a stalker but she knows that she has seen the guy before. In fact, she knows exactly when and where she saw him: standing outside the window of her house looking in ...moreSince the death of her stepfather, Zara has been lost. She can't seem to find her place in the world without him so her mom decides to send Zara to his hometown in Maine. From the moment she steps off the plane, Zara knows something is wrong. Zara seems to have a bit of a stalker.Zara knows its unlikely that she has a stalker but she knows that she has seen the guy before. In fact, she knows exactly when and where she saw him: standing outside the window of her house looking in while her stepfather lay dying on the floor. If she didn't know that for a fact Zara would believe that she is just imagining things.It seems that this man has been wreaking some havoc on the little town in Maine that Zara is moving to. Boys her age have started to go missing and this is apparently not the first time in history. With the help of some new friends and her not-so-old grandmother, Zara is determined to find out who or what is doing this and stop them from hurting anyone else.I wasn't sure what to think about this book when I first started. I had heard that it could be compared to Twilight and Wicked Lovely but I was skeptical. I'm not now.Need was such a great story, full of cute boys and pixies. I loved it. All the characters were so detailed and full of life. I don't think I can find a single thing bad to say about it and this is after a day of going back over the book.Not only were the characters amazing, the plot was too. There was so much going on, but not enough to detract from any one aspect. There was something for all readers: the paranormal, danger, romance, suspense. This is one of those books that just grabs you from page 1. I admit that I put off most of my homework to finish this.Usually, I wouldn't say that paranormal books are for everyone but I think this one might be. It isn't just a paranormal love story. It is so much more. And for readers who are not fans of Twilight, I still think you would love this book so don't let that put you off the book.
  • (3/5)
    This book could have been amazing. I loved the idea of the plot, but it never got fleshed out properly. Need could have been amazing if it had been written with more emphasis on character and plot development. the reader is forced to just accept a lot of things in the story without having any back round. Carrie says and so it is, seems to be the glue that holds the book together. But as i said, it could have been amazing, so i read the next two hoping that with the success of the first one maybe some better editors had been hired to reign the author in. alas, no, Carrie was allowed to run free and the series has gotten exponentially worse.
  • (3/5)
    There are many reasons for the move, not least of which being for Zara's mental health. After her father died, after she watched her step-father, the only father she has ever known and loved, die before her eyes life lost all meaning. She felt dead inside, hollow, all she knew was that she had been left alone, abandoned and life had lost all meaning.Slowly, Zara is beginning to wake from her grief stricken state only to find herself in a strange, altered world. Zara begins to notice things, remember things, like the guy present when her father died was the same guy at the airport when she left Charleston. He also shows up on her arrival in Maine and at her new school. A weird stalker would be bad enough except this is no ordinary stalker and what he needs will change Zara forever.Need is a Pixie King without his Queen, where gold dust, pointy teeth and a lust for blood can only be tempered with a kiss. However, Zara is learning all about the strange and supernatural things in the world, like the existence of Pixies who above all else should definitely not be kissed, unlike a curtain werewolf who is very cute and very kissable. A supernatural teen romance where one girl discovers the secret of her heritage and the truth about pixies.
  • (4/5)
    An entertaining young adult novel that delves into the territory of faeries. Cute and enjoyable with slightly dark undertones it makes a nice read.
  • (3/5)
    Yay! I loved this book with Zara and Nick, they are the perfect couple. Especially since she's part Pixie and he's a werewolf....amazing love story.
  • (5/5)
    Zara just lost her Dad well step Dad actually. She has kinda checked out since. She can't seem to get her life back together again. Her mom being so worried about her sends her to live with her Grandma in Maine. This mysterious and frightening guy keeps appearing in Zara's life. She thinks it is a figment of her imagination. But soon finds out he's not.As soon as she arrives in Maine the guy is there too. And so is a the beginning of a horrible crime that happened before many many years ago. Boys from the town keep going missing.She makes some new friends and together they start trying to solve the appearance of this creepy guy. When they figure out who and what he is Zara thinks maybe her new friends are crazy. They tell her they believe he is a Pixie. Not a tinker belle happy go lucky Pixie but a deadly not to joke around about Pixie. And they think he is the reason these boys are going missing.Together they try to figure out why he is there and what he wants. They know he wants a Queen and they think he wants Zara. Then Zara discovers many many secrets of her parents past and she decides she has to end this. More boys are missing and she can't let this happen. Together with her friends and Grandma they decide to take him down once and for all!
  • (5/5)
    This is a great book to start the new year off with- if all of the books that I read this year are as good as this, well then I have an amazing year ahead of me! I think that this book has the perfect amount of adventure and romance and therefore this book= perfect for me!I am not going to lie, I had no idea what this book was about prior to buying it- in fact, I didn't even figure out what type of paranormals were in it until 70 pages into the book and when it was revealed that the paranormals were pixies and weres I was quite surprised. I can't recall ever reading a story where both of these magical races play leading roles together/ the history of them being arch enemies was something new to me, so I just thought that it was a unique spin on the typical were/ faerie story.Anyways, I am in love! I know, I know, I profess love for every new male character I happen to come across, but this time I am serious! Nick is a combination of Jace Wayland and Jay Heaton- he is all bad-ass like Jace and all cute and caring like Jay= perfect. I can't help but think that maybe it would have been best had Zara's mom stayed with her dad at the end of the novel. I mean, her mom did technically send her away because she didn't want to deal with her and her depression anymore and as such, was most likely not going to be a major component of her life anymore. So I don't understand why having a pixie mom would be such a big deal? I just think that cheesing her father off will make him even more vengeful and because they double crossed him he will no longer be willing to make any deals with them in the future. Talk about burning that bridge... Plus Zara talked to her father about martyrdom, sacrificing oneself for the greater good- why could she not have understood and accepted that this was exactly what her mom was trying to do? Anyways, I have read numerous reviews where people have said that this book is a blatant rip-off of "Twilight" and though there are some similarities between the two novels, I feel like these similarities are coincidental or that they are so minuscule that they by no means have that much impact on the outcome of the story/ plot line. For instance, both books start off with the main characters on an airplane, moving across the country to start a new life- that is where that similarity ends. It is Bella's choice to move in with her father so that her mom and step dad can start a new life together, whereas Zara has no choice in the matter when it comes to moving in with her grandmother, her mother forces her into it, thinking that a change in scenery will help alleviate her daughters depression. Another similarity that arises is that both male main characters cars are mentioned throughout the novel- personally I'd take Nick's car over Edward's any day. Whereas Edward is all pretty boy, very much someone who is unattainable in the realm of high school, and someone who I believe the reader may have a difficult time relating to, I think that Nick is kind of lumberjack chic or humble jock boy, an all around nice guy with a hero complex, and a guy who is entirely relatable to the reader- he is just like that childhood friend that you've grown up with and have always been able to depend on. Both females are warned about the boys that they eventually fall for- Bella is warned by Jessica not to get too attached to Edward because he has no apparent interest in high school girls, whereas Zara is warned that Nick is "bad news". Both girls have a quirky BFF, Bella has Alice and Zara has Is. Both Zara and Bella think about sacrificing themselves in order to protect those that they love, but only Bella goes through with it, as Zara chickens out at the last minute. However, Zara more than makes up for it with her plan at the end of the novel. Thankfully Nick and Zara do not profess their love for one another early in the plot line like Bella and Edward do, in fact, they do not profess their love for one another whatsoever, they only admit to "really, really liking" one another. Unlike in "Twilight" however, in this book I actually really like the main female character, Zara. Zara doesn't do the whole bittey lip thing, she is quite strong and independent (well, after she gets over her depression that is) and she actually has a personality. Furthermore, I didn't really feel any connection to the authority figures in "Twilight" (ie. Charlie, Carlisle, and whatnot), like I did in this book. Betty? Yeah, friggin hilarious and Zara is super lucky to have her as a grandmother.Even now I admit that I feel like I had to fish for the similarities- kind of like how I think that the critics of this book had to- this is a YA adult, and as such the characters are typically teenagers. Well what do teenagers do? They go to high school, make friends, gossip, think about cute boys, start dating cute boys and whatnot, as it is for every other YA plot line. So I don't think that it is fair to say that this is a rip off by any means, these are necessary elements of a YA novel. Furthermore, in my opinion the differences fair outweigh the similarities.