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Players in Pigtails

Players in Pigtails

Written by Shana Corey

Narrated by Zooey Deschanel


Players in Pigtails

Written by Shana Corey

Narrated by Zooey Deschanel

ratings:
4/5 (7 ratings)
Length:
10 minutes
Released:
Jan 1, 2004
ISBN:
9780545749435
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Katie Casey was baseball mad. Had the fever and had it bad. A story that celebrates a brave girls love of the game as she works to become a player in the first-ever All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.
Released:
Jan 1, 2004
ISBN:
9780545749435
Format:
Audiobook

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Reviews

What people think about Players in Pigtails

4.1
7 ratings / 12 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    A story of a young girl aspiring to play baseball and shoe everyone that girls can but just as good as guys. Katie, how the story is focused on, makes it all the way to the big leagues. The setting of this story is very important because back then women were not allowed to play but now they are allowed. Perservance is the big theme in this story.
  • (5/5)
    This would be under the historical fiction category. We would discuss the differences from then and now when it comes to women rights and then we could go back to our seats and compare and contrast today's rights to back then rights.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this book. The big idea is to show young girls that they can do anything boys can. The illustrations are simple, but cute and help display the story. The language is child-friendly and easy to read.
  • (5/5)
    This is a historical fiction picture book about the acceptance of women to play baseball professionally. The book specifically follows Katie Casey a girl who loved to play baseball. It was all she thought about, but her parents and those around her couldn't see what good baseball was to a girl. But during the war, men were gone and women were recruited for baseball. Katie was one of them. But in order to make the girls look girly they made the uniforms dresses and sent them to etiquette school. When they stepped on the field everyone started laughing. That is until they started playing.
  • (5/5)
    Players in Pigtails by Shana Corey is a historical fiction picture book based on women's involvement with baseball during WWII. Growing up Katie Casey wasn't like the other girls. She didn't like to cook, sew, or wear dresses. But she loved baseball! Everyone thought it was silly. They would say "What good is baseball to a girl?" When WWII broke up and men went off to war women went to work and they got to play baseball. Katie Casey finally got to show the world that girls could play baseball just as good as boys!This would be a great book to use in a classroom to take about gender equity. There could be discussions afterwards based on gender specific roles and how they came about. This book could also be used in the classroom when learning about WWII, you can use this book to talk about women involvement during the war.
  • (5/5)
    "Players In Pigtails", tells of a young girl named Katie Casey that was not very good at being a girl. She could not bake, nor wear cloths that were nice and neat. She didn't even like dancing. She always had a different subject on her mind. That subject was baseball. Katie not only loved baseball more than anything, she was also very good at it. During this time World War II was occurring and more and more men were being sent off to defend that country. Due to the decline of men in the U.S. women were taking factory jobs and even fighting in the war as well. The number of baseball players was also declining. A man had the grate idea of starting a women professional baseball league. Katie was so excited to try out and it was a good thing that she did because she made the team! She was finally able to play the sport that she loved the most!I loved this book! Mainly because I love baseball but this book also reminds me of the movie League of Your Own and that was one of my all time favorite movies as a kid and now an adult. In a classroom I could use this book by showing that you can do almost anything if you try no matter if you are a girl or a boy. Can be used to show sportsmanship and fair play for everyone.
  • (4/5)
    This is an exciting book that tells the story of the historic first women's baseball team. The book is about a young girl named Katie that was not very girly. She did not like to do things other girls enjoyed doing like baking and dancing and she was not that good at keeping her clothes neat and tidy. While the war was requiring more soldiers it left few men to play the beloved sport of baseball. One smart man decided to develop a women's team and Katie was so excited to sign up. She made it and she was good!Classroom Extension: Use this book to study the introduction of women into a variety of sports and how more and more women became involved in traditional male roles.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this book because of the characters. I felt like the characters were very relatable. For example, the girl in the book, Katie Casey, wants to play baseball but no one wants to accept that she could actually be good at baseball. They just assume that since she is a girl, she cannot play baseball. I also thought the plot was very organized. The story started off with her not being able to play baseball and then built up until she was able to play on a real girls team. I think the big idea of this story is that no matter what gender you are, you should be able to do the things that you want to do. You shouldn't be discriminated against because you are a female and not a male.
  • (4/5)
    An ALA Amelia Bloomer Project Recommended Book. Color illustrations on every page to enhance the story. History details at the end. Two songs are also featured.
  • (5/5)
    In my opinion, this is a great book. One thing I liked about the book was the plot. The book was organized and flowed well. In the beginning of the book, the reader meets Katie Casey. “Katie Casey wasn't good at being a girl at least not the kind of girl everyone thought she should be.” Katie loved playing baseball, and she wasn't very good at “ladylike” things. No one in the book could understand Katie’s love of all things baseball. “‘What good is baseball to a girl?’” During World War II, there weren't many men around to play baseball. That’s when the owner of the Chicago Cubs came up with the idea of creating an all-girls professional baseball league. The girls on the team were laughed at in the beginning, but they proved they had what it takes to be baseball players. Another reason I like this book is because it pushes the reader to think about stereotypical gender roles. The book pushes readers to think about the fact that women enjoy sports too. There are some women who happen to be very good at sports. Not all women enjoy baking and sewing, Katie didn't. “She preferred sliding to sewing, batting to baking, and home runs to homecoming.” The big idea of this book is not to make assumptions about a person based on their gender.
  • (5/5)
    I loved that the main character, Katie, was not a “typical girl.” She could not knit, bake, or dance like the other girls, but she was really good at baseball. Katie embraced her differences and did not conform to the mainstream idea of what a woman should be. She is a great example for girls who have different interests than her peers. Another aspect of the book I liked was the historical reference to the All American Girls Professional Baseball League. This league is often overlooked in history, though it was the beginning of a general acceptance of women as professional athletes. I found it interesting to learn the historical context of the all girls baseball league, especially since it does not exist anymore. It makes me curious why the league was never brought back, especially now where equality for women is emphasized. The message of this book is acceptance of differences and appreciating gifts and talents in young women, even if society opposes.
  • (3/5)
    I thought this book was great. I love the main character, Katie Casey, and how different she was. She didn't enjoy baking, or knitting, or any other activities most girls enjoy. She loved baseball, and she wanted to pursue this goal. I also love that the author pushes readers to broaden their prospectives about gender equality. She kept asking, "what is baseball to a girl?" She talks about how the world was beginning to change due to WWII, and that new things were about to happen. This means people needed to broaden their perspectives and embrace equality; including equal baseball privileges! I think the overall message of this story is to not judge or stereotype people based on their gender.