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The Interpretation of Dreams

The Interpretation of Dreams

Written by Sigmund Freud

Narrated by Michael Page


The Interpretation of Dreams

Written by Sigmund Freud

Narrated by Michael Page

ratings:
4.5/5 (23 ratings)
Length:
21 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Mar 21, 2011
ISBN:
9781452671284
Format:
Audiobook

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Description

What are the most common dreams and why do we have them? What does a dream about death mean? What do dreams of swimming, failing, or flying symbolize?



First published by Sigmund Freud in 1899, The Interpretation of Dreams considers why we dream and what it means in the larger picture of our psychological lives. Delving into theories of manifest and latent dream content, the special language of dreams, dreams as wish fulfillments, the significance of childhood experiences, and much more, Freud, widely considered the "father of psychoanalysis," thoroughly and thoughtfully examines dream psychology.



Encompassing dozens of case histories and detailed analyses of actual dreams, this landmark text presents Freud's legendary work as a tool for comprehending our sleeping experiences.
Publisher:
Released:
Mar 21, 2011
ISBN:
9781452671284
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Sigmund Freud né Sigismund Schlomo Freud le 6 mai 1856 à Freiberg (Autriche) (actuelle République tchèque) et mort le 23 septembre 1939 à Londres, est un neurologue autrichien, fondateur de la psychanalyse. Médecin viennois, Freud rencontre plusieurs personnalités importantes pour le développement de la psychanalyse, dont il est le principal théoricien. Son amitié avec Wilhelm Fliess, sa collaboration avec Josef Breuer, l'influence de Jean-Martin Charcot et des théories sur l'hypnose de l'École de la Salpêtrière vont le conduire à repenser les processus psychiques. Ses deux grandes découvertes sont la sexualité infantile et l'inconscient. Elles le conduiront à élaborer plusieurs théorisations des instances psychiques, en premier lieu avec les concepts d'inconscient, de rêve et de névrose, puis il proposera une technique de thérapie, la cure psychanalytique, qu'il définit pour la première fois en 19042. C'est dans le cadre de la cure, dès les Études sur l'hystérie, et particulièrement dans sa première analyse du « cas Dora », que Freud découvre peu à peu l'importance du transfert.



Reviews

What people think about The Interpretation of Dreams

4.4
23 ratings / 12 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    This book probably gets a perfect score from all psychoanalysts everywhere. But for the rest of us living in the real world this book serves better as the thoughts of a poet in action than any actual psychological applications. Nearly all of Sigmund Freud's findings have been refuted with good evidence. For example, Freud thought Fyodor Dostoyevsky's epilepsy was caused by guilt over his father's death when in fact his sons exhibited the same epilepsy,Nevertheless these ideas are highly tempting and extremely fun to work with. In fact, for the artist they are helpful to one of the highest degrees. It is a highly compelling idea, to take one of the book's biggest conceits, that all dreams are wish fulfillment dreams. The fact that it takes much teasing to bring out that tendency doesn't detract from the thought because we honestly have no idea what dreams are. Some say dreams reflect wish fulfillments and fears, and this seems to be closest to the truth since mankind's first emotion is fear, but dreams are so grotesque, non-sensical, and emotionally charging that it seems so much more is involved with them than beats the eye. Indeed, when Freud is not over-complicating things he is actually over-simplifying them. But this may be the trapping of every person who studies dreams.Freud's views are heavily rooted in scientific observation so that lends a lot of credence to his theories. In that sense it's easy to see why his views took off in America where they didn't take off in Europe. It's also easy to explain his ascension in America by the fact that Americans don't want to take responsibility for their actions and would rather blame "supernatural" forces such as the id and the super-ego (as opposed to just the ego). Indeed, it's easy to see how some of Freud's more ridiculous ideas stemmed from this simple seed of a book. He did not form his Oedipal Complex theory yet when this book came out, which was probably his most famous theory, but it's only too easy to see how much bullshit could spring from this one book, which was his first. Sigmund Freud may have ultimately been a charlatan, but I personally believe that he was genuinely on the search for truth. "Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar." Indeed, and so sometimes humans are utterly flawed and it's a wonder we can cipher out the truth in any instance at all, let alone the least likely of instances.
  • (4/5)
    Sigmund Freud's "The Interpretation of Dreams" is a fascinating subject. There is still no precise science to this endeavor -- though over the past century much more has been learned about neurology and the mind, reshaping psychology dramatically since Freud. Unlike traditional cult and folk approaches, Freud tried to apply psychology to interpreting dreams rather than spiritual or religious mythoi. Since Freud we've learned that dreams often are a way for our minds to incorporate the day's events, to help us learn what we think we've learned. We've also learned that dreams can fill multiple functions, not just learning but also, as Freud proposed, wish fulfillment and the mind's attempt to deal with traumas. Dreams can vary in any of us from night to night and each can serve a different purpose. Dreams are also often merely entertainment for the mind while we're asleep.Though much has changed in psychology over the past century since Freud, I would recommend reading "The Interpretation of Dreams". Just keep an open mind and figure that not every dream has some deep psychological meaning.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing narration and content. Totally worth the listen, highly recommend
  • (5/5)
    1st — of it’s place in time indeed. Remark t’.
  • (5/5)
    Very thorough and comprehensive analysis. I wasn't expecting hard science, since, as experimental data, dreams are a difficult ground for repeatability. Freud is very good at separating the component mechanisms: consolidation, censor, and wish fulfilment, and he clearly saw dreams as ultimately intelligible windows into mental life.
  • (4/5)
    I discovered that Freud is a excellent writer. This is perhaps the most basic book about his ideas and psychoanalysis. Of course it very dated now, but Freud was trying to understand the mind. I know that one of the criticism of Freud is that he only talked or wrote about sex, but that because that what all patients talked about