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Judas Child

Judas Child

Written by Carol O'Connell

Narrated by Erika Leigh


Judas Child

Written by Carol O'Connell

Narrated by Erika Leigh

ratings:
4.5/5 (7 ratings)
Length:
14 hours
Released:
Jun 19, 2009
ISBN:
9781423390640
Format:
Audiobook

Description

It is three days before Christmas, and two young girls have disappeared from the local academy. This hasn't happened for fifteen years, since Rouge Kendall's twin sister was murdered. The killer was found, but now Rouge, twenty-five and a policeman, is forced to wonder: was he really the one? Also wondering is a former classmate named Ali Cray, a forensic psychologist with scars of her own. The pattern is the same, she says: a child called out to meet a friend. The friend is the bait, the Judas child, and is quickly killed. But the primary victim lives longer…until Christmas day.

Rouge doesn't want to hear this. He's spent the last fifteen years trying to avoid the memories. A little girl has haunted his dreams all these years-and he has three days to finally put her to rest.

Filled with rich prose, resonant characters, and knife-edged suspense that have won so many fans, Judas Child is Carol O'Connell's most powerful novel yet.

Released:
Jun 19, 2009
ISBN:
9781423390640
Format:
Audiobook

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What people think about Judas Child

4.7
7 ratings / 1 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    This author gets me where I live. I appreciate the fact that her characters of both genders are good, bad, and indifferent. Her descriptions are lean and specific and I can see the images she draws.

    As with most stories in this genre, the situations are a tad implausible at times, but I just make sure my ‘willing suspension of disbelief’ is in gear and ride along.

    Perhaps my deepest pleasure is her wry humor and the fact that she seems to know what both men and women are thinking. At the end of this book, a flawed but willing-to-learn man is flummoxed by the language of flowers, frustrated that women are fluent in that language and men must resort to florists’ cheat sheets. I laughed out loud, a rarity when reading.

    I will read as much Carol O’Connell as I can get my hands on, if only to find out what the heck men ARE thinking.