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The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man

Written by H. G. Wells

Narrated by Scott Brick


The Invisible Man

Written by H. G. Wells

Narrated by Scott Brick

ratings:
3.5/5 (82 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 11, 2008
ISBN:
9781400178575
Format:
Audiobook

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Description

Once a brilliant scientist, Griffin has been gradually consumed by his research. When he finally achieves his goal-becoming completely invisible-the final result is his departure from humanity. He feels no remorse in using his invisibility to gratify his increasing desires. As he gradually loses his mind, it is hard to determine if it is a result of his chemical concoction or a simple continuation of his moral decline.



At a time when science fiction was depicting what wonders the future would bring, H. G. Wells was one of the first writers to explore the dark side of science and to portray how easily mortal man can be corrupted when tempted by seemingly unlimited power. First published in 1897, The Invisible Man helped establish Wells as one of the first and best writers of science fiction. Notable for its sheer invention, suspense, and psychological nuance, The Invisible Man continues to enthrall science fiction fans today.
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 11, 2008
ISBN:
9781400178575
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

The son of a professional cricketer and a lady’s maid, H. G. Wells (1866–1946) served apprenticeships as a draper and a chemist’s assistant before winning a scholarship to the prestigious Normal School of Science in London. While he is best remembered for his groundbreaking science fiction novels, including The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, and The Island of Doctor Moreau, Wells also wrote extensively on politics and social matters and was one of the foremost public intellectuals of his day. 



Reviews

What people think about The Invisible Man

3.6
82 ratings / 108 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    In H. G. Wells' classic novel, a scientist turns himself invisible and wreaks havoc in rural England. This book is a versatile classic because it could be read by someone who is young or who simply wants to read fluff, but it can also be appreciated by more careful readers who are looking for undercurrents of meaning. It's a tragi-farcical romp in 19th century England, but it's also a warning about what people might do simply because they can get away with it. This is a classic that anyone interested in science fiction should read.
  • (4/5)
    An inventive & exciting story by one of the foremost Science Fiction authors of his era, whose literary fame encompasses Histories & Philosophy. Created from the serialized tale published in 1897 in a UK magazine, Pearson's Weekly, The Invisible Man as the title suggests has a main character Griffin who becomes invisible. Wells examines the good aspects & pitfalls of such a transformation with the emphasis on the downside as Griffin becomes increasingly erratic - no spoiler here - read it for the dramatic events and conclusion.
  • (3/5)
    *Spoilerish type reivew* This was a decent book by Wells, but my least favorite of the books I have read by him. This one obviously is a short novel about a man who is invisible. I thought the idea had a great deal of potential, but I never felt like the story ever took off for me. The Invisible Man is simply grumpy and perhaps a lunatic and the story turns into more of a chase down the bad guy plot. Not a bad read, but certainly not one to remember.
  • (4/5)
    Great read. Man.........this guy is a jerk. But I guess karma comes full circle.
  • (2/5)
    Het gegeven is natuurlijk fascinerend, maar de uitwerking valt tegen: traag en gebroken ritme. Lectuur opgegeven na 120 blz
  • (4/5)
    Surprisingly more action than I thought the novel would have (after reading the disappointing Jekyll & Hyde last year, anyway). The Invisible Man seems to be a bad dude. Definitely not a misunderstood villain, just because he is invisible, which is what I was expecting. This invisible man could have written the book on terrorism. I thought the plot kept its pace and was the perfect length. The writing itself wasn't as great as I wished though.