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The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man

Written by H. G. Wells

Narrated by Scott Brick


The Invisible Man

Written by H. G. Wells

Narrated by Scott Brick

ratings:
3.5/5 (81 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 11, 2008
ISBN:
9781400178575
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Once a brilliant scientist, Griffin has been gradually consumed by his research. When he finally achieves his goal-becoming completely invisible-the final result is his departure from humanity. He feels no remorse in using his invisibility to gratify his increasing desires. As he gradually loses his mind, it is hard to determine if it is a result of his chemical concoction or a simple continuation of his moral decline.



At a time when science fiction was depicting what wonders the future would bring, H. G. Wells was one of the first writers to explore the dark side of science and to portray how easily mortal man can be corrupted when tempted by seemingly unlimited power. First published in 1897, The Invisible Man helped establish Wells as one of the first and best writers of science fiction. Notable for its sheer invention, suspense, and psychological nuance, The Invisible Man continues to enthrall science fiction fans today.
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 11, 2008
ISBN:
9781400178575
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


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Reviews

What people think about The Invisible Man

3.6
81 ratings / 108 Reviews
What did you think?
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Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    Misanthropic and bereft of philosophy, it begins as farce and concludes in a homicidal froth. Pity.
  • (2/5)
    A disappointing read. H.G Wells has much better tales. I would not recommend wasting your time on this one.
  • (2/5)
    The Invisible Man was a jerk who was mean to people and tortured a cat. This pissed me off and has left my mentally incapable of leaving a more detailed review. I expected better.
  • (4/5)
    In H. G. Wells' classic novel, a scientist turns himself invisible and wreaks havoc in rural England. This book is a versatile classic because it could be read by someone who is young or who simply wants to read fluff, but it can also be appreciated by more careful readers who are looking for undercurrents of meaning. It's a tragi-farcical romp in 19th century England, but it's also a warning about what people might do simply because they can get away with it. This is a classic that anyone interested in science fiction should read.
  • (4/5)
    An inventive & exciting story by one of the foremost Science Fiction authors of his era, whose literary fame encompasses Histories & Philosophy. Created from the serialized tale published in 1897 in a UK magazine, Pearson's Weekly, The Invisible Man as the title suggests has a main character Griffin who becomes invisible. Wells examines the good aspects & pitfalls of such a transformation with the emphasis on the downside as Griffin becomes increasingly erratic - no spoiler here - read it for the dramatic events and conclusion.
  • (3/5)
    *Spoilerish type reivew* This was a decent book by Wells, but my least favorite of the books I have read by him. This one obviously is a short novel about a man who is invisible. I thought the idea had a great deal of potential, but I never felt like the story ever took off for me. The Invisible Man is simply grumpy and perhaps a lunatic and the story turns into more of a chase down the bad guy plot. Not a bad read, but certainly not one to remember.
  • (4/5)
    Great read. Man.........this guy is a jerk. But I guess karma comes full circle.
  • (2/5)
    Het gegeven is natuurlijk fascinerend, maar de uitwerking valt tegen: traag en gebroken ritme. Lectuur opgegeven na 120 blz
  • (4/5)
    Surprisingly more action than I thought the novel would have (after reading the disappointing Jekyll & Hyde last year, anyway). The Invisible Man seems to be a bad dude. Definitely not a misunderstood villain, just because he is invisible, which is what I was expecting. This invisible man could have written the book on terrorism. I thought the plot kept its pace and was the perfect length. The writing itself wasn't as great as I wished though.
  • (5/5)
    My first Wells book, and I must read more of his now. Much better than I had even guessed it would be.
  • (2/5)
    This is such a famous novel that I was expecting a far better read. The opening chapter, as a muffled mysterious stranger comes to an inn, asking for a room and to not be disturbed is full of promise. But the rest of the story was tedious, as the invisible man loses his temper, and seems only to want to revenge himself on others. What is fascinating is the title which captures the imagination. But Wells strangely concentrates on the downside of invisibility - having to be naked in cold weather, being unable to eat invisibly, having others bump into you, without having some fun plus side moments.So, a great idea, and I'm sure this is why the novel is 'a classic' - but none of the characters were particularly interesting, the invisible man himself plain peculiar, and what he gets up to bizarre and slow-moving.
  • (5/5)
    Still a great read.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent! A classic thriller.
  • (2/5)
    Het gegeven is natuurlijk fascinerend, maar de uitwerking valt tegen: traag en gebroken ritme. Lectuur opgegeven na 120 blz
  • (3/5)
    A classic that probably should be read. Story of a man with awesome power who is corrupted quickly and completely.
  • (4/5)
    I am such a geek. My favorite part of this book is the Invisible Man's brief lecture on how light and invisibility work, midway through the book. For a day, in the background of my brain I was designing camp curriculum's around it.

    So, H.G. Wells has a reputation for a reason. This book is compulsively readable, if a tad old-fashioned. It does suffer the problem of being a book in which the main character is impossible to like. Though it does serve as a rather thorough argument that invisibility is not a fantastic superpower to have, and that it certainly does not free you of your dependence on other human beings. If anything, it makes that dependency sharper. Also, how much of our trust of people hinges on being able to see their face?

    More pulp than psychological thriller, but I'm okay with that.
  • (4/5)
    Great book! by my favorite auther, Hubert George Wells (who has sadly been dead for a very long time)for sci-fi fans, you'll love this!
  • (3/5)
    I read The War of the Worlds a long time ago and I don't think I've really read any of Wells' other books until now, despite my intentions. I'm glad I finally got round to it. The Invisible Man isn't so much a story in some ways as an exploration of an idea -- not much happens, really: a man finds out how to make himself invisible but finds it much less convenient than expected, goes on a crime rampage, and is eventually killed. The main character is despicable and thoroughly unlikeable, which does the book no favours as a leisure read, but it's an interesting exploration of the idea. Though, of course, the 'scientific' explanation is laughable from a modern reader's perspective.

    For the little that happens it's quite long and unrewarding, but considering Wells' influence on the genre, it's interesting in that way, too.
  • (4/5)
    Disturbing tale of a lunatic who made himself invisible. A quick and engrossing read.
  • (2/5)
    All I can say is that I was extremely disappointed with this book after reading it. I came into it with such high expectations, and those expectations fell flat on their face. The idea(s) are there, but the execution tremendously lacked. There is barely any character development, and the story is told like a report in a newspaper. I understand that that may be the point and style of Wells, but I wasn't buying it.
  • (5/5)
    The Tragedy of the Invisible Man whose discovery should have gone into top ranking Research Institutions but all his genius is lost along the way.
    The Invisible Man Griffin is an academic who discovers the secret of becoming invisible, this happens and he is able to use it, but alas still struggles with the same struggles he had when he was not invisible, like rejection, loneliness, isolation, this he turns into a Reign of Terror of The Invisible Man on the Village where he lives because DEATH is the only weapon left that has any effect. The Death Weapon turns back on him and in the closing moments the Invisible Man is himself felled and his invisible secrets remain in perpetuity only to be discovered upon the deaths of visible humans.
  • (4/5)
    This is another book that I loved. I remember watching the movie long, long ago. This is a classic tale of a brilliant scientist who makes a wonderful discovery, and then loses his mind.The book was long in the build up, and did meander a bit. I liked it when the Invisible Man decided that he wanted to create a reign of terror. I would, personally, have loved a little more exploration of the subject at this point. The evil genius, the evil joker, are all subjects that have fascinated me for years. HGW was such a great writer, he would have been brilliant had he delved deeper into the mind of the scientist.
  • (3/5)
    This was a quick read. It wasn't bad, but it wasn't great. I was surprised that we didn't get to hear the invisible man's story until so far in. From the perspective and information given, it was like the fact that he was invisible was supposed to eventually strike us as a great surprise, but... it's called "The Invisible Man." Anyway, it did pick up once we finally heard his story.From the beginning, I wanted to like the invisible man, or at least to have some sympathy for him. Oh, maybe he has a reason for not wanting to talk to anybody, I hoped, but he was just a bad-tempered jerk from the start. I feel like the author could have addressed some deeper themes here if the story had been just a little different, but maybe it's just supposed to be more of a fun read.I did find the ideas about how he became invisible interesting-- the real science fiction part of it. I also laughed at one scene where he has a dreadful time trying to convince someone he's invisible, and the end was somewhat exciting.
  • (3/5)
    I didn't enjoy this one as much as Wells' two more famous books. I just couldn't get it out of my head that (spoiler alert?) for most of the book the Invisible Man had his Invisible Junk flopping around, making him far less menacing a villain than Wells intended.
  • (3/5)
    I have been re-discovering H G Wells in free Kindle downloads, though this is the first time I have read 'The Invisible Man'. The book is fascinating in its concept and of course it spawned almost an industry of adaptations and imitations including the TV series I remember from the 1960s featuring Peter Brady as the title character, though in an entirely different setting and conceit than the original.Here the title character is frustrated physicist Griffin who perfects a way of refracting light which, combined with some treatment of colour pigmentation (all very vaguely 'explained'), allows the character complete invisibility when naked, while retaining the solidity of the original human form. Griffin is initially delighted by his discovery which he imagines is going to give him the key to power and access in the world.He is soon disillusioned: the chapters devoted to Griffin naked on the streets of London trying to feed and clothe himself (having burned all his belongings) while trying to remain undetected are among the most powerful in the book. Griffin's reaction when he realises that his life as the Invisible Man is not going to be the idyll he imagined is a fury which leads to his determination to conduct a Reign of Terror against humanity.The Reign of Terror is shortlived. I won't give away the ending, though it's easier to spot than Griffin starkers. I was somewhat unsatisfied by it as I was by much of the book, though there are some gripping passages. The dialogue, especially in the 'crowd scenes',is clunky and false to the ear. The narrative is fast-paced but sometimes hobbled with clumsy prose. My main problem is with the character of Griffin himself who is portrayed as entirely amoral and thus never really engages the reader's sympathy even during his worst privations. I can understand why Wells chose this characterisation, as it sets up a sort of rationale for Griffin's deluded Reign of Terror, but I can't help feeling there is an opportunity missed by not developing a more rounded character, which could have given us a more mature reflection on the problems and moral dilemmas of Griffin's condition, and a more empathetic protagonist.I was going to end by saying that Griffin is two-dimensional, but I suppose it's more accurate to say he is no-dimensional - at least with his clothes off.
  • (3/5)
    My second H.G. Wells novel. Honestly, I didn't enjoy The Invisible Man quite as much as I did The War of the Worlds. The storyline and writing were both top notch, but I just found it hard to REALLY enjoy a novel in which I totally despised the main character. In all actuality, I guess my feelings towards the protagonist/antagonist (yes, both are the same character) would be considered a win for the author, as I feel that Wells didn't intend for the reader to truly like this character. What I find interesting is that as I was reading the novel, I did feel a bit of sympathy for the main character's plight from time to time, but then he would do something so over-the-top or horribly nasty that I would immediately lose any sympathetic feelings and replace them with something more akin to loathing. I did enjoy the novel for the most part though and Wells crafts a wonderful story that keeps the reader interested throughout. I found the science behind his explanation of events to be sufficient to carry the story especially considering the time in which it was written and think that this is another fine example of early Science Fiction before Science Fiction was actually defined as a genre.
  • (4/5)
    I always thought my first foray into H.G. Wells would be The War of the Worlds - but actually this made a fantastic starting point! A quick read, The Invisible Man is accessible, vivid and packs quite a punch along the way, and I really enjoyed it. It's about... well, an Invisible Man. Except when he first arrives in the little town of Iping, no one KNOWS he's an Invisible Man. Swathed in bandages, wearing gloves and heavy clothes, and with a hat and goggle-like glasses hiding his features, everyone assumes he's had a terrible accident. It's only when odd things begin to happen and the increasingly volatile gentleman is provoked into revealing his secret that all hell breaks loose. Is he a sympathetic victim or a murderous madman? Will he find someone to help him? How on earth did he reach this point in his life? How DOES a man render himself invisible anyway?What really surprised me, at least earlier on in the book, is how funny it is. The small-town characters are so amusing - Mr Marvel, the tramp, has some particularly good one-liners that made me chuckle - and some of their brilliantly observed little foibles are ones we all recognise even if we'd rather not admit to them! Nearer the end of the book the humour gives way largely to the Invisible Man's eloquently-told story and the melodramatic thrill of the chase, which was interesting but for me, not as enjoyable as the quick wit of the first half. Nevertheless, I'm very glad to have finally read this classic of science fiction writing - and I'm still looking forward to The War of the Worlds!
  • (4/5)
    This book is a famous thriller from the author H.G. Wells. All begins when a stranger arrives in the village of Iping, wearing a long coat, gloves and a hat, covered in bandages and hiding his eyes with dark glasses. Nobody knows about him and why his strange behavior. Then, his secret is discovered and begins a dramatic adventure. The story is a bit slow at the beginning, but then it's pretty interesting and exciting.
  • (3/5)
    In a time where modern storytelling is discussed in terms of spoiler alerts and twist-endings, it was hard for me to feel enthused about a book which answers its own mystery right in the title. In fact, I had carried around my Walmart published copy of this novel for the past 17 years, always picking it up out of a sense of historical literary obligation, only to put it back down immediately. A story about a man who was invisible. So what? By now it is an idea that has been done to death in both books and movies.So when I decided it was finally time to set my copy free back into the wild from whence it came, I said what the hell and hunkered down with it before we parted. And you know what? It is surprisingly a fun read.Wells is an able storyteller, and although the narrative clunks along a bit around the middle when Griffin explains to his old friend Kemp how he came to be invisible (both the suspiciously convenient arrival of this friend, as well as the overlong explanation of the science behind the invisibility are distancing and distracting) the story is surprisingly engrossing.As a fan-girl of all things British, in particular the Victorian era, I was especially taken with the period details including the narrative voice. To some readers this aspect of the novel will probably be a given, but I expected something more akin to modern science-fiction where the emphasis seems to be on taking a reader out of the commonplace. Here, Wells' third-person narrator sounds more like a peer of his realist counterparts, with great care and attention being placed on describing the mundane village setting of Iping and the insular, nosy life of the people in that community. This kind of subtle satire of small town communities is as lively as it is amusing.I do, however, feel that I have to subtract points for the unnecessarily prolonged reveal of poor Griffin's invisibility. Wells keeps the "surprise" from everyone, even the reader, which seems maddeningly coy, considering he knows that we know what's going on. But the slow build does create tension which plays out satisfyingly when things do start to move.Griffin as an anti-hero comes across as insane enough to be considered dangerous (the things he did to that poor stray cat!), but despondent enough to pity. And in a wonderful turning of the tables near the end (SPOILER ALERT!), when Kemp turns from the hunter to the hunted, we see how a kind of small town small-mindedness is perhaps more dangerous than a man no one can see. For a man does not have to turn himself invisible to be unseen and unloved.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a man that finds a way to turn invisible. At first he thinks that it could be fun, but then he finds that it is hard to live being invisible. He wants to find a way to reverse his own invention. Over time the people that are letting him stay at their house start to get suspicius about him being strange. They find out that he is invisible and gets the whole county chasing after him. This was a good book and I think that people that haven't read it should.