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The Prisoner of Heaven: A Novel

The Prisoner of Heaven: A Novel

Written by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

Narrated by Peter Kenny


The Prisoner of Heaven: A Novel

Written by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

Narrated by Peter Kenny

ratings:
4/5 (71 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jul 10, 2012
ISBN:
9780062208613
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Internationally acclaimed New York Times best-selling author Carlos Ruiz Zafon takes us into a dark, gothic Barcelona and creates a rich, labyrinthine tale of love, literature, passion, and revenge in which the heroes of The Shadow of the Wind and The Angel's Game must contend with a nemesis that threatens to destroy them.

Barcelona, 1957. It is Christmas, and Daniel Sempere and his wife, Bea, have much to celebrate. They have a beautiful new baby son named Julian, and their close friend Fermin Romero de Torres is about to be wed. But their joy is eclipsed when a mysterious stranger visits the Sempere bookshop and threatens to divulge a terrible secret that has been buried for two decades in the city's dark past. His appearance plunges Fermin and Daniel into a dangerous adventure that will take them back to the 1940's and the early days of Franco's dictatorship.

The terrifying events of that time launch them on a search for the truth that will put into peril everything they love and ultimately transform their lives.

A HarperAudio production.

Publisher:
Released:
Jul 10, 2012
ISBN:
9780062208613
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Carlos Ruiz Zafón is the author of eight novels, including the internationally bestselling and critically acclaimed Cemetery of Forgotten Books series: The Shadow of the Wind, The Angel’s Game, The Prisoner of Heaven, and The Labyrinth of the Spirits. His work, which also includes prizewinning young adult novels, has been translated into more than fifty languages and published around the world, garnering numerous awards and reaching millions of readers. He lives in Los Angeles.


Reviews

What people think about The Prisoner of Heaven

4.2
71 ratings / 76 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Finally - and I am sure I will love it!
  • (5/5)
    Continuing the story, pulling some loose ends together and unraveling othersMy third book in a binge read of the Cemetery of lost books series. Some questions raised by prior volumes are answered and the background of characters fleshed out. Ruiz says he tries to create scenes as in a movie and the books hang together almost like the serials at Saturday Matinees of yore.Was David Martin Crazy or not. Was his ‘the boss’ the devil? Not answered here, but the suggestion that the next volume will reveal more answers. I find my effort to keep track of people and places is helping me to fit the whole story together. On to the Labrynth.
  • (4/5)
    A really good read, the most undemanding installment of The Cemetery of Forgotten Books series.
  • (5/5)
    Christmas in Barcelona in 1957. Daniel Sempere and his friend Fermin Romero de Torres embark upon an adventure that will take them back to the early days of Franco's dictatorship.
    A beautifully written book, full of intrigue, terror, passion and joy. THE PRISONER OF HEAVEN is part of a series of books set in the literary universe of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books. Those who have read SHADOW OF THE WIND and THE ANGEL'S GAME will once more be captivated by Carl Ruiz Zafon's magical world.
  • (4/5)
    I'm currently making my way through Zafon's Cemetery of Forgotten Books series back-to-back, the first two of which were re-reads for me, but this and the last in the series are/will be first time reads. The Prisoner of Heaven is a much shorter book than the other three, and it takes place more or less right after the ending of The Shadow of the Wind. Fermin is preparing to wed Bernarda. However, prior to the wedding, a strange man enters the Sempere bookshop, triggering Fermin's memories of the past, which he shares with Daniel. Thus, the majority of this book centers around Fermin's past history, prior to the time that he met Daniel. Once again, Zafon brings to life some of Barcelona's darker secrets. We find out some more detail about Daniel's mother, Isabella, and her death. David Martin, the main character in The Angel's Game, is also a significant player in this one, although rather than clearing up some of the unanswered questions from that novel, it creates even more about his character.I'm somewhat unsure how I feel about this third installment of the series. While it was nice to read some of Fermin's history and some other background information, I didn't feel the magic in this one as I have with the other two previous novels and I was left feeling unsatisfied. While I've not yet read the last novel in the series, my gut feeling is that this one acts as a bridge between the other three, and I'm hoping I won't fully appreciate it until I've finished them all. I think, also, that the audiobook narrator for this one could've been much better, and I suspect that played a part in my feelings of dissatisfaction.
  • (4/5)
    A very decent third book in the Cemetery of Forgotten Books series, if we can call it a series given that Zafon tends to play fast and loose with the chronology of events. Not as fabulous as The Shadow of the Wind, but a definite improvement over the second book (which had the appearance of being a prequel). In The Prisoner of Heaven, Zafron is back to the wonderful labyrinthine, Gothic storytelling I fell in love with when reading The Shadow of the Wind. While Daniel is back in this book, this time it is very much Fermin’s story and his mysterious past. Zafon, obviously a fan of Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo – which happens to be one of my all-time favorite reads – takes inspiration from Dumas for the basis of Fermin’s story as a political prisoner in the dark and foreboding Montjuic Castle during Franco’s dictatorship. Zafron is very good at creating atmosphere in his stories, I will give him that. Even better, the author makes some decent connections to the first two books, so that The Angel’s Game doesn’t continue to stick out like a sore thumb. On a downside, Zafon plays messes with information from the earlier books, suddenly giving Fermin a stronger connection to Daniel’s family than originally provided, leaving Daniel to experience some “Say, what!?” moments. Also, Zafon’s female characters have not improved. They continue to come across as a mystery for the male characters to either pity, avenge or suspect of being up to something. There is a strange, token chapter told from Bea (Daniel’s wife) and Bernarda (Fermin’s fiancé) POV that adds, IMO, virtually nothing to the story. Maybe Zafon was asked to include more female character interaction, I don’t know. It just doesn’t work for me. This time, Zafon wraps up with a really solid cliff hanger for the next book in the series. I don’t always like cliff hanger endings. For me, it seems as though the author is attempting to milk a book deal made with the publisher (“Really, I can squeeze another best seller out of this!”) and I don’t like being used as a pawn, but I am intrigued enough to add the next book (which is already out) to my “to read” list. Overall, a decent read if you, like me, are able to enjoy a somewhat flawed story that is stylized with wonderful Gothic atmosphere, mise en scène and is an ode of sorts to Barcelona and wonderful writers like Dumas.