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Around the World in 80 Days: Timeless Classics

Around the World in 80 Days: Timeless Classics


Around the World in 80 Days: Timeless Classics

ratings:
4/5 (77 ratings)
Length:
1 hour
Released:
Jan 1, 2011
ISBN:
9781612474960
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Phileas Fogg must be insane. No one has ever been able to circle the globe in 80 days! Yet he's bet his friends that he'll do just that. Half of his fortune is on the line… and the outcome looks far from certain.

Released:
Jan 1, 2011
ISBN:
9781612474960
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Jules-Gabriel Verne war ein französischer Schriftsteller. Er wurde geboren am 8. Februar 1828 in Nantes und verstarb am 24. März 1905 in Amiens.

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4.0
77 ratings / 86 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Best book ever!!! For me, no book is better than this one!
  • (5/5)
    Not the best adaption in the world - large chunks of the journey are left out, but perfect for reading aloud in the car for kids.
  • (4/5)
    The imperturbable Mr Fogg traverses the world in 80 days all while upholding the grandest tradition of English stiff-upper-lipedness. Not really sure why this is on the 1001 list.
  • (4/5)
    Despite the idea of a hot air balloon ride being so associated the story in most peoples' minds there is no hot air balloon ride in the actual book.Phileas Fogg remains completely calm through out the story.His servant Passepartout is the much more emotional. Passepartout is the person I identified with throughout the story.
  • (5/5)
    If your idea of this story is based on the Jackie Chan bullshit, I feel sorry for you. Even the original film depiction isn't wholly accurate, and misses some interesting parts. As Michael Palin proved, the journey (when limited to the modes of travel then available, and along the same course) is actually possible, if extremely difficult. There were times when I would root for Phileas Fogg and Passepartout, mostly in encounters with dicks like Detective/Inspector Fix. I never looked down upon Passepartout, and his encounter with Mormons was fucking hilarious. Phileas Fogg, however, is snobbish to the extreme, with jingoistic sense of ultra Britishness (though his rescue of Aouda wasn't of that sort, and actually quite brave). He was never a bad person, he just needed to get over himself — which, thanks to Aouda, he starts to do at the novel's end.
  • (3/5)
    I listened to the Librivox recording by Mark Smith, which I found to be acceptable but not great. He did a fairly uninflected narration, so some folks may like it better than I did.As for the book itself, it was a cross between an adventure story and a travel book. It moved quite quickly from place to place, but it never really captured me. I also missed the humor that I recall from the movie version of this story...
  • (5/5)
    Jules Verne is considered one of the early authors of the sci-fi genre. While Around the World in Eighty Days may not immediately fit our mold of "science fiction", when you figure that this was originally written in 1873, the science involved is pretty significant even if it is all based on accurate science rather than fanciful imaginations. Prior to reading, I knew the basic story and characters but not much more than that. Eccentric and meticulously orderly Phileas Fogg places a bet with members of his social club that he can travel around the world in 80 days. The date is chosen based on a loose claim listed in the newspaper based on the outlined timetables for trains and ships.The first thing I found interesting was the character of Phileas Fogg. Based solely on my knowledge of the plot, I had expected him to be some wild and crazy madcap character with all sorts of outrageous behavior. Instead, Verne spends the first many pages showing us that Fogg is very much a creature of habit with ordinary behaviors. If anything, Fogg is a bit boring as a character. He has a precise daily and weekly schedule dictating when he wakes, when he sleeps, when he eats and everything he does in between. He doesn't have any extravagant hobbies or pastimes and doesn't do much of anything to engage in social events of the day. His flippant and sudden placing of the bet seems out of character and is quickly followed by quick adaptation to a new schedule as he immediately rushes home from his club, packs a quick bag, grabs his servant and proceeds to his first destination. Even in his quick trip, we seldom see him Fogg rushing or impetuous in any way. He is the picture of calm even as his trip faces adversity.As a contrast to Fogg, his servant Passepartout is a very emotional character full of as much passion and frustration as Fogg is full of calm. Passepartout is stymied by his master's wager but rushes along with him on the adventure, excited to see the world. He is dismayed as he realizes that the whirlwind tour will result primarily in him seeing the cabins of ships or trains and very little of the world they're passing through. With each obstacle that comes their way, Passepartout practically shrieks in frustration and really adds to the sense of suspense and tension in the adventure. He is a great counter to Fogg's character and really helped make the book more entertaining.Beyond the effects of nature or problems with transportation, the main obstacle facing Fogg is Inspector Fix from Scotland Yard. The Bank of England has recently been robbed by a man matching Fogg's description. When set alongside Fogg's erratic change in behavior and his willingness to throw insane sums of money at ship's captains and train engineer's, there is a very strong argument that Fogg could be the thief. Verne very carefully keeps details of the robbery hidden and makes sure that we are closely aligned with Fix's prejudices and beliefs. I had a hard time deciding whether or not Fogg was truly the bank thief or if it was merely an unfortunate coincidence. The interactions with Fix are humorous but distanced. Fix is waiting for his arrest warrant to arrive and until then he tries to stay just out of site of Fogg while also delaying his progress so that the warrant will catch up with them and allow an arrest to be made. The entire situation leads to some rather funny encounters.I really enjoyed the meticulous way in which Verne outlines the voyage. We sit with Fogg as he consults timetables and records his progress. There is a very careful accounting of days, weeks and hours. Alongside this, and usually alongside Passepartout rather than Fogg, Verne presents some fun narrative and adventures that give insight into a variety of different locations and cultures. For the late 19th century this was surely a lot of the novelty and appeal of the story. Even in the 21st century I applaud his presentation of these distant cultures. The technology and ideas are a bit dated, but there is still a sense of wonder, education and enjoyment that goes beyond the years.My biggest complaint comes in the final section of the novel.SPOILER ALERT - this next paragraph contains a spoiler about Fogg's eventual completion of his tripWhen Fogg finally returns to London after overcoming numerous obstacles in amazing ways, he is distraught. Upon consulting his trusty notebook, he finds that he is at exactly 80 days. However, the wager included a TIME of day to ensure the voyage was completed in precisely 80 days of 24 hours. Unfortunately it looks as though Fogg has arrived a few minutes late. Rather than return to the club and consult his friends and concede defeat, Fogg returns home with his companions and goes to sleep. The next day he mopes about most of the day and then later sends Passepartout on an errand. Passepartout returns frantically informing his master that an error has been made and TODAY is the end of the wager and that if Fogg hurries, he can make it to the club in time. Fogg races through the streets to arrive at the club and win the bet. The reason for the miscalculation is presented by Verne essentially as the fact that Fogg traveled Eastward around the globe and crossed the "date line" effectively losing a calendar day and traveling a full 24-hours for free. This is all well and good and scientifically sound...where the problem breaks down for me is the fact that the original bet included a DATE on which Fogg should return. And every leg of the journey, Fogg is consulting time tables many times involving identifying the day and date that a transport will depart. Even as Fogg leaves the East coast of the U.S., day numbers are presented. As such, the exact DATE is perfectly known to Fogg and his companions. Thus, even if he did tally off 81 "days" of 24 hours in his notebook, it would have been VERY clear that they were right on time simply by consulting the timetables, the newspaper or any other item that they frequently looked at. The twist/surprise ending was entertaining but the logic of it fell apart for me.END OF SPOILEROverall I really enjoyed the story. It was a fun adventure with some great details and wonderful characters. The writing was engaging and the plot was a lot of fun. As I mentioned before, even though aspects of the science and technology are certainly dated (after all, you can now travel around the world in a single day), they are a joy to read and make me want to seek out more books from this father of science fiction.*****4.5 out of 5 stars
  • (4/5)
    Loved the audio for this - read by the wonderful Jim Dale. Such a great classic tale!
  • (3/5)
    Although I like the premise--going around the world. However, it felt more like Verne portraying England as amazing and everywhere else...not. This includes showing barbaric rituals and getting into fights as soon as he sets foot on US soil.

    I think that might be the only thing I got out of this book: England rocks, English colonies, better than non English colonies but not as good as England itself...and America...really lame.
  • (3/5)
    A very fun Victorian adventure - with all the baggage that entails. It's a cliché, but I do wish that I had read this earlier or during a more stressful part of my life. As it was, I didn't really engage with it very well. While it was certainly well executed, I'm still kind of surprised that this one made it on to the 1001. Mostly because when I think of Jules Verne I think of science fiction and this is one of his least scientific works. Of course Verne himself spends this entire book praising the English when he was French. So nothing is quite what you expect.
  • (4/5)
    Good book, fun (if long...) movie. Will he make it? It's how it is actually done that makes it a hoot.
  • (5/5)
    Reading this as an adult, I realise how oddly written it is. Most of it is told at such a high level that critical scenes are reported to the reader rather than shown. As a result the pace rips along. Sometimes I wanted Verne to slow down and give me more detail, but he never does; everything is sacrificed to pace. It's story story story and you're slightly isolated from the characters. Which is interesting because the characters are all isolated in some way by a lack of communication; Passepartout doesn't tell Fogg about Fix's true identity, Fix isn't who he says he is, Aouda doesn't tell Fogg about her feelings and Fogg hardly says a word to anyone. A most strange book and thoroughly enjoyable.
  • (3/5)
    In what is a very odd case of cognitive dissonance, the plot of the Jackie Chan movie (which bears very little resemblance to the original here) actually makes more sense than the book. However, this is an entertaining travelogue with wacky characters and a crazy plot. Think of it as the "classics" version of a non-sensical thriller.
  • (4/5)
    An easy enjoyable read, marred somewhat by the prejudices that come through.
  • (4/5)
    For Christmas, I ordered an mp3 player that was pre-loaded with 100 works of classic literature in an audio format. Each work is in the public domain and is read by amateurs, so the quality of the presentation is hit or miss. This was the second novel I’ve completed (the first being A Tale of Two Cities) and like the first, the reader, though not excellent, did not detract from the experience.Around the World in 80 Days follows the adventures of English gentleman Phileas Fogg and his man servant Passepartout as they attempt to circumnavigate the globe within 80 days, Fogg having wagered a large sum of money with his club friends that he could do so. The story is set in the late 19th century, involving transportation by steamer, sailing ship, railroad (and elephant), across the Indian and North American sub-continent as well as the Mediterranean Sea, Suez Canal, South China Sea and the Indian, Pacific, Atlantic Oceans. As you can imagine, Fogg’s itinerary is planned to the minute and permits no lost time of any sort if the bet is to be won. Clearly, world travel in the 19th century promises no such trouble free experience.Written by Jules Verne, I enjoyed the book, but became a little bit fatigued with the succession of last minute escapes, the contrivances of Detective Fix and the unlikely events that always kept Fogg just barely “alive” to win his bet, though the ending was good and believable (though I had already figured it out). Not a bad audio book to listen to as you drive down the road.
  • (3/5)
    It's Jules Verne. It's not fabulous - but it's not bad either. It was a fairly easy read. Nothing to rave about.
  • (2/5)
    At no point does Phileas Fogg or Passepartout get in an air balloon. Lies, all lies.
  • (4/5)
    I always thought I knew the plot of this classic, but the more I read, the more I realised that I didn’t! I never knew about the policeman who was on Phileas Fogg’s case, for instance, nor of the young Indian woman they rescue from impending death. A fun adventure.
  • (4/5)
    I’d been meaning to read this for some time and I’m glad I finally have because I really enjoyed it. Phileas Fogg is a gentleman of habit and a stickler for punctuation. He follows his routine to the letter until one day when he makes a bet in his club that he can travel around the world in 80 days – and so begins his epic adventure.

    I really liked the character of Phileas Fogg. He is sometimes cool in his behaviour (and I don’t mean in terms of the modern definition of cool!) and doesn’t always show his emotions, but I think that is how someone of his class, and certainly at the time it was set, would have behaved. Despite his reserve, he clearly shows he does have feelings with his behaviour towards the people he meets along the way, particularly his rescue of Aouda and also the rescue from the Sioux of Passepartout, which put the chances of winning his bet in severe doubt.

    Fogg himself is a stereotypical eccentric upper-class gent, who spends all day at his club. I also think that many of the characters and countries that Fogg visited along the way were quite stereotypical, although I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing. Aouda’s characterisation might be considered slightly atypical in how one might think of an Indian woman in the late nineteenth century would behave, and I liked that aspect of the book.

    I didn’t realise it was a children’s book until I looked on Wikipedia after reading it – it didn’t feel like one to me, but I guess that’s because of the time it was written, although it is an easy read. I enjoyed reading about the places and cultures he visited, and this is one of those books that makes me head to Wikipedia and look up various subjects encountered along the way – I love books that make me want to find out more!

  • (5/5)
    I read this book awhile ago so this review is not going to go into to much detail about what I liked and what I didn't like. However there is nothing about this book that I remember disliking.

    I loved it. I stayed up all night reading it- it helped that I have never seen any of the movies or met anyone else that has read this book (OK I don't actually know if that is true I guess some of my teachers had probably read this book but I haven't spoken about this book with anyone else who read it.) and, because of that, I had no idea what was going to happen in the end or even during the book. I thought it was all very entertaining- it was one of the first classics I read without being told to.

    When I finished it I said to myself, "Wow that was a good book." I love reading but that doesn't happen often for me (I can only think of two other books that have had that effect on me).

    I recommend this book to everyone but especially people who like adventure stories or classics.
  • (4/5)
    Nook
    4 stars
    A wager to make a trip around the world in just 80 days starting from London. The journey takes advantage of several types of transportation. The author describes the people and the land but also math, science and new discoveries and inventions. It was fun to read this book written in the late 1800s. A very good adventure story and even a love story.
  • (4/5)
    Book Description
    Taking up a challenge from his whist partners, a mysterious English gentleman named Phileas Fogg wagers half his fortune and abandons his quiet domestic routine to undertake a daring feat: to circle the globe in a mere 80 days, an achievement unheard of in the Victorian world.
    Fogg and Passepartout, his devoted manservant, avail themselves of virtually every known means of transportation in their wild race against time. All the while, a devious detective dogs their every step and introduces fresh obstacles. The resourceful Fogg faces each new trial with unshakable aplomb, through a constantly shifting background of exotic locales — from the jungles of India, a Chinese opium den, and a Japanese circus to a full-throttle train ride under attack by Sioux and a bloodless mutiny aboard a tramp steamer.
    The most popular of Jules Verne's fantastic adventure stories, Around the World in Eighty Days first appeared as a newspaper serial in 1872, much to the delight of a world already agog with recent advances in technology. Its enduring blend of comic misadventures and thrilling suspense continues to enchant generations of readers.

    My Review
    This travel novel has great adventure stories about the different cities visited. The characters are well-developed and lovable.The different places of the world were written about in a way that must have been experienced by the author. It was amusing to read how the author portrayed America and its people. The ending was quite surprising and a great conclusion to the book. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys traveling.
  • (4/5)
    A literary standard if you want to judge a book by its enjoyment level as opposed to its "literary quality."
  • (4/5)
    I read the Project Gutenberg version of this, in the end: I don't know who translated it, but the translation was really quite nice. I enjoyed this book more than I expected to. For all that he bribes his way around the world, really, Phileas Fogg has some interesting adventures, including saving a lovely young woman and commandeering a ship. I thought the characters were all quite fun. There are stereotypes and so on, and it's very very biased toward all things English, seemingly, but knowing about that in advance, I could ignore it.

    I loved the end a lot more than I expected to. I thought it was clever, and I enjoyed seeing a softer side of Phileas Fogg (one that I had, of course, been suspecting for a while).
  • (4/5)
    Wonderful narrator and includes some music from the movie. There is 7 hours and 53 minutes of listening. Phileas Fogg is the main character who wages a bet with his friends from his club that he could go around the world in 80 days. The bet was a considerable fortune and considering the time period of the 1870's, it would be an almost impossible feat. Mr. Fogg, with his attention to precise detail had quiet confidence that he would be able to be back at his club at 8:45 pm in exactly 80 days. Along the way, a Scotland Yard policeman Mr. Fix, decides Mr. Fogg is in reality a thief and decides it is his duty to follow Mr. Fog and arrest him if he can. Is Phileas Fogg a thief? His character shows great courage and so the reader is left to find out if wealthy Mr. Fogg is a thief and if he will win his bet.Much better than the movie!!!!!!!
  • (4/5)
    As I recall this book was a lot of fun! Oddly enough I have yet to see either of the movies, but the original Mike Todd one is "in my queue." Because of my lack of interest in "hard science fiction" it's the only Jules Verne book I've read, but it appears he was a good storyteller based on that.
  • (5/5)
    I love Jules Verne. He's a ton of fun to read. The adventure stuff is fun, of course, but he also creates awesome characters. Nemo's probably his best-known, but the supremely phlegmatic Phineas Fogg of this book is nearly as memorable. His complete disinterest in exploring the places he passes through is sortof anathema to me, but maybe that's what makes him so fascinating; when I think of traveling around the world, it's with the purpose of seeing it, whereas he sees the entire thing simply as a series of obstacles to be overcome. It's remarkable in its pointlessness; at the end of the trip he has gained no money and experienced little of the cultures he's passed through. He made the trip solely to prove he could do it. (Sure, there's that one gain he seems pleased by at the end, but he hardly planned for that, so it has to be removed as a motive.)

    The only thing I remembered about this story was that the climax involves a hot air balloon, which turns out not to be true. So that was a surprise.

    ps phlegmatic is my new word. This book taught it to me. I'm gonna use it all the time. Sweet.
  • (5/5)
    So much fun! Phileas Fogg has definitely become one of my favorite characters of fiction ever, and Jules Verne proves to be far more interesting than I expected. I will definitely be looking into his other Voyages Extraordinaires.
  • (3/5)
    Verne's tale of a 19th century Englishman's travels around the world is most notable for its depiction of local cultures now far gone. Often quaint, sometimes humorous and occasionally a bit too dated for the modern reader. Hardly a great work, but still a fun read.
  • (4/5)
    I read this classic without actually knowing anything about it other than title and author. The adventure aspect was more or less what I expected, but the humor was quite unexpected, and much appreciated. Passepartout, and to a lesser degree Detective Fix, provide a constant stream of humor throughout the novel.Phileas Fogg has made a bet with the members of his "gentleman's club" that he can circumnavigate the world and be back in the club within 80 days. Setting off with his newly hired valet, Passepartout, he is followed by Detective Fix, who is certain that Mr Fogg has robbed the bank of England and is seeking escape.This is not a classic in the sense of having any profound themes, symbolism or hidden meanings. It is a light, humorous, fun adventure story, well told.(Minor spoiler note: Look at the many cover art options available in Library Thing. Many of them feature balloons... one of the few modes of transport never mentioned in the book at all! The cover that best illustrates the book is actually the Apple Classics children's version for Scholastic.)