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The Call of the Wild: Timeless Classics

The Call of the Wild: Timeless Classics


The Call of the Wild: Timeless Classics

ratings:
4/5 (50 ratings)
Length:
1 hour
Released:
Jan 1, 2011
ISBN:
9781612474977
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Buck is much bigger and stronger than the other dogs. But he wasn't born to the savage life of the Alaskan frontier. Is it too late for him to learn the "law of club and fang"? Can he survive the bitter weather, a vicious rival, and the deadly mistakes of his bungling owners?

Released:
Jan 1, 2011
ISBN:
9781612474977
Format:
Audiobook


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What people think about The Call of the Wild

3.9
50 ratings / 119 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    I read this book in Danish when I was about 10, and it made a strong lasting impression. For that reason I'll give it at least 4 stars, although don't know how I would had rated it if I had read it as an adult.
  • (3/5)
    Classic story of a wold-dog hybrid named White Fang. It's kind of the reversal of Jack London's other work "The Call of the Wild" wherein the animal starts off in human society and goes feral. White Fang is born wild and ends up with a beloved master. The point appears to be that nature is savage and brutal ("Eat or be eaten!"), and that man can be even more savage and brutal, or let the power of love and gentleness overcome.
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful writing about the life of a dog/wolf in the Yukon. Life in the wild changes as White Fang is first "owned" by an Indian, later by a terrible man named Beauty Smith who makes him into a fighting dog, and last by a kind man who becomes very attached to the dog.
  • (4/5)
    Pros: this is a lovely, lovely book. It follows the tale of an Alaskan wolf from birth to his meeting with a human who shows him compassion and love, forming a bond stronger than any he's formed in his life. Beautifully written, evenly paced, it's classic Jack London.Cons: I'm pretty sure this book was at least partly responsible for starting the whole "OMG I LUV WOLFZ!!!" trend among our young people in the last few years. Especially teenage girls. I'm talking about the kind who talk about how beautiful and majestic wolves are and how ugly and awful humans are and they would just love to live with the wolves forever. Urgh.Also, I guess you could interpret some mild racial stereotyping in that White Fang's first master is a native who becomes an alcoholic.For these two offenses, I deduct one star. But it's still a great little novel.
  • (5/5)
    I read this book a few years ago, and have constantly gone back to it because I just enjoyed the story and London's style of writing that much. 
  • (5/5)
    A gentle, well cared for family dog named Buck is stolen, sold, and shipped to Alaska and turned into a sled dog. It is quickly determined by most who come in contact with him that he is unique. Treated cruelly by most, and kind by few, he eventually finds freedom. A beautifully written story.
  • (4/5)
    This rating is not just for Call of the Wild, but for "To Build A Fire", which was in this edition of the book as well.

    I felt that CofW was a really good read--even if at times I cringed at the pain and suffering Buck went through. To see how his life is altered by the humans he was kidnapped and 'broken' by is interesting, and kept me enthralled. It is not a long book (novella?), but one that kept me wanting more.

    Fire was a great story that had me wanting to see how the idiotic human would react...and ultimately face his demise from not listening to those more experienced in the Alaskan wilderness than himself.

    After reading both stories, I really wonder if London was a fan of Alaska, or if he found it to be the most base of human (and animal) existence. I can say for certain that if I had ever held Alaska as a "must see", I now do not.

    Too savage for me! But definitely worth reading, both stories.
  • (4/5)
    The Call of the Wild by Jack LondonHad read this in high school and trying to get my husband into reading and he had read White Fang so thought he'd enjoy this one.Figured we could read along with one another, out loud. Well ok we each read it at our own pace.Story is about Buck, a dog that is sold and ends up getting beatten and transported to Alaska, the time frame of the Klondike gold rush.He learns fast when he gets hurt-how to go along with things that are happening so he can heal. When he meets up with the other dogs in the harnesseshe learns again how to survive in the snow-which is new to him. and how to dig a hole to stay warm overnight. Love the tip about sleeping on the leeward side of the wind.Good instincts as he is thrown into the pack and new territory for them all. Especially liked the travel and was able to follow along as it gave city names and other landmarks.Lessons learned, the hard way usually for not only the dogs but Buck and his owners, over time. Loved the scenes where Mercades and her crew lost all their belongings all over the main street.Laughed so hard and they just didn't get it. Loved also the part where a human comes to the dogs rescue by not letting him get beatten to death.Lots of action and adventure and travel. Buck gets so lost and battered he falls into a state of mind where he no longer feels the pain. He still has the urge to go with his fellow dogs when he hears them but he wants to stay with the human that saved his life.Loved the northern lights. Interesting that my husband read his version of this at the same time and we are able to discuss different aspects of what is happening. Will have to find more of this type to read, together.
  • (5/5)
    Wrong edition, but after going through 10 pages of different editions with no end in sight, I got tired. Mine is by Random House in 2009 & read by Jeff Daniels (the star of Newsroom on HBO). Daniels' reading of this story is FANTASTIC.

    I let far too many years go by between reads of this story. London paints a wonderfully brutal picture of the Klondike gold rush as seen in relation to Buck. He doesn't anthropomorphize terribly, but I found the hereditary memories of the primitive man a bit much. Still, the point of the title was well made.

    I found Buck's breeding to be especially pleasing. One of my best dogs was a Great Dane/mostly Shepard cross. Maverick looked like a really big, relatively short haired German Shepard & had more personality than most people. He was sweet as could be to 'his' people & animals, while he was pure death to any predator or other varmint. He would literally lay next to a lost chick & howl in despair. He carried an orphaned kitten in his mouth around the house for weeks until it was big enough to get around by itself, but killed many racoons, groundhogs, possums, & a weasel with one snap. (Oh, this is supposed to be about the book. Sorry, but Mav deserves to be remembered.

    I got it wrong in my review of "The Sea Wolf" where I said London didn't think of wolves as a social animal. He did, in their own society. It's just that they were at odds with ours.

    Anyway, this was obviously a classic that really hit home. It's not a terribly happy story. In fact, it's brutal, but fantastic. I can't recommend it highly enough, especially this particular version.
  • (2/5)
    It was ok. It's no White Fang.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book when I was a freshman in hih school and while I have nor surviving record of what I thought about it when I read it mymemory is that I liked it a lot.
  • (3/5)
    I always thought I had read this but I guess I confused it with White Fang. Got it on audio to listen to with my daughter (11) on a long car ride and we loved it. The entire story is told from the point of view of Buck, a St. Bernard/German Shepherd mix, who ends up in the Alaskan wilderness and becomes a thing of legends. Now, to get White Fang.
  • (5/5)
    I had never read anything by Jack London before, and felt pretty guilty about that fact, so I picked up The Call of the Wild on audiobook and loved it. The prose was elegant in its simplicity, the pacing was quick and engaging, and I felt Buck wasn't made too human.

    Excellent read. I would recommend it to anyone.
  • (4/5)
    Buck is a dog, jerked from a life of comfort and easy living, sold to a messenger who makes deliveries by dog sled across the cold wilds of Alaska. Buck changes, becomes stronger, fiercer, braver, bolder.
  • (4/5)
    When Buck is taken from his comfortable home, sold as a work dog, and sent to Alaska, his whole world changes. Brutality and hard work. Cold and crazy men. All of these forever change Buck's nature. As his instincts take over, can Buck continue to exist in the world that his various owners have brought him into?I went into this book with no expectations and was blown away by the writing. London's prose is gorgeous and rich; I found myself relishing each sentence and the language he uses to perfection. I also was impressed that the novel is told from Buck's perspective but never comes to a point of anthropomorphization nor is it saccharine. The novel doesn't shy away from the brutality of the life of men who went in search of gold in Alaska and London never pulls punches when describing animal cruelty. But don't let the harshness frighten you away. There are also wonderful passages depicting the special bond that form between animals and their people. A short classic that pleasantly surprised me.
  • (5/5)
    My first book ever to read when I started Middle school. One of my favorite lit books. Its a great book because it plays on all the different level of the readers' feelings. Sometimes I felt angry, sad, and some chapter and plot made me happy, excited. Overall I recommend it for anyone who needs to get into reading this book will make you want to read more.
  • (5/5)
    I rated this book a 9 out of 10. It is a great adventure story about a dog, and thus little or no dialogue takes place.
  • (3/5)
    A great story of the struggle between tame and wild. A true classic that everyone should read. Great for the younger generations.
  • (4/5)
    Stolen from his home and sold to dog sled outfitters, Buck hears his call and is forever changed…for his better. Makes one think about his personal callings and decisions.
  • (4/5)
    Jack London's "Call of the Wild" follows the journey of one dog as he laboriously toils in the artic regions of Canada and comes closer and closer to answering his true calling. The main character, a mixed breed dog named Buck, is pulled suddenly away from his life in domesticated society and is sold into the strenuous world of dog sledding. He goes through many hard experiences and learns valuable lessons about the primitive world and the "Law of Club and Fang." He often finds himself either at the receiving end of harsh blows from the club or in fights to the death with his fellow teammates as tries to assert his dominance among them. He is continuously passed from owner to owner and suffers through different experiences with each. Each step he takes as sled dog makes him less and less of a domestic animal and more of a "thing of the wild." He begins to acquire some of the traits of his ancestors, such as acting on impulse, while all the while wrestling whether or not to give into the call of the wild. "The Call of the Wild" relates to our Search for Self theme because the main character, Buck, spends the entire novel taking steps that bring him closer towards reconnecting with his inner "beast." In a way, the novel is similar to "The Alchemist" in that Buck is called towards his destiny in the wild, but must choose whether to answer that call or remain tied to humans and the domestic world. In this book, the idea of "self" mainly equates to the awakening of Buck's ancestors within himself, and his longing to enter into the primitive world. He spends a great deal of time searching in the forest for the source of what drives him there in the first place. As I began reading the novel, I quickly learned that the book was not what I had expected it to be. It was extremely graphic, to say the least. Each chapter featured some sort of brutality against Buck or the other dogs as they were either beaten mercilessly with a club, starved to death and killed with an ax, or ripped savagely apart by their fellow teammates. I typically hate to read, watch, hear, or see any form of animal abuse (I know, I'm such a girl...) so it was really hard for me to concentrate on the message within the story while all this torture and death was going on. Moving past the graphic parts, however, I thought the novel overall was very compelling and intriguing. I loved the way the story was written and the ability of the narrator to be in Buck's shoes and feel what he was feeling without actually having Buck do any physical talking either mentally or verbally. Since dogs obviously can't talk, this feature made the novel seem more realistic, yet still formulated a strong bond between the reader and Buck. Many of the reviews on this site have said that they read this book in high school as a requirement, and I can see why. It was a simple, quick read that still was chalk full of advanced literary elements and techniques that could be included in a literary analysis chart. I would recommend it to anyone who wouldn't mind reading all the graphic details and who was looking for something to read and finish relatively quickly.
  • (4/5)
    Buck's journey from domestic dog, to sled dog, to wolf. Aspects of nobility in returning to nature and civilisation as superior to 'wildness' mixed in a way that I found a little hard to reconcile, maybe colonialism?
  • (5/5)
    Stolen from his family home in California, whipped and brutalized, the big dog Buck quickly learns the harsh law of survival among the men and dogs of the gold-crazed North. He goes to the Klondike during the 1897 gold rush, becomes a sled dog, and fights his way to become a feared leader, even killing his rival. When he finds the one man he can love and trust, they make a formidable team. But ultimately Buck's instincts draw him to join the wild wolves of the north.
  • (4/5)
    London, Jack The Call of the Wild. Illust. by Pablo Marcos Studio. Waldman, 1989; original story, 1903. 239p. Intermediate/Middle schoolIn 1897, Buck, a dog from California, is kidnapped from his home and taken to the Klondike where he is made into a sled dog. After loss and abuse, he answers the call of the wild and runs away to become the leader of a wolf pack. Narrative point of view telling a fast-paced , descriptive tale. The tone of the story is often dark and frightening but moving. The theme is survival.AK: Sled dogs, wolves, snow and ice, SkagwayActivity: Ask children if they have seen a sled dog team. If so, where? What was it like? If they haven’t, would they like to? Would they want to ride on a dog sled?
  • (2/5)
    The writing is strong and beautiful, and I suffered through it 'til the very end. I just can't handle the blood and abuse.
  • (4/5)
    One I haven't read, but plan to. It has several pastel colored illustrations.
  • (2/5)
    being a cat person it might have been a mistake to read a book about a dog. the dog was terrorized by a man in a red sweater? i thought dogs cannot see red. and do dogs really think so much? and fight ti dead to lead a sledge? not sure why this is a classic.
  • (4/5)
    I am not a “dog person” and did not expect to like this classic tale, but I’m really glad I read this when I did. My father was a great outdoorsman and he loved animals, but especially our dogs. I listened to the first half on audio, but then finished by reading the actual book. This last half is when Buck, a St Bernard / Shepherd mix has finally found a man he loves and who loves him. They respect one another, and the hierarchy of the camp, but Buck is increasingly called to the wild. The writing is vivid – you can feel the cold, or the pain of hunger, or the joy of a Spring day. And Buck is a noble narrator. I re-read it today, remembering my father and our many dogs through the years.
  • (3/5)
    It was fun to read this again, as I had only the vaguest recollection from reading it as a kid. Refreshingly unsentimental in its depiction of the natural world, it raises important questions about yearning for a life "beyond good and evil." A walk on the wild side...
  • (4/5)
    There's no way in hell my dogs think like this.
  • (3/5)
    The Call of the Wild centers around a dog named Buck and his survival in the human world. The book grapples with themes such as violences and nurture vs. nature. Students who enjoy reading about the struggle to survive harsh conditions will enjoy this book.