Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
The Twelfth Card: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel

The Twelfth Card: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel

Written by Jeffery Deaver

Narrated by Dennis Boutsikaris


The Twelfth Card: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel

Written by Jeffery Deaver

Narrated by Dennis Boutsikaris

ratings:
4/5 (21 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Released:
Jun 7, 2005
ISBN:
9780743551830
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Bestselling master of suspense Jeffrey Deaver is back with a brand-new Lincoln Rhyme thriller. To save the life of a young girl who's being stalked by a ruthless hit man. Lincoln and his protege, Amelia Sachs, are called upon to do the impossible: solve a truly "cold case" -- one that's 140 years old.
The Twelfth Card is a two-day cat-and-mouse chase through the streets of uptown Manhattan as quadriplegic detective Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs try to outguess Thompson Boyd a man whose past has turned him into a killing machine as unfeeling and cunning as a wolf. Boyd is after Geneva Settle, a high school girl from Harlem, and it's up to Lincoln and Amelia to figure out why.
The motive may have to do with a term paper that Geneva is writing about her ancestor, Charles Singleton, a former slave. Charles was active in the early civil rights movement, but was arrested for theft and disgraced. Lincoln and Amelia work frantically to figure out what actually happened on that hot July night in 1868 when Charles was arrested.
Deaver's inimitable plotting keeps this story racing at a lightening-fast clip. With breathtaking twists and multiple surprises, this is Deaver's most compelling Lincoln Rhyme audiobook to date.
Released:
Jun 7, 2005
ISBN:
9780743551830
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Jeffery Deaver (b. 1950) is an American author of thrillers. Born near Chicago, Illinois, he practiced law before writing his first novel, Manhattan Is My Beat, in 1988. This story of Rune, a video-store clerk who investigates a client’s murder, established Deaver’s talent for psychological suspense. He wrote two more novels starring Rune before moving on to Shallow Graves (1992), which introduced location scout and amateur sleuth John Pellam. The Bone Collector (1997) kicked off a long-running series starring paralyzed detective Lincoln Rhyme; this debut title was made into a film starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie in 1999. Deaver alternates his Rhyme novels with standalone books such as Garden of Beasts (2004) and Edge (2010), as well as a series about body-language analyst Kathryn Dance. In addition to his success as an author, Deaver is an accomplished folk musician, and recorded an album to accompany XO (2012), the third Kathryn Dance novel. He lives in New York City. 

Related to The Twelfth Card

Related Articles

Reviews

What people think about The Twelfth Card

4.0
21 ratings / 18 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    The Twelfth Card was my third Jeffery Deaver book in which Lincoln Rhyme and his team featured as the good guys. It was a fast paced story which moved along keeping me wanting to read the next chapter and in so doing incurring some late nights/early mornings.

    I thought the book could/would end about 40 pages earlier than it did, however the twists and turns included made every page thereafter worth reading. It may be that I read before going to sleep, but just when I thought that this would be the end, I was proven incorrect. I did not pick the end to this story until the last page!

    A definite 4 star read
  • (4/5)
    Jeffery Deaver cannot write a really bad book,but on occasionally one comes up this is not up to his usual high standard. 'The Twelfth Card' is one of them. In the first place he has a certain amount of 'gangsta' slang which needs a glossary to understand it. Then he introduces a killer who has a quite unique take on life (and death),but throws the whole thing away towards the end of the book. Not all is lost because when Lincoln Rhyme takes centre stage,the whole thing comes together.
  • (3/5)
    Not quite as fast-paced or engaging as some of the other books in this series, but not bad.
  • (4/5)
    This book took a while to read but not because it was dull...apart from time, you find yourself early on reading slowly to take in the scores of clues and information being fed to you as not doing so will catch you out later when something is figured out.The story starts with an attempted murder of a teen girl in a public library, and soon escalates to a murder of the librarian and an injured bystander. The apparent motive is attempted rape, but then strangely takes on a cultish lead and then changes tack to a crime from 140 years previously. As I allluded to, you need to be on your wits with this one as the plot changes almost with every chapter with clues in abundance - but which clues are genuine and which are 'planted'? Enter the brilliant Lincoln Rhyme, a forensic expert which an attitude - if you have seen The Bone Collector, he was played by Denzel Washington...and as good as that movie was, this book is better.I have never read a thriller that throws you off the scent so many times and I challenge anyone to solve it before it is revealed...There is not much I can find wrong with this book - not ruined by romances, Hollywood staging, nor complex plotting. You do need to get up to speed with street talk quite quickly though as this book is riddled with it (being based in Harlem). The portrayal of the hit-man is done perfectly to the point you cannot help but admire by his murderous trade.A must read.
  • (4/5)
    Didn't quite like the end of the case but well it's still great
  • (5/5)
    Couldn't put it down--loved it! Can't imagine how Jeffery Deaver's mind works! Wonderful!
  • (4/5)
    A good twisting plot and authentic characters. As an author myself the curse laid on me is that I usually work out the plot before it is revealed. Deaver managed to slip the bad guy past me in this book.
  • (3/5)
    a little slow to get started but a pretty cool story about a crime committed after the civil war is tied into a a modern day crime....Lincon Ryme is the the investigator in a wheel chair...Geneva Steel is the herione....tuns out the relative owns property in Manhattan and the there is a cover up by a big wall street guy whose ancestor stole the property to keep the property
  • (4/5)
    Deaver's quadraplegic forensic scientist returns to solve another seemingly unsolvable mystery. Although I didn't find the background to the crime particularly interesting - African-American history, Deaver's recurring characters and their development kept me interested until the end. I just hope for a more interesting mystery next time.
  • (4/5)
    A satisfying read, packed with Deaver's trade mark twists and turns. Geneva is fantastic creation - a teenager who is determined not to settle for second best - and I love the subtle character development of each of the recurring characters from book to book.
  • (5/5)
    Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs try to figure out why someone would attack 16-yr-old Geneva Settle; Geneva had been researching a relative when someone tried the attack; in the end she was attacked because of property inheritance
  • (2/5)
    This was a fun CSI type novel. A sixteen year old inner city girl from NYC gets caught up in a mystery that is generations old that her ancestor is included in.
    This book includes some history of New York City; linguistics; and forensics.
  • (4/5)
    Lincoln Rhyme is a famous criminalogist, known for solving the case. Even though he is confined to a wheelchair, he always gets his man. This case involves a 15 year old girl and a 150 year old mystery, but of course, he is equal to the task.
  • (5/5)
    I love the comfort of familiar characters (Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs) doing what they do best...solve mysteries. Lots of twists and turns in this thriller. Loved it.
  • (4/5)
    Let's start with the worst -- the narrator's clipped, serviceable treatment of this work passes, except for the many segments in which he is called upon to emulate dialogue by inner city youth. To hear Dennis Boutsikaris try to accurately use words like "phat" and "word" is like having a needle stuck in your head. However, Deaver's fine, compelling mystery makes this all worthwhile.
  • (4/5)
    This was a very convoluted and fluid plot that kept me guessing. Thompson Boyd was a cool customer. Meticulous and careful, he led them around for a while, but then through Rhyme?s equally meticulous and careful deduction, he was caught fairly early in the book. After a few chapters discovering who hired Boyd, I thought the rest of the story would focus around the older mystery. Wrong. It became unpredictable and pretty interesting. Not perfect, but a good outing for Rhyme & Co.
  • (4/5)
    Good entry in the Lincoln Rhyme/Amelia Sachs series. In this outing, a girl escapes from a potential killer and the gang must solve a 140 year old crime in order to solve the current mystery.
  • (4/5)
    I love Jeffery Deaver. Love the characters. Love the detecting. The plot was a little iffy, but who cares!