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The Dogs of War: The Courage, Love, and Loyalty of Military Working Dogs

The Dogs of War: The Courage, Love, and Loyalty of Military Working Dogs

Written by Lisa Rogak

Narrated by Kate Reading


The Dogs of War: The Courage, Love, and Loyalty of Military Working Dogs

Written by Lisa Rogak

Narrated by Kate Reading

ratings:
3.5/5 (19 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jun 25, 2012
ISBN:
9781452678160
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Military working dogs gained widespread attention after Cairo participated in the SEAL Team 6 mission that led to Osama bin Laden's death. Before that, few civilians realized that dogs served in combat, let alone that they could parachute from thirty thousand feet up.

The Dogs of War reveals the amazing range of jobs that our four-legged soldiers now perform, examines the dogs' training and equipment, and sets the record straight on those rumors of titanium teeth. You'll find heartwarming stories of the deep bond that dogs and their handlers share with each other, and learn how soldiers and civilians can help the cause by fostering puppies or adopting retirees.

An incredible story of the largely unseen but vital role that dogs play in our armed forces, The Dogs of War is a must-listen for animal lovers everywhere.
Publisher:
Released:
Jun 25, 2012
ISBN:
9781452678160
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Lisa Rogak is the New York Times bestselling author of more than forty books on a variety of subjects, from popular culture to dogs. She was the editor of Impatient Optimist: Bill Gates in His Own Words (Collins Business, 2012). She has also written a number of biographies, including those of Stephen King, Shel Silverstein, Dan Brown, Dr Robert Atkins, Stephen Colbert and others. She lives in New Hampshire. Her website is www.lisarogak.com

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Reviews

What people think about The Dogs of War

3.6
19 ratings / 18 Reviews
What did you think?
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    I'm not even a huge dog fan, but I really enjoyed this book. I learned a lot about the history of military dogs and their current roles overseas. It was very interesting to learn about the training and process that dogs and their handlers experience. The organization of the book resulted in what seemed like repetition of information or redundancy, but overall I found it to be a very interesting read and I think many of my students would also enjoy and be intrigued by the information in this publication.
  • (3/5)
    There is a lot of information about training, care, equipment etc. I thought there would be more stories and anecdotes. It was still a good read.
  • (5/5)
    ***THIS WAS A GOODREADS.COM FIRST READ CONTEST WIN!***

    This was such an amazing read. I so enjoyed reading this book. The author provided information about something that is not widely known to the general public. So many animal people would love this book. This book was very well written and very interesting. Thanks for a great read Ms. Lisa Rogak.

    ***THIS WAS A GOODREADS.COM FIRST READ CONTEST WIN!***
  • (4/5)
    Dogs of War was a great read. It had many different interesting short stories. To be honest I am surprised it only as a 3.6 average review. Im not sure what they were looking for. Definently a good read and people interested in dogs will find it very insightful. I learned so many little details.
  • (4/5)
    This book is worth a read. The author delves into the history of "dogs of war" and uses case studies to illustrate how dogs are used in the military. Not exactly for the faint of heart, in that the dogs are seen as "commodities", expensive ones at that when one considers cost of training. Many dogs have been killed by IEDs, where human soliders would have been in danger. War is ugly but dogs play an intregal and important part in many, many missions.
  • (3/5)
    The attack on Bin Laden's compound took place in March of 2011 and this book was published in October. That was a fast turn out to answer questions many people had about the dog that was part of the assault team. And answers we have. How the dogs are chosen and obtained, how they are trained, paired with a handler, cared for when in service, and what happens to them when their service has ended for one reason or another. The reasons dogs are used in the first place are to utilize their amazing abilities to smell and hear and the fear they strike in many of the enemies soldiers face these days.The investment in these dogs is impressive, both with time for training, creating items that help insure their health in hostile environments, and most recently, and the assurance that they are seen after in a respectful way (for at least two thirds of the survivors). One fact I found fascinating was that dogs are given a rank higher than their handler so if they are abused, the handler may be court-martialled.The author liberally inserts anecdotes from foster parents, handlers, trainers, vets, and those who adopt them later. The stories about these dogs are truly amazing.The only objection I have is to the lay out of the book. The chapters are interrupted by highlighted stories of individual dogs. I would have preferred to read these in between chapters since they broke the flow of the chapter. There are also two sections of color photos of the dogs and their handlers that are placed between sections.
  • (4/5)
    Females can serve in the military—provided they are spayed. Of course, Lisa Rogak is addressing the U.S. military eligibility of canines and not humans. This thought is one of many insights and descriptions the author has presented in this well-documented exposé on MWDs. And, don’t be looking for a Christopher Walken-type Hollywood warrior searching for weapons of mass destruction. This book reveals the history, selection, training, and maintenance of military working dogs (“MWDs”)—the nearly 3,000 canines drafted by the Pentagon. Interspersed are sidebar vignettes of certain canine lives, deaths, and contributions or sacrifices, as well as several pages of color photos of dogs and their handlers.Rogak’s text is supported by 17 pages of footnotes and eight pages of further resources. Some of her material seems to be repetitive and that is perhaps because she has used so many different sources that she wants to include as authority in her writing. Nevertheless, her style is breezy and her points are poignant in discussing the vital role that canines provide in human defense, either in military combat zones or in civilian security postings.One disturbing notion that Rogak addresses is that of a returning veteran suffering from PTSD that is summarily euthanized. Human soldiers aren’t treated that way and we don’t eat dogs as a delicacy as some cultures might. The counter-argument she presents is to explain about certain avenues of rehabilitation and adoption of the canine combat veteran. According to the author, adoptions have accelerated since the public discovered that a MWD—a Belgian Malinois called Cairo—was part of the Seal team that assaulted Osama bin Laden’s Pakistanian compound.This book is well worth reading in order to gain basic information on this compelling but neglected topic. There is one simple point that seems muted: If GIs are issued dog tags, what do MWDs get?
  • (4/5)
    "The Dogs of War" covers the basics of military working dogs in an easy-to-read format. IT includes color photographs and mini-biographies of dogs and their handlers. There were lots of quotes throughout the book - almost too many - and notes and places to go if you were interested in more information. The information covered was very basic, and included the gear, veterinary care, life, and history of MWDs. I was a bit disappointed in the sections on veterinary care and training: there was very little information and what was there was the most basic of summaries. Otherwise, it was an entertaining book that covered a subject not frequently found in regular 'dog books'.
  • (2/5)
    This book was interesting, in that it talked about dogs and how they have served in the wars. There are little snippets about the particular dogs and heroic stories about that particular dog. The book talked about the training of the animals and what being a handler of a dog entails. The bond between the handlers and their dogs is prevalent. However, at parts it felt like the book was just quickly thrown together. It was organized but repetitive and a little dry at parts.
  • (5/5)
    Wow! I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this book. I was nervous because though I absolutely love dogs, I am not a big fan of War. Yet I really did enjoy reading this book and learning more about military working dogs. The pictures they include are great and really add to personality of the book. Though I will warn you that the parts about dogs and Vietnam was terribly sad. I hated seeing how Vietnam not only was about ignoring the human being's well being but also that of the dogs they worked with. I'm so glad that many of these Vietnam Vets have worked so hard to make current military dog's lives so much better. I recommend this book wholeheartedly!
  • (4/5)
    This book really gave an insight to military working dogs. It was filled good information and a lot of stories.
  • (3/5)
    If you are a dog lover this is a great book for you. Dogs of Wars goes into the history and inner workings of military working dogs, sometimes known as MWDs. The book details the history of K9 units going back to WWI through today. There are interesting facts about how dogs have contributed to keeping their military units safe as well as what it takes to train a working dog.The book also interspeces profiles of notable dogs and handlers. These profiles clearly show the bonds, value, and loyalty dogs have in the military.This was a fast read. It is suitable for older elementary school students, middle school on upwards. The book may also interest boys who are reluctant readers; this may appeal to them if they enjoy animals, especially dogs.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed reading this book. It was a nice book to just pick up when I had the time, and I did pick it up. It had a lot of the information I had hoped for, and cute stories as well. It was what I expected from the description :]
  • (4/5)
    This is a fascinating account of the important role that military dogs play in our country's defense. Their impact is dramatic when the thousands of lives they save by bomb-sniffing are considered, and the author illustrates that impact in many ways. The anecdotes are engaging, and often read like short stories; the factoids about cost, medical care, and equipment are often surprising; and the emotional impact of the relationship between handlers and dogs is moving. Two sections of color photographs makle for enjoyable browsing. The tone of this book is conversational, informal yet smart, and will appeal to a range of ages and interests.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed the book. I liked how the author organized her subject. She appeared to use the army field manual as a framework or outline but interspersed real stories to take what would otherwise be very dry and made it very personal. It was drier than I would normally like but I was very interested in the topic and for that she has it well laid out. I enjoyed learning how dogs have been used in the military and how important they've been. Thanks for the book!
  • (3/5)
    More like reading one long newspaper article than a book.
  • (3/5)
    THE DOGS OF WAR proved only mildly interesting to me. Not quite a disappointment, but not particularly engaging either. Rogak did a more than adequate job of researching her subject - the use of dogs by the military in both peace and war - but the narrative had a rather herky-jerky feel, as she interspersed personal anecdotes and handler interviews with historical data and more official military definitions and training regimens for dogs and handlers. There have already been countless books written on the subject of dogs in war, and this one does not, in my estimation, add much of value. I had the feeling that writing this book was just a 'job' for Rogak. And sure enough, in the acknowledgements page, she thanks "Tom Dunne [the publisher] for coming up with the idea for THE DOGS OF WAR and entrusting the execution of the book to me." The book's prologue, which features the role of military working dog (MWD), Cairo, in the killing of Osama bin Laden, is perhaps the most interesting portion of the book. And then in the introduction, Rogak notes that "since the Cairo story hit, everyone wants to know more about these brave canines who venture into war zones with their human partners." So yes, I got the sense that the book was rather hastily slapped together in a rather opportunistic fashion, hoping to cash in on the flurry of interest in the mission that took out bin Laden. It has a very appealing cover and will undoubtedly sell well. But if you're looking for a good "dog book," then this will be a disappointment. While the writing is workmanlike and professional, THE DOGS OF WAR reads too much like a term paper, and it's simply not very interesting. Maybe a C+ to a B-.
  • (4/5)
    The Dogs of War: The Courage, Love, and Loyalty of Military Working Dogs Lisa RogakThanks to Netgalley and Macmillan for the opportunity to read and review this book prior to its release date.Great book about perhaps the lesser known and certainly less appreciated soldier, the military dog. Kogak provides us a myriad of personal insights into the lives of the dogs and their trainers. These incredible dogs have been serving alongside our service members for decades. Our soldiers rely upon them heavily to seek out dangers we as humans couldn’t possibly do and in the process have saved countless lives. Rogak does an excellent job providing the history of the military dog, the complex system of selecting the right ones for duty, the rigorous and constant training dogs and trainers must endure, and the close personal relationships that develop between of dog and trainer. Her book is quite timely with the recent public interest and story about Cairo, the military dog who was with Seal Team 6 when they raided Osama Bin Laden’s hideout in Pakistan. Rogak does well to include a segment about Cairo and the raid in her book.