Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
Wondrous Strange

Wondrous Strange

Written by Lesley Livingston

Narrated by Lesley Livingston


Wondrous Strange

Written by Lesley Livingston

Narrated by Lesley Livingston

ratings:
4/5 (60 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jun 16, 2009
ISBN:
9780061715082
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Since the dawn of time, the Faerie have taken. . . .

For seventeen-year-old actress Kelley Winslow, faeries are just something from childhood stories. Then she meets Sonny Flannery, whose steel-gray eyes mask an equally steely determination to protect her.

Sonny guards the Samhain Gate, which connects the mortal realm with the Faerie's enchanted, dangerous Otherworld. Usually kept shut by order of icy King Auberon, the Gate stands open but once a year.

This year, as the time approaches when the Samhain Gate will swing wide and nightmarish Fae will fight their way into an unsuspecting human world, something different is happening . . . something wondrous and strange. And Kelley's eyes are opening not just to the Faerie that surround her but to the heritage that awaits her.

Now Kelley must navigate deadly Faerie treachery-and her growing feelings for Sonny-in this dazzling page-turner filled with luminous romance.

Wondrous Strange is a richly layered tale of love between faerie and mortal, betrayal between kings and queens, and magic . . . between author and reader.

Publisher:
Released:
Jun 16, 2009
ISBN:
9780061715082
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Lesley Livingston is an award-winning author of teen fiction best known for her Wondrous Strange trilogy. Captivated at a young age by stories of the distant past and legendary heroes and warriors, Lesley developed into a full-fledged history buff and mythology geek. Her fascination with ancient Celtic and classical civilizations—spurred on by recently discovered archaeological evidence supporting the existence of female gladiators—inspired Fallon’s story in The Valiant. Lesley holds a master’s degree in English from the University of Toronto and was a principal performer in a Shakespearean theatre company, specializing in performances for teen audiences, for more than a decade. www.lesleylivingston.com. Twitter: @LesLivingston

Related to Wondrous Strange

Related Audiobooks
Related Articles

Reviews

What people think about Wondrous Strange

3.9
60 ratings / 42 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    I really ended up enjoying this book. I thought the first 3 chapters were a bit slow, but one I got past them the storyline was very entertaining.
  • (4/5)
    This is the first in a YA, fantasy, romance series based on Shakespearean plays. The main character is Kelly, an actor in a Central Park production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream," who soon finds out that the "dream," may be a tempestuous and deadly reality. A "meta" book with a story within a story within a story. An ingenious premise. Fun to read.
  • (4/5)
    Kelley goes to New York City. At 17, she already knows that she wants to be an actress, and is lucky enough to have a part in a production of Midsummer Night's Dream. But it is the week before Halloween, and there are strange happenings in Central Park, where she meets the mysterious Sonny Flanagan and rescues what she thinks is a horse out of the lake. Sonny turns out to be a changeling, of Oberon's court and a guard helping maintain the separation between fairie and the human realms. Kelley turns out to have some strong connections to fairie herself.
  • (5/5)
    Fun story to listen to. Nothing too heavy. Just fun.
  • (4/5)
    So as the color scheme and theme of the cover will tell you, as well as the title, this book is (I'm being nice here) kind of a rip-off of Wicked Lovely.I have no idea if the similarity is intentional, or if Livingston's even read Wicked Lovely, but I do know that it's awfully coincidental that these books are so alike (and that this one was released after WL). And ironically, Sonny, the main male in our story, makes quite the point of informing us that he does not believe in coincidences. Still, here's the summary:"Since the dawn of time, the Faerie have taken. . . . For seventeen-year-old actress Kelley Winslow, faeries are just something from childhood stories. Then she meets Sonny Flannery, whose steel-gray eyes mask an equally steely determination to protect her. Sonny guards the Samhain Gate, which connects the mortal realm with the Faerie's enchanted, dangerous Otherworld. Usually kept shut by order of icy King Auberon, the Gate stands open but once a year. This year, as the time approaches when the Samhain Gate will swing wide and nightmarish Fae will fight their way into an unsuspecting human world, something different is happening . . . something wondrous and strange. And Kelley's eyes are opening not just to the Faerie that surround her but to the heritage that awaits her. Now Kelley must navigate deadly Faerie treachery—and her growing feelings for Sonny—in this dazzling page-turner filled with luminous romance."Also, the boring trailer (which mostly focuses on Central Park--the point of most of WS's action):For starters, I absolutely hated their names. I understand trying to emphasize their "normalness" but it was a stretch too far. And Sonny's name didn't seem to be historically accurate for the era of his birth, but perhaps I am mistaken there.The humor in this book was quite cute, though. For instance, a potentially-deadly kelpie is named Lucky for (among other reasons) his love of Lucky Charms (the cereal). Many of the actions of the characters were also fun, such as some of the quirks of the fae. These little glimpses of characters were to be treasured, though, as there wasn't much character development, which kept the plot sort of up in the air, allowing it to jump slightly.Kelley, for example, was a bit of a Mary-Sue, though, thankfully, not quite as detestable as most.Like WL, WS had a good plot ("normal" girls discovers she actually has unlimited fairy powers due to some previously unknown mystical background), but here, as I said, it wasn't cemented well enough.I reached the end, pleased, but also sort of scratching my head. ...Is there a...sequel...question mark??Even after reviewing Livingston's web page, I'm still not sure. Can anyone clear this up for me?So, good points:-Depsite their names and lack of formation, the characters are fun, funny, and mildly worthy of cheering/booing-The cover is gorgeous (and, of course, what convinced me to buy the book. Yes, BUY--not borrow! I know!)-The theatre portions are delicious and deserve points for paralleling the story!Bad points:-Characters, underdeveloped, suddenly switch sides for no apparent reason (as we're not really sure of their motivation until it's carefully explained. Boring).-It's, let's admit it, kind of a rip-off of WL-It's not finished. Maybe??All in all, I recommend it as an easy read when you're looking for something fantasy, to WL fans, and as a bookshelf decorator.Enjoy!
  • (3/5)
    Pretty enjoyable but I did not like it as much as some other fairy books like Wicked Lovely or Lament.
  • (4/5)
    Lesley Livingston certainly knows how to weave an awesome faerie tale. Ms. Livingston uses a lot of classic faerie elements as well as a TON and a half of classic Shakespeare....some of it being the same thing. These are both very good things. Shakespeare in itself is hard for a young reader to understand and feel. I think in this book Ms. Livingston gives Shakespeare a platform for young readers to understand and comprehend. When your favorite character is standing, acting out a Shakespeare scene, and the author is describing the emotions, the other characters, it clicks in the head and all of a sudden you have a teen who has had their possibly first dose of Shakespeare at his greatest, instead of it being crammed down the throat in high school English.

    The characters are strong and willful but I don't think the author gave the reader enough time to truly get to know some of them. I liked Sonny, but by the time the story ended, I didn't know much about him and I wasn't head over heels in love with him, which is something I quite like in my male protagonists.

    The plot is quick paced, but I think the the author could have done so much more with it, this book could have been huge; at the same time, if the author made it even larger it might be more difficult for young minds to wrap around. There were also a couple points in the plot that were a bit predictable...the whole deal that Sonny makes, totally saw that coming from a mile away. Faeries are tricky like that.

    Overall this book is pretty good, I am really excited to read the next book in this series, Darklight
  • (3/5)
    Wondrous Strange is a debut YA novel in a series by Lesley Livingston. It is a cute and fun story about Kelley, an understudy in an off Broadway production of A Midsummer Night's Dream whose life suddenly begins mirroring her character.

    I was not as engaged with the story as I hoped. I think for me it was too young, I would have enjoyed more drama, conflict and romance and less humor. Reading reviews for the sequel, it seems that some of these concerns may have been addressed. So I may check that out to see what happens next in the story.

    If you enjoy young YA fantasy stories about faeries you should give this book a try.

  • (4/5)
    Kelley goes to New York City. At 17, she already knows that she wants to be an actress, and is lucky enough to have a part in a production of Midsummer Night's Dream. But it is the week before Halloween, and there are strange happenings in Central Park, where she meets the mysterious Sonny Flanagan and rescues what she thinks is a horse out of the lake. Sonny turns out to be a changeling, of Oberon's court and a guard helping maintain the separation between fairie and the human realms. Kelley turns out to have some strong connections to fairie herself.
  • (3/5)
    VOYA Ratings: 2Q, 3P"Thy words are blunt and so art thou." - Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part IIOf all the things to cross Kelley Winslow's path as she walked through central park, the last thing she expected to encounter was a horse struggling to reach the shore as it floundered in the lake. Diving in, Kelley struggles to aid the animal and recues it only to have it follow her home and magically appear in her bathtub. If that's not strange enough, Kelley's bathtub just happens to be on the third floor!When Kelley is unexpectedly given the role of Titania in her theater company's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream life begins to imitate art when she discovers the hidden secrets that lay beneath the surface of the mortal world. Faeries and mythical creatures are more than just characters in a play but rather they are real and altogether more terrifying than she could imagine. Ancient secrets and truths long hidden begin to be revealed as Kelley discovers a long lost connection to this other realm and the past she thought she knew.I wanted to like this book and it certainly had potential but it just felt too derivative of other, more famous works of fantasy fiction. Using the gimmicks of faeries and the classic Shakespearean play as a foundation sounds good but the driving force behind the narrative - the bland driving force - falls into the teen romance genre in the relationship of Kelley and Sonny. There was nothing new or particularly engaging here and I would recommend several other works in this genre before I would mention this one.
  • (5/5)
    Beltane, the Celtic holiday, was Saturday and I decided to participate in a Faerie filled way. So I cracked open my brand new copy of Wondrous Strange and sat outside in the sunshine wearing my tinkerbell necklace (Hey I got it when I was born, just like Kelley's Shamrock...maybe I am a Faerie Princess!).Lesley Livingston has created a vibrant and heady series here (if the first book is any indication), its full of real world charm and otherworld wildness. Kelley is 17, newly arrived in New York City and ready to become an actress. She has scored an understudy part in a small theatre groups production of Midsummer’s Night Dream and is minding her own business when she becomes wholly swept up in the beautiful but dangerous politics of the Faerie world. Throw in a handsome Irish changeling and this will be one Halloween she's not likely to soon forget (whoa, you had me at Irish Lesley).Talk about home grown talent, this is Lesley Livingston's first foray into writing and she's written a first part to a series potentially every bit as enjoyable and colourful as the The Mortal Instruments trilogy and definitely surpassing Twilight in plot (so far). An excellent addition to the paranormal genre of YA, I especially enjoyed the fact she went with the little used Faerie, a subgroup of the genre previously only largely filled by the much darker Holly Black (very exciting news was I picked up the The Poison Eaters while in New York as well, yay Faerie), but I was disappointed to see Amazon.com's match up her books with Need (this is a substantially stronger story when you compare first book to first book, keep in mind I haven't read Captivate yet or Darklight). I hope her Canadian status doesn't keep her out of the spotlight; this book deserves all the hoopla that her American counterparts seem to kick up.
  • (4/5)
    Since the dawn of time, the Faerie have taken. . . .

    Seventeen-year-old Kelley Winslow is living and working in New York. She’s just been moved up from the under-study of Titania in an off Broadway production of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. She has a loving aunt and a decent roommate. She has her feet firmly planted on the earth…things are going good. Until one day while rehearsing in Central Park she meets steel-gray eyed Sonny Flannery, and nothing will ever be the same.

    Sonny is a changeling, a mortal stolen by the fae and raised among them, and now one of the guards of the Samhain Gate. The Samhain Gate is a gateway between the Faery world, an enchanted and dangerous place, and the mortal realm. This gate only opens on Samhain – October 31 and anything can pass through.

    This year, as the time for the opening of the gate approaches, something is different. Something wondrous and strange. For Kelley’s eyes are not only opening to the Faery folk around her, but to her own birthright as well.

    Needless to say, I really enjoyed this book. It was slow to start, but once it got going, I found it to be an interesting and different take on the traditional Faery story. I really liked the use of the Shakespearean play in context with the story going on around it. Many of the characters are the same and I thought it added a nice little familiarity to the story. It will remind you of Melissa Marr, Holly Black, and other such author’s works, but I think it’s different enough to be interesting. It had its weak parts, like most first novels, but in the end I think Livingston pulled it out. I’m definitely looking forward to the next one in the series.
  • (4/5)
    A young adult novel, good to pass the time away and not too cliché. Made for a light reading that would help me relax. Has some holes in the plot though, where you don't understand bits of what is happening exactly and the author assumes you know all about fairy folk.
    I am considering reading the next one, if I can find it.
  • (2/5)
    This was an ok read. I would only recommend this to people who have a huge blind love for Shakespeare and no particular attachment to logic in a story.

    I keep wishing author would move beyond the stale old "Midsummer Nights Dream is based on real faeries..." shtick and come up with something more original. When I read the flap copy I didn't get the sense that this would be quite so intertwined with the Puck mythology, etc. Also, who lets their 17 yo move to New York City alone to attempt to be an actress? Especially (spoiler here) if that kid was a kidnapped faery princess? And why didn't she ever need to work? Sure, the main character was nominally employed by a theatre, but since when is that enough to survive in NYC with rent and food? The more I consider it, the more annoyed I get with the whole thing. And holy hannah, the coincidences just kept on piling up. Talk about contrived.

    I get that the author wanted to create a new series and riff off old legends, but I didn't really get a sense of why any of the characters were doing anything they were doing. Especially the huge glaring error with the (again, spoiler) beads in the horse's mane. A 1500 yo faery conveniently misses a glamour after spending days and days dealing with said horse? Whether it was on purpose or a mistake is never brought up, let alone resolved.

    About 50 pages from the end I realized I didn't need to read the rest because I knew exactly what was going to happen. I finished it (because I can't leave the end of a book unread) and I was right. Very predictable ending, and a weak set up for sequels.
  • (2/5)
    Honestly, I'm getting a little tired of this type of fairy book by now. The various Faerie courts, the main character who finds out there is something special about her, the faerie Love Interest.

    The writing style and "feel" of the book seemed exactly like Melissa Marr's. And Holly Black did it before either of them, though I'm reluctant to group her in the same category, because in my opinion she pulled it off better than both of them put together.
  • (5/5)
    Wondrous Strange is the story of Kelley, an actress at a very off-Broadway Shakespearean theatre who is currently playing Titania in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Little does Kelley know that Faeries do exist, and one in particular means her a lot of harm. Enter Sonny, a Janus guard who is responsible for keeping the Fae out of the mortal world. He's instantly drawn to Kelley, and is the first to realize that she isn't at all what she'd always thought she was. Throw in a bit of intrigue from the various Faerie courts (two in particular, but I don't want to spoil!) and combine with a very frightening and dangerous legend, and Kelley's life is about to be completely turned upside down.Intricate plot twists, spectacularly engaging characters, and a wonderful combination of Shakespeare made this an absolutely fantastic book that I pretty much devoured. It hit all of my weaknesses: a feisty, independent heroine, a swoon-worthy male hero, a bright-burning, page-melting romance, and a unique twist on the Faerie plot device. Not only were Kelley and Sonny fully developed and well-written, but the supporting characters were as well. It was such a relief to read a book where there were no flat characters, and for the most part, everyone managed to avoid the cliches that tend to overwhelm YA literature. I can honestly find no fault whatsoever with this book, and am eagerly looking forward to reading the last two. Now to just find the time....
  • (5/5)
    Normally I shy away from books about faeries. They’re the least favorite of the paranormal beings that I like to read about. I’m not sure why but I’m just not interested in them. Yet when I finished Wondrous Strange, suddenly my interest in faeries has skyrocketed all because of this single book. What can I say, except that I absolutely LOVED this book. Everything about it was so fantastic! I loved the characters, the whole story, and the references to A Midsummer Night’s Dream. It might help if the reader is familiar with the play in the first place, but a simple read through in wikipedia might help to those not wanting to read any Shakespeare. I’d have to say Kelley is a wonderful character to read. She might seem meek and mild in the beginning but when Sonny comes around to annoy her Kelley gets all riled up and shows her angry side. It was absolutely fun to read, she does have a certain spark and some chemistry between herself and Sonny. I like them both as characters. I also liked Auberon. Yes, he wasn’t the most nicest person and was a backstabbing bastage, but there was an aura of suave and calm collected coolness that just emanated from him whenever he came around. You just couldn’t help but feel some sort of attraction to him despite his aloof behavior. One can also not forget Lucky, even though it was a horse, it was still a wonderful silent sidekick. Bob was also unforgettable, who even though he was mischievous, he was an excellent supporting character too. The story is also a great read, I liked the idea of Sonny and his gang being tasked with protecting the gate so the Otherworld faeries don’t come in to create mischief or run amok. When things do run amok, the descriptions of what was happening, of bad trickster faeries creating chaos all over the city was just an eye opening read. I just had to keep going I could not stop reading unless I absolutely had to. There were plenty of twists and turns throughout the novel and it provides for much of the excitement. Overall it provided some real interesting and fun reading.I am definitely grabbing the second book of this series! I can’t want to see what happens! there’s so much Kelley has to look forward to (and has a lot to learn!) I’m so glad I picked this book up. I give it full credit for getting me back into the world of faeries and fully enjoying it. I definitely recommend this to other YA readers and those that love anything to do with faeries and A Midsummer Night’s Dream!
  • (4/5)
    All I can say is wow. I tore through this story in only a couple of hours. Love how the author weaves a Central Park love story into fairy mythology and also Shakespeare. *Spoiler* I will say, I should have realized that Kelley's roommate had fairy ties or else she wouldn't have been able to even see Lucky. I like the way she turned this story. It began with Sonny trying to rescue Kelley and ends with Sonny needing rescue by her. To be continued...
  • (3/5)
    'Wondrous Strange' was an imaginative twist on Shakespeare's works. Livingston reinvented the idea behind the story of A Midsummer Night's Dream to a modern-day New York City under the influence of the Lost Faeries. I was intrigued by the Lost Fey and how they ended up in the mortal world either by choice or force by Auberon. There were many twists and turns in this novel that kept me guessing until the very end. As an actor myself, I appreciated the occupation that Kelley chose for herself. She was a very strong character and a joy to follow on her journey. She was never deterred from her dream in being an actress and experiencing NYC on her own. The only downfall I felt that Kelley had was the fact that she fell into believing her true identity too easily. I think that she could have fought back a bit in terms of accepting her fate since she was such a determined girl. I adored the character of Sonny Flannery. He was special in the fact that he knew that he was mortal but was determined to fit in where he was, since he did not have a choice. He seemed like he was always searching for more but content to do his work. He ended up finding more when he first encountered Kelley.The joys of young, first love were explored in this story and I thought it was captivating from their first meeting. Even though Sonny knew what Kelley would become he still fought with every last fiber in his body to keep her safe and with him for as long as he could. The nickname 'Firecracker' was the most delightful affection Sonny gave Kelley and it was incredibly sweet.I appreciated learning more about the Faerie Courts and their ongoing battles with each other. The heart-breaking story of Queen Mabh and Herne gave a deeper look into the Autumn shadow court. It was interesting to delve deeper into the complex world of Faerie and their many races and lineages.'Wondrous Strange' was a fun and romantic read. This was not my favorite Fey book but I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys this genre.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderous Strange tells bout how Kelley meets and falls in love with Sonny. Kelley is 17 and an actress in New York City, she has been raised by her aunt Em after her parents were killed in a car accident. She is playing the fearie queen in Shakespere's Midsummer"s Night Dream while practicing in Central Park she runs in to Sonny. Alot of strange things start to happen to her then , she saves a horse from drowning and it shows up at her house climbs thru the window and gets in the bath tub. She runs in to Sonny a few more times thing get weirder and weirder so I don't soil anything .. i will stop here .. it is very beautiful written and takes you to where the book goes .
  • (4/5)
    This book was recommended through the Amazon recommendations, since I liked other similar books. I found the cover intriguing so I decided to get it from the library. This was a wonderful read, the pages kept me glued and the whole thing was a roller coaster of Kelley and Sonny's emotions. I loved that it was written so that both of their stories could be told.Kelley an actress living in New York City is about to pursue her dream as the lead actress sprains her ankle and she as understudy has to step into the lead role...when her whole world spirals out of control. 1st off she cant remember her lines followed by meeting a cute, mysterious, disappearing guy in the park. To make matters worse a horse ends up in her bathtub and she finds out that she doesn't belong in the mortal realm and that her parents are a crazy Fae king and queen.
  • (5/5)
    Loved it, but of course! This is the 3rd time reading it and I have enjoyed it every time! This is a book that I love to pass on to everyone I can. The fae, unseelie, seelie courts, mortal and immortal love, Midnight Summer's Dream, kelpies and The Wild Hunt! Got to love it all!
  • (4/5)
    I liked the story line of this book. I liked the characters. There were some things that were the same in all the fairy books, girl finds out she is a fairy and has to save the world. I did really like the book, and look forward to reading the second one.
  • (5/5)
    Author: Lesley LivingstonPages: 352Source: Purchased from Barnes and NobleSeries or Standalone?: 1st in series17 year-old Kelley Winslow doesn’t believe in Faeries. Not unless they’re the kind that you find in a theatre, spouting Shakespeare—the kind that Kelley so desperately wishes she could be: onstage, under lights, with a pair of sparkly wings strapped to her shoulders. But as the understudy in a two-bit, hopelessly off-off-Broadway production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, wishing is probably the closest she’s going to get to becoming a Faerie Queen. At least, that’s what she thinks... In this fun, urban fantasy, Kelley's off-stage life suddenly becomes as complicated as one of Shakespeare’s plot twists when a nighttime trip to Central Park holds more than meets the mortal eye.* * *Yet another dual perspective novel, Wondrous Strange is told from the points of views of Kelley, a struggling actress, and Sonny, a changeling human who was kidnapped by fey when he was a child and now guards the Samhain Gate in Central Park. The story is told in third-person, but the alternation between voices was done amazingly.Have I ever mentioned that I’m a major theatre geek? (*Ahem*) Well, I am. So of course each time any of the characters so much as stepped into a theater, I did an internal squeeeeee! But that aside, the concept of this novel was so well thought out, as well as the characters. I love a novel that will have me gasping when a startling revelation happens, or wanting to throw it against the wall when unfortunate events befall our heroes. And this book did just that. The writing is so vivid that, as a reader, you really feel what’s going on. I especially loved the more tender moments between Kelley and Sonny.Bravo to the art department, because that cover is mesmerizing. The entire book as a whole is stunning.Other books in this series:Darklight (2nd)Tempestuous (3rd) {UNRELEASED}Plot: 5/5Cover: 6/5!Writing: 4/5Uniqueness: 4/5Characters: 4/5
  • (4/5)
    Plot: Kelley has moved to New York and is living her dream of becoming an actress. She’s only an understudy but when the lead breaks her ankle, she is suddenly starring as Titania in a Midsummer Night’s Dream. Soon after getting the role however fairies become far more than Shakespeare’s fancy: she encounters a strange young man in central park, there is a horse in her bathtub and the people around her turn out to be much more than meets the eye. She is much more than she ever knew. And as Samhain approaches and the gates between this world and Fairy grow week, she may be the only one who can save New York.I would have thought that I would be tired of fairy romances by now (just this year I’ve read Radiant Shadows, Tithe, Little (Grrl) Lost and that’s not counting last year’s reading or the ones still sitting on my shelf) but this was another enjoyable adventure. It’s a book full of surprising twists and exciting action. Kelley is a girl who can take care of herself (though she does not always have the confidence to realize it) and I always appreciate that. The romance is promising though I’m not fully committed to it yet. This may not be my favorite fairy story (it has some very stiff competition, to be fair) but I’m glad I read it.
  • (3/5)
    While I did enjoy the story, there were parts of it that I felt were rushed, and/or needed a bit more development. I liked that Kelley was not immediately accepting of her new big life change, but I felt like after she accepted her fate, things began to move at a pace that was just too fast. Some of the dialogue between characters (Kelley and her Aunt) is simply unbelievable and obviously contrived, and the relationship between Kelley and Sonny seemed a trifle forced. The perspective shifts some between Kelley and Sonny, but is done well enough that it isn’t obnoxious at all. The ending was decent, though the major action literally took up around a page and I feel leaves the reader going “What? That’s it?”. That said, though, the story was entirely easy to read and easy to like. I’ll be reading the sequel, Darklight, for sure.
  • (2/5)
    A 17 year old girl moves to New York, understudies the lead as Tatiana in a production of A Midsummer Night's Dream, gets a shot at the lead, meets a Changeling, and discovers that she is a fairy. While the plot is seductive, the story disappoints with lack of character development, unrealistic believability, and a storyline that gets old quickly. The prologue is confusing and so scattered that many might put the book down despite the enticing cover. Even when the reader reaches the action climax, the too old for a 17-year-old sarcasm of Kelley and her annoying habit of speaking like a movie character becomes tedious. The plot of a horse that lives in a bathtub for several days is also incredibly unrealistic, even for a fairy tale. The romance between Sonny and Kelley is not credible either. Sonny comes across as a wimpy male who is inexplicably attracted to a mean-spirited, rude girl. The only redeeming quality is Puck. This character isn’t revealed in the beginning, but his dialogue is witty. Teen girls will read it and parents will be happy that nothing is offensive. I don’t recommend this book because it did not make me feel satisfied at the end.
  • (4/5)
    Wondrous Strange was a magical mix of fun and adventure. With every faerie story I’ve read, it’s either been strictly intense or dolled up, but I love that Lesley Livingston found a happy medium.Kelley is probably one of my favorite literary characters of all time. She’s snarky, sarcastic and strong, and she doesn’t let the sudden intrusion of powerful faeries into her life get her down. Her stubborn but highly entertaining attitude stayed in check throughout the entire novel, and I loved every minute of it. Her interaction and budding romance with Sonny, a human who guards the faerie Samhain Gate, was hilarious and refreshing - a definite role reversal to the usual “guy is laid back, girl is serious and determined” cliché.I love that I felt so educated afterwards! Prior to reading this book, besides seeing an episode of Suite Life Of Zack And Cody, I knew absolutely nothing about A Midsummer’s Night Dream. I learned enough about the play to actually interest me in finding out more about it. And despite my lack of knowledge on the play, it was adapted wonderfully into the rest of the story, making Kelley’s self-discoveries and adventures a bit more relatable and a lot more ironic.Overall, I really enjoyed Wondrous Strange. I’m a not huge fan of faerie books, but when they’re informative yet enthralling such as this one, I can’t help but be drawn in! Mixing magic, romance, some intense action scenes and a lovable kelpie that lives in Kelley’s bathtub, it’s a fun thrill-ride. I definitely recommend!
  • (4/5)
    Upon the recommendation of a book seller, I picked this one up. I am glad that I did. This is a fun tale that twists Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream into a modern romance. The characters are fun, the faeries are wicked and the combination is a good read. I subsequently discovered that this is a Whit Pine selection. I look forward to the next one.
  • (5/5)
    Good Stuff• Delightfully imaginative• Stories about the Fae often irritate and confuse me, but not in this case.• Tons of magic, suspense and romance• Interesting characters• Intelligent and witty dialogue that is very realistic (well as much as you can in a story about faeries)• Beautiful cover• Fast paced storyline• Great secondary characters (Hopefully they will be developed more in the rest of the series)• wonderful descriptions of the theatre world• Heroine is wonderfully human. She makes mistakes, learns from them and she is just plain interesting• Loved the horse in the bath scenes• Some of the early scenes between Kelly and Sonny are wickedly funny• Sorry Twilight lovers (I like the books too -- not those horrendous movies) but this is much more age appropriate for the YA category. Also Kelley is far more interesting and less wussy than Bella -- sorry it had to be said, cannot tell you how many times I wanted to smack Bella upside the head• Author is Canadian : ) and she doesn't write depressing stuff set in the bushNot so Good Stuff• Some of the Fae lore information irritated me a little (just a personal observation, nothing against the author)• Had a sudden urge to read Shakespeare• The main characters name is SonnyWhat I Learned• The Fae really are not nice creatures for the most part• That it would be kind of cool to have a horse that lived in your bathtub -- but only if you had more than 1 bathroom of courseFavorite Quotes/PassagesOver my dead, shapely body, the Faerie sneered.Well. I think it is safe to say that, in my absence, the power grabbing and backstabbing and political intrigue has officially reached an all-time Otherworld high.I HATE the courts! She spat. Why can't they just leave off with all the stupid homicidal meddling.Ask that Sir Lancelot creep, Tyffanywy snapped. Wait -- no, don't. It was complicated.Who Should Read• Fans of stories about the Fae• Those who are usually irritated about stories about the Fae• Young adults -- even as young as 10 will enjoy it• Lovers of the theatre world