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The Way We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter

The Way We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter

Written by Peter Singer and James Mason

Narrated by Rick Adamson


The Way We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter

Written by Peter Singer and James Mason

Narrated by Rick Adamson

ratings:
3.5/5 (3 ratings)
Length:
12 hours
Released:
Apr 24, 2006
ISBN:
9781598872057
Format:
Audiobook

Description

A thought-provoking look at how what we eat profoundly effects all living things and the environment—and how we can make healthful, more humane food choices.

More people than ever before are paying attention to the food they buy and eat: where it comes from, how it's produced, and whether or not it was raised humanely. Singer and Mason examine the diets of three typical families to explore the impact our food choices have on the future of life on earth. They also identify six empowering ethical principles that conscientious consumers should consider when shopping for groceries or eating out. Speaking to the mainstream, their advice reflects this principle: "You can be ethical without being fanatical."

Released:
Apr 24, 2006
ISBN:
9781598872057
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Peter Singer is the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics at Princeton University and laureate professor at the University of Melbourne’s School of Historical and Philosophical Studies. The most prominent ethicist of our time, he is the author of more than twenty books, including Animal Liberation, Practical Ethics, and The Life You Can Save. Singer divides his time between New York City and Melbourne, Australia.

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What people think about The Way We Eat

3.7
3 ratings / 3 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    I liked that the authors follow three families and their eating habits and search for the source of the food that the families consume. It's interesting how people jusitfy what they eat and how other justify why they choose to raise animals the way they do. Overall, this book helped me to be more aware of where my food comes from.
  • (4/5)
    This book clearly shows that what we choose to eat isn't just about nourishing our bodies, it's also about how we live in and impact on the earth and other creatures. I'd class myself as a conscientious omnivore and after reading this book I'm becoming more conscious about the food I buy and consume. The book is a good introduction to applied ethics, and Singer and Mason make few judgements about the people they feature in the book. They understand that people live by a range of values and constraints including time, money and community. The book canvasses issues that include animal rights and welfare, environmental impacts of industrial food production, and economics. The ethical discussions are clear and logical, and leave the reader to make their own choices. I recommend the book to anyone who wonders why they should bother paying extra for barn laid or free range eggs or any organic produce, and to anyone interested in the quality and quantity of food they eat.(Read April 2008)
  • (4/5)
    This book was working on getting me to think about changing my diet and shopping habits until it started to be a "Vegan is the only one true way" book. I suspect that it would be where it would loose a lot of other meat-eaters too. It's an interesting book about the ethics of what you eat and the merits and demerits of each label. Some of the labels have been so diluted and abused that they have lost meaning. It did make my skin crawl when I read about the conditions that our meat is kept in before it dies. I'm a country girl and I understood the relationship between the meat on my plate and the cute animals outside. The bit that truly lost me was "Fearnley-Whittingstall's River Cottage Meat Book includes hints on cooking pheasant, partridge, pigeon, mallard and teal ducks, geese, grouse, woodcock, snipe, rabbit, hare and venison, with a reference to cooking 'the odd squirrel' as well. It seems safe to say that many readers, including many who eat meat will be repulsed by this list." Nope. I've actually eaten a fair few on the list, and feel no shame about it either, a few of those that I haven't I have curiousity about too.Yes a good read but ignore chapter 17 if you don't want to feel annoyed at preachiness. The rest is interesting aspirations but I'm not sure that I'm willing to go as far as others.