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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

Written by Arthur Conan Doyle

Narrated by Edward Raleigh


The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

Written by Arthur Conan Doyle

Narrated by Edward Raleigh

ratings:
4/5 (102 ratings)
Length:
10 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781601362780
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: A Scandal in Bohemia, The Red-Headed League, A Case of Identity, The Boscombe Valley Mystery, The Five Orange Pips, The Man with the Twisted Lip, The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle, The Adventure of the Speckled Band, The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb, The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor, The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet, The Adventure of the Copper Beeches.
Publisher:
Released:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781601362780
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1859. Before starting his writing career, Doyle attended medical school, where he met the professor who would later inspire his most famous creation, Sherlock Holmes. A Study in Scarlet was Doyle's first novel; he would go on to write more than sixty stories featuring Sherlock Holmes. He died in England in 1930.

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Reviews

What people think about The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

4.2
102 ratings / 117 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    I've read this multiple times, having first come to Holmes as a teenager. This was the first time I've listened to them, and having Stephen Fry narrate is a stroke of genius. He has that patrician voice that seems to match nicely with the tone I can hear in Watson as he narrates the stories. The short stories make it easy to listen while commuting. That and the fact that as I listened to them I could remember what the puzzle or situation involved meant this was a bit like revisiting an old friend and finding them both changed and reliably the same.
  • (4/5)
    My first collection of Sherlock's shorts and they were super fun. Witty, varied, self-referential, Holmes is a much gentler fellow in these tales than he appears in recent incarnations. He fights for the underdog and cares about the wronged. Some of these stories seem to have been told and retold in every detective series ever imagined but they shine here in their original forms.
  • (4/5)
    This collection of a dozen short stories recorded by Dr. Watson showcases the deductive skills of Sherlock Holmes. The crimes range from murder to blackmail, robbery, and missing persons. They’re not in chronological order. Watson is married in some stories, and in others he is a bachelor sharing rooms with Holmes. The impression one gets is that Watson is writing up cases from his notes as something triggers his memory of a particular case. This time around I listened to the audio by Ralph Cosham. I prefer Edward Hardwicke’s narration of the Holmes stories, perhaps because he played Watson in the Granada TV series.
  • (4/5)
    The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet (Son is accused but daughter stole it, son got it back.)-The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle (Steals the jewel then loses it. Good.)-The Adventure of the Copper Beeches (Hired to impersonate, daughter because she's locked up.)-The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb (Not really a mystery. Just a tale. Bad guys got away too.)-The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor (Bride finds outher old husband is alive and disappears.)-The Boscombe Valley Mystery (Average, Holmes style mystery with killer who is not really a bad guy.)-The Five Orange Pips (Way to short. Cool that the KKK guys died but Holmes didn't get a chance to punish them.)-The Red-headed League (Too short but the red-headed league was very original.)
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this one, it had a number of interesting short stories in highlighting the skills of Sherlock Holmes. I much prefer longer novels to short stories but I did all these stories fully engaging. Onto the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes now.
  • (5/5)
    A strong collection of Holmes stories, highlighted by the powerfully creepy “The Speckled Band,” the modesty gothic “The Copper Beeches,” and the delightful “A Scandal in Bohemia.”The only story that was substandard for me was “The Blue Carbuncle,” in which the plot was too fantastic to be believed. But even that story is full of the late Victorian atmosphere and Holmes at his best.We tend to forget how much mystery stories and novels owe to Conan Doyle. His ideas and plots are being used even today as inspiration for authors.If you long for gas-lit London, hansom cabs, fog, and excellent detecting, try this volume, either for the first or fifth time. You’ll be glad you did.
  • (4/5)
    Holmes and Watson come alive in short stories. Someone (who, I wish I'd recall) once said that if you only read Agatha Christie's short stories, and Conan Doyle's novels, you'd think both were terrible writers. It certainly seems true in Conan Doyle's case (from the two I've read thus far).

    Either way, of the twelve stories in this collection, all of them are quite enjoyable. They showcase a slightly more even relationship between the two heroes, as well as featurnig a varied array of guest characters, and mysteries which Conan Doyle easily shifts from political intrigue, to international conspiracy, to simple mistaken identity. In fact, the only story that I don't think really works anymore is "The Five Orange Pips" - and this is only because it has dated to the point where the killer's identity was something new and curious in the 1800s, but is now quite commonly known by most Westerners, meaning that most readers will probably catch on from about page three.

    After this, I have renewed vigour to move on to the 4th of Holmes' 9-book canon. We'll see!
  • (4/5)
    Great little mystery stories, I had fun reading this!
  • (3/5)
    Prior to this, the only Sherlock Holmes I had attempted to read was "The Hound of the Baskervilles" which I started at least twice but never finished. I've enjoyed the PBS series "Sherlock" and a friend mentioned that some of the events in that corresponded with what she'd read in the stories/novels. So when this one came up as free on Amazon, I downloaded it and decided I'd give it a try. I enjoyed the stories, but I don't follow the clues that Holmes sees/hears as he investigates--so his reveal is always a bit of a surprise to me.
  • (3/5)
    This was a quick read of short stories featuring the classic Sherlock Holmes. The stories were simple and fun to read. I enjoyed the personality and thought-process of Holmes more than the mysteries, but I think it was worth the read.
  • (3/5)
    Intussen al een eeuw klassieke detective verhalen. Wat opvalt is dat Holmes eigenlijk geen sympathieke held is, en zelf regelmatig in zijn hemd wordt gezet.
  • (3/5)
    Intussen al een eeuw klassieke detective verhalen. Wat opvalt is dat Holmes eigenlijk geen sympathieke held is, en zelf regelmatig in zijn hemd wordt gezet.
  • (3/5)
    Nett zu lesende Kurzgeschichten aber als Krimi ungeeignet. Was das Buch dann doch noch lesenswert macht ist das Lokalkolorit des auslaufenden 19ten Jahrhunderts.
  • (3/5)
    I just finished the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It was a free download from Amazon onto my Kindle.You know what I really liked it. Sherlock Holmes is really fun smart guy except he cannot let his super logical brain be diverted by any sort of female wanderings. It makes me wonder about him. He is also a cocaine addict and proud of it. It helps him sort things out. And he has been known to hang out in opium dens.The stories are very clever and well written. I mean how many people actually have actually read the book? I never had.Anyways, I give the books a three out of five stars. Three is worth reading. The stories get a little repetitive and I admit I only read about half of them. Sorry!
  • (5/5)
    Great mystery stories that I will miss reading on the couch each night.The clues offered give readers a chance to figure out the crime and criminalsand none is gruesome or horrifying, though The Thumb can be rough to endure.The characters of Holmes and Watson are so finely tuned that we fit right in as soonas the fireplace or dressing gown or breakfast are mentioned.A few of the stories could have used more suspense, as though Doyle was tired and just wanted to end them,yet what a variety!
  • (4/5)
    The stories are interesting even today, but the writing does not fully survive the test of time. The language used on conversations is old fashioned, but even for a not-native speaker it is not hindering the experience. The only part that I really dislike is how Sherlock Holmes is portrayed as a god of deduction while Watson is constantly downgrading himself as not worthy common man next to the superior Sherlock. I'm glad the movies have fixed this and have given Watson a more active role and Sherlock some flaws.
  • (4/5)
    A collection of short stories as told by Dr Watson of his cases with Sherlock Holmes. Watson (author Doyle) isn't afraid to demonstrate Holmes' personality tics and general moral faults, while admiring Holmes' ability to find a needle in a haystack through keen observation and precise deduction. Holmes is CSI before there was CSI and does it without the tools of today's TV shows. Holmes listens to his interviewees in great detail, is quick to observe the littles things (her left hand was more worn than her right with that crease in her dress she therefore was spending great deal of time sewing) and is able to connect all the dots and even add the missing dots. Entertaining and very easy to read, leave and pickup because each story is only an hour or so read.
  • (5/5)
    Holmes is ALWAYS worth a read.
  • (4/5)
    The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892) is the first book-length collection of Holmes short stories, they were originally published in The Strand Magazine 1891-92. Most of them have small references to other stories so there is a sense of coherence and world-building. It includes "The Adventure of the Speckled Band" which Doyle considered his all-time favorite Holmes story. It's gaslight entertainment that evokes an age. The spooky mansions with the evil mastermind, brutish henchmen and the locked room with a mystery. Well, it's better than Saturday morning cartoons.
  • (4/5)
    It was nice to re-read these.
  • (4/5)
    You pretty much know what you're getting with Sherlock Holmes, and these are some pretty fun brainteasers that all blend together after you read several in a row.
  • (3/5)
    I did try to think of something smart and witty to open this review but not having pipe tobacco or recreational drugs at hand failed miserably.Like the vast majority of the population I have watched many cinematic adaptations of Sherlock Holmes and his adventures but had never actually read any of the original stories. I thought that it was about time I rectified that.I started the book with a certain amount of trepidation because for one I am no real fan of short stories, and these are all roughly 25 pages long, and quite frankly the film adaptations tend to leave me somewhat disappointed in that I find Holmes's smug and superior attitude pretty annoying. Sadly the book had much the same effect. I rather enjoyed trying to guess whodunit and on a couple of occasions even had it correct but I was displeased by the pretty abrupt endings, just as the story seemed to be getting interesting Holmes would give the solution to the puzzle and they would all go home to tea. Bah.That said I did enjoy Conan Doyle writing style and admire his imagination so it is no surprise that this book or more accurately the lead character has stood the test of time, more than 100 years in fact. In particular I enjoyed the comic element of The Engineer's Thumb which showed admirably the quintessential stoicism of Victorian Englishmen. I did waver between 3 and 4 stars but finally plumped for the former. It just didn't really grip me.
  • (4/5)
    Truly a must read for men
  • (3/5)
    This was my first Sherlock Holmes book. It is a collection of short stories, and I am generally not a big fan of short stories. They were mostly o.k., but I had a hard time focusing on it. My mind tended to drift. And, as with most collections of short stories, some are better than others. Although, I thought they worked well as short stories, but given how much my mind wandered, I can only rate it o.k. I will likely try another Sherlock Holmes, but a novel instead next time.
  • (5/5)
    I think that perhaps, apart from a few Nancy Drews, it was the Sherlock Holmes stories that got me started on a lifetime of mystery reading. I've reread them several times and enjoyed them just as much or more each time.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent narration of a classic collection of mystery stories! The version I listened to was performed by Ben Kingsley. These mysteries really do stand the test of time. One thing I found interesting is that Holmes is not a very likeable character. I have also been reading Laurie King's Mary Russell series that features a Holmes who is brusque and incredibly intelligent in that superior obnoxious way, but shows a bit more humanity.
  • (4/5)
    Simple but effective. An engaging read, if not particularly noteworthy in terms of writing.
  • (4/5)
    *fond*

    I may be giving bonus points for nostalgia, but original flavor!Sherlock Holmes is still my favorite. <3
  • (4/5)
    It is very exciting for a classic read. A classic Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys but Sherlock Holmes is definitely a more colorful character, smarter and cooler. He reminds me of Dr. House, someone who loves a good puzzle and they also have the same urge of solving a very difficulty case. Modern day policemen needs to emulate Sherlock Holmes. I commend Sir Arthur Conan Doyle for being able to reach out to readers of different ages, different sizes and different nationality.
  • (5/5)
    Much better than the novels if you ask me. Great scope, every single case was interesting and written in a concise and clear manner, yet somehow with enough detail to give a lot of victorian flavour to the story. Loved the short but memorable appearance of Irene Adler and I was surprised to see a story about the KKK. Great collection of short stories with vivid characters and plots that, far from being far-fetched, allow Holmes' methods to shine.