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Henry Hikes to Fitchburg

Henry Hikes to Fitchburg

Written by D.B. Johnson

Narrated by James Naughton


Henry Hikes to Fitchburg

Written by D.B. Johnson

Narrated by James Naughton

ratings:
4/5 (8 ratings)
Length:
5 minutes
Released:
Jan 1, 2001
ISBN:
9780545748964
Format:
Audiobook

Description

It isn't how fast you get someplace, but what you do along the way: that's the philosophy behind this story about two friends who agree to meet 30 miles away in Fitchburg. In this story inspired by Thoreau's WALDEN, Henry elects to take a very long nature walk, while his friend chooses to work to earn his train fare.
Released:
Jan 1, 2001
ISBN:
9780545748964
Format:
Audiobook


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Reviews

What people think about Henry Hikes to Fitchburg

3.9
8 ratings / 8 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Henry, a bear based on Thoreau, makes a deal with his friend: see who makes it to Fitchburg first, Henry by walking or his friend by earning train fare. Johnson writes and illustrates a chapter of Thoreau's life with sweetness and humor. His book makes me want to go hiking. It would be interesting to read the book to kids and ask them which method they would choose.
  • (4/5)
    Lovely illustrations and really good story based on Henry David Thoreau's philosophy. Henry and a friend decide to see who can get to Fitchburg first, by walking or by earning the money for a train ticket. An interesting story of time vs. money. The story seems to tip the hat toward Henry and his walk through the woods, since he had some blackberries to share with his friend (who was empty handed) at the end of the trip. It would be an interesting class discussion to see who sided with Henry's friend, though, who got money for doing different tasks, saving up for a trip he wanted to take, one with a competitive challenge (who will get there first?) to it.
  • (4/5)
    I felt that this book was fun, but may not be as engaging for all students. It is a cute take on "stopping and smelling the roses" mixed with a built in math lesson. I think this is a really good way to remind kids that we can't rush through life all the time. To enjoy life we need to have fun and take time to enjoy the world around us. Teachers can use this best for the quick addition lesson and for a fun read with their students!
  • (3/5)
    The author has obviously never tried to walk 30 miles in one day. I'll take the train, thanks.
  • (4/5)
    This book could be used as an way of introducing student's to Thoreau's idea, "The cost of a thing is the amount of what I will call life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run." You might also use this book to get students to think about how the seed of an idea can be expanded into a larger work, such as a children's book.
  • (4/5)
    This picture book depicts two bears journeying to Fitchburg. One bear represents Henry David Thoreau who prefers to walk the thirty mile journey and enjoy nature along the way. The other bear decides to work in order to earn the train fare for the trip. This kid friendly book is a good introduction to the biography of Thoreau.
  • (4/5)
    This D.B. Johnson book depicting Henry David Thoreau's life through the life of Henry, the bear, so clearly shows the benefits of a simple lifestyle. While this is arguably not nonfiction, teachers can use this story as a way to help students, even in high school, understand what Thoreau and the Transcendentalists lives were like. Johnson presents two different routes to Fitchburg, allowing the reader to view images and side by side descriptions of the two different journeys. While there is not one "right" way, and Henry's friend arrives to Fitchburg first, the last line, "I stopped for blueberries" encompasses Henry's adventure. The common phrase "It's not where you're going, it's how you get there" may help students think about the way they live their lives and what they may sometimes miss by rushing. I would possibly use this as a mentor text in an English classroom to introduce the Transcendentalist movement and Henry David Thoreau.
  • (3/5)
    Henry Hikes to Fitchburg details the love of nature of Henry David Thoreau. In this story, Henry and his friend have two different strategies to get to Fitchburg--with Henry walking and his friend working hard for money to catch the train. As the story goes, Henry and his friends experiences are compared on different pages in the obstacles they have to traverse to get to where they want to go. The story was interesting although not captivating. As a mentor text, it could be used for a technique that compares two different experiences or one that starts with the same line for each page. Henry ____________, his friend ____________.