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The Lifted Veil

The Lifted Veil

Written by George Eliot

Narrated by Cathy Dobson


The Lifted Veil

Written by George Eliot

Narrated by Cathy Dobson

ratings:
4/5 (12 ratings)
Length:
1 hour
Released:
May 7, 2013
ISBN:
9781467668941
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

One of George Eliot's most intriguing works. During a period of illness, Latimer first discovers an unusual ability. He is able to read other peoples' minds and see visions of the future. Rather than being a gift, this strange phenomenon increasingly becomes a curse. But the one thing that keeps him going is his love for Bertha who Latimer knows will one day marry him, and who is the one person whose thoughts remain a mystery to him. But everything changes when Latimer finally does gain sporadic insight into Bertha's mind... and finds her thoughts are much more sinister than he had anticipated.
Released:
May 7, 2013
ISBN:
9781467668941
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Mary Ann Evans, George Eliot para la historia de la literatura, nació en 1819 en Chilvers Coton (Warwickshire), hija de un agente inmobiliario. A los ocho años se la consideraba ya «fuera de lo normal» por su peculiar inteligencia y brillantez; a los diecisiete confesaba su agnosticismo, y su padre, que le había dado una rigurosa educación religiosa, la echó de casa.

De hecho, sus primeras obras surgieron a raíz de esa truncada formación: tradujo la Vida de Jesús del teólogo alemán David Strauss y proyectó escribir una historia de la Iglesia desde Jesús hasta la Reforma. Tradujo La esencia del cristianismo de Feuerbach y la Ética de Spinoza y se hizo cargo de la subdirección de la revista Westminster Review, el foro intelectual progresista más importante de su tiempo.

El crítico George Henry Lewes, que la alentó a dedicarse a la literatura, llegaría a ser su compañero: decidieron vivir juntos a pesar de que él estaba casado.

Las primeras novelas de George Eliot, situadas en su Warwichshire natal, tienen cierto aire idílico: Scenes of Clerical Life (1858), Adam Bede (1859), El molino junto al Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), aunque algunos insólitos experimentos, como la novela corta El velo alzado (1859; ALBA CLÁSICA núm. XXVIII), anunciaron ya a una escritora de gran ambición y originalidad. Con la novela histórica Romola (1863) inició su etapa de madurez, caracterizada por un realismo de fuerte base intelectual: a ella pertenecen Felix Holt (1866), Middlemarch (1871-1872) y Daniel Deronda (1876). A la muerte de Lewes en 1878, se ocupó de concluir la obra más importante de éste, Problems of Life and Mind. En 1880 se casó con el agente de bolsa John Walter Cross, pero en diciembre de ese mismo año falleció en Londres.


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What people think about The Lifted Veil

3.9
12 ratings / 9 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Apparently this novel was not only unusual for George Elliot, but for the time. The author presents Latimer - a young man from a wealthy self-made family who is not raised to carry on the family business - that is left to his stronger and lustier older brother. Whilst in Switzerland studying in a healthy atmosphere where he is thriving, he has a clairvoyant moment that leads to a dead faint. As the blurb from the book states: Latimer, a sensitive and intellectual man, finds he has clairvoyant powers. Then he has a vision of a woman, 'pale, fatal-eyed', whom he later meets: she in Bertha Grant, his brother's fiancee. Entranced, bewildered, Latimer falls under her spell, unwilling to take heed of the warning visions which beset him. In this edition, there is an excellent essay on George Elliot and this novella's publication history. At the time of writing, the concept of being able to change your fate was little considered - fate was fate and the fact that you could see into your future or that of others was unfortunate but unchangeable. It is only is later years that the concept of changing your fate has been presented although not all novels and other media such as plays and movies allow us to get off so easily, as there is a common theme of running away from the known fate, only to reach it in another quite different manner. The Twilight Zone made much of this theme in its shows - so too Alfred Hitchcock's TV Theater plays.
  • (4/5)
    A novella about a troubled young man, the son and heir to a wealthy banker (or some such). A great exercise if you want to think about "the reliability of the narrator," because he's clearly mad as a hatter but doesn't know it; but it's mercifully short. George Eliot's writing is superb as usual, though the story is very odd and gets especially weird towards the end.
  • (3/5)
    A mini-book containing a short story about a man whose life is blighted by his ability to foresee the future and read other people's thoughts.
  • (3/5)
    [The Lifted Veil] is a rather anamolous novella by George Eliot as it deals with the supernatural and seems to be Eliot's foray into Gothic experimentation.Latimer, the protagonist, is a rather neurasthenic young man who becomes obsessed with Bertha Grant, his robust brother's fiancee. After his brother dies in an accident, he marries Bertha although he has a premonitory vision of their miserable life together.I found the narrator somewhat intriguing, but I don't think the other characters were at all well developed. Eliot built the suspense well, but I thought the payoff was pretty anti-climactic. Up until that point, I thought the book was very Poe-like, but Poe usually manages to "thrill" the reader in a more satisfying way. Her exploration was more philosophical than Gothic -- more interested in the horrors of a life lived outside of meaningful social contacts than creating terror or horror in her readers.
  • (5/5)
    Gorgeous short story. Really beautifully written, and an intense read.
  • (3/5)
    More of a short story than a novel (at only 60+ pages plus an afterwards by a modern writer), this was a fast, enjoyable read. Eliot's style and tone here reminded me of Frankenstein and a number of Poe's short stories.
  • (4/5)
    A deep dark psycho-depressive Victorian horror novella from Eliot, with a good ambiguous touch--we never know if Latimer really has the clairvoyant sight he claims, and therefore if the veil that lifts is the one between man and true sight, or madness. It's psychologically skilled on a more mundane level as well, with the treatment of a loveless cold war of a relationship between a narcissist and a histrionic--the fear of others and yet the fear of isolation. It's minor Eliot, but it's Eliot, and that means quality.
  • (4/5)
    This is the only book I read on the train that I actually brought with me to read on the train. One of Melville House Books' Art of the Novella series, I was drawn to it as soon as I saw the author. I read Middlemarch a year or so back and absolutely loved it, but I hadn't yet read anything else by Eliot. As I am given to understand, this work both is and is not representative of her novel writing. It of course features her empathetic characterizations and high-minded idealism, but in this novella these traits are interwoven with supernatural suspense.

    A pleasing, old-fashioned yet somehow modern page-turner, this story seems both to praise and condemn the veils of privacy that shield each person's heart and mind from any other. How much misery could be avoided if each couple perhaps knew each other a little better before committing to spend their entire lives together? And yet how much misery to know everything -- every thought and judgement and disappointment in another's mind?

    Highly recommended. In fact, I have a friend who I may have to buy a copy for.
  • (5/5)
    I did not find this to be a lovely book, but I do find that my opinion of this book remains drastically different from most L.T. readers of the book.I thought The Lifted Veil to be quite brilliant. As I read, I felt myself looking into the man's mind and found myself to be momentarily taking on his mental persona as well. I was not bored. I was not piqued. I was not grossed out. The book did not depress me nor did it make me nervous or anxious. I was nothing but a person within another person's ill mind. There was very little within the book that was literal and not simply in his mind.Yes, I thought it very different and as I said rather brilliant; much as I found Dracula when I read it.Sorry ladies and gentleen of the jury. I shall, most likely, be the only one here with this opinion. But then too, I am probably the only one here who has been on a psyche ward for depression, anxiety and panic attack as well. I cannot say if that colored my reading of this book.