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The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea

The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea

Written by Philip Hoare

Narrated by Michael Page


The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea

Written by Philip Hoare

Narrated by Michael Page

ratings:
3.5/5 (15 ratings)
Length:
11 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 22, 2010
ISBN:
9781400185719
Format:
Audiobook

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Description

The whale is the largest, loudest, oldest animal ever to have existed. It is improbable, amazing, and-as anyone who has seen an underwater documentary or visited the display at the American Museum of Natural History
can attest-a powerful source of wonder and delight to millions. The Whale is an extraordinary journey into the world of this fascinating and mysterious animal.



Acclaimed writer Philip Hoare visits the historic whale-hunting towns of New Bedford and Nantucket, wanders the streets of London and Liverpool in search
of Melville's whaling inspiration, and swims with sperm whales in the middle of the Atlantic. Through the course of his journey he explores the troubled history of man and whale; traces the whale's cultural history from Jonah to Moby-Dick, Pinocchio to Free Willy; and seeks to discover why these strange and beautiful
animals continue to exert such a powerful grip on our imagination.



A blend of the travel and nature writing in the tradition of Jonathan Raban and John McPhee, The Whale is a gripping voyage into the heart of Hoare's obsession-and ours.
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 22, 2010
ISBN:
9781400185719
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Philip Hoare is the author of six works of non-fiction, including Leviathan or, The Whale, which won the 2009 Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction. Most recently, The Sea Inside (2013) was published to great critical acclaim. Hoare is also an experienced broadcaster, a Visiting Fellow at Southampton University, and Leverhulme Artist-in-residence at The Marine Institute, Plymouth University, which awarded him an honourary doctorate in 2011. He lives in Southampton.



Reviews

What people think about The Whale

3.3
15 ratings / 15 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Gorgeous, sheer beauty.
  • (2/5)
    Thought I was going to love this book because of subject matter, but I just couldn’t get into it. Not sure if narrator or content.
  • (2/5)
    A slightly disappointing book. It was difficult to weigh up what the author intended. For a large part of the book he was following Herman Melville and Moby Dick. He digressed, reasonably enough, inot the whaling industry and its history. He then digressed further into varoius historical sightings of whales and whales used as fairground attractions. All mixed up with a bit of natural history and biology. It all gave the impression that he had too much research and wasn't sure how to put it all together but he wasn't going to waste any of it.
  • (1/5)
    I was hoping for a microhistory of whales and ended up with a collection of loosely connected things the author associated with whales. Not exactly my cup of tea. If you're interested in a history of whaling in New England or want to know where whale bones are located in the UK you might enjoy this. If you're looking for more information on cetaceans as animals, look elsewhere.
  • (3/5)
    This is a little hard to review. While I did enjoy the book, it was not what I was looking for. I wanted a history of Whaling. This book is three books in onw; Some history of Whaling, a biography of Herman Melville, and last but perhaps most of all, a homage to "Moby Dick." I am still looking for a good history of Whaling, one with numbers, statistics and yes GRAPHS and MAPS.
  • (3/5)
    Refreshingly, this book looks beyond the history of whaling and takes a very literary view to celebrate the author's fascination with whales. The writing is up and down, but it's at its best when Hoare is writing poetically about his love and fascination for them - especially the preface. At times, the book loses its balance by becoming absorbed in one angle more than any other, such as Melville. However, along the way, it takes some really interesting twists and turns to examine aspects of whales few have ever written about, such as the disposal of washed up whales and the history of whale casts at natural history museums. This is definitely a fresh take on the subject for people who have read one too many whaling books.