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A Little Princess

A Little Princess


A Little Princess

ratings:
4.5/5 (79 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Dec 29, 2008
ISBN:
9781400178896
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Sara Crewe is a gifted and well-mannered child, and Captain Crewe, her father, is an extraordinarily wealthy man. So Miss Minchin, headmistress of Sara's new boarding school in London, is pleased to treat Sara as her star pupil-a pampered little princess.



But one dreadful day, Sara's father dies, and her world suddenly collapses around her. All of her lovely things are taken from her, and she is forbidden to associate with her friends. Miss Minchin can now show her greedy and mean-spirited nature to its fullest. The little princess is reduced to a shabby drudge.



But Sara does not break, and with the help of a monkey, an Indian lascar, and the strange, ailing gentleman next door, she not only survives her sufferings but helps those around her.
Publisher:
Released:
Dec 29, 2008
ISBN:
9781400178896
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Frances Hodgson Burnett (1849–1924) grew up in England, but she began writing what was to become The Secret Garden in 1909, when she was creating a garden for a new home in Long Island, New York. Frances was a born storyteller. Even as a young child, her greatest pleasure was making up stories and acting them out, using her dolls as characters. She wrote over forty books in her lifetime.

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Reviews

What people think about A Little Princess

4.4
79 ratings / 93 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite childhood books, about the daughter of a British soldier who was raised in India, but is sent to a British boarding school when her father is sent to war.
  • (5/5)
    I love love love this story! Such a beautiful tale of a young girl! Of course, the fatherdaughter relationship made me sob in parts, but I loved it! So beautiful, pretty and innocent! A little slow at times, but still amazing!
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite childhood books, about the daughter of a British soldier who was raised in India, but is sent to a British boarding school when her father is sent to war.
  • (4/5)
    Lovely classic.
  • (5/5)
    My mother recommended this to me; I read this when I was eight or nine, and multiple times since. There's something so satisfying about the contrasts of Sara Crewe privileged, and Sara Crewe underprivileged. Also a tribute to the power of imagination and storytelling in overcoming adversity. And, of course, a tribute to kindness.
  • (3/5)
    When I finished the book, I felt like it was incomplete--that there were still plot questions left unanswered.
  • (4/5)
    Such a heartwarming little story. Quite different from the movie I watched all the time when I was little. Sara Crewe is an inspiration, and I wish more children were actually as imaginative, selfless, and poised as she is.
  • (4/5)
    Such a cute little book of Sara Crewe, whose father, stationed in India, sends her to boarding school in England. When she starts there she has lots of income which satisfies the insecure, jealous matron of the school. However, when things go downhill for Sara's father and his fortune, Sara's daily life takes a landslide downward. However, she is a very mature child and tries to act like she thinks a princess would act, with a fortune or without. And therein lays the story of her reaction to her situation and her encouragement of others. There is also an ongoing search for a mystery child which culminates at the end of the book. I enjoyed this children's book very much, and think it would be a wonderful book to read along with a child and discuss how he/she might react in a similar situation. I highly recommend this book :)
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book as a child. The illustrations are lovely.
  • (5/5)
    I must have read this book at least half a dozen times as a child. It had my childhood self imagining vividly the happenings, and cheering for Sarah to overcome what tragedies had befallen her. A perfect book for a imaginative young girl,one just past American Girl book reading age.
  • (5/5)
    I watched this movie so much as a child and I always loved it.
    I'm glad I finally tackled this.

    I want to be a princess too.
  • (5/5)
    I must have read this book at least half a dozen times as a child. It had my childhood self imagining vividly the happenings, and cheering for Sarah to overcome what tragedies had befallen her. A perfect book for a imaginative young girl,one just past American Girl book reading age.
  • (4/5)
    Plot: 4 stars
    Characters: 3 1/2 stars
    Style: 3 1/2 stars
    Pace: 3 1/2 stars
    Rounding up because sentimentality.

    I admit, I had higher expectations for this book than the other 2 I read for the same purposes. Partly, it's that I adored the Shirley Temple movie when I was a child. Partly, it wasn't a play trying to be a book. It was a book from the start, and despite all the adaptations, it holds up even still. It's sweet, and if it's simple compared to modern stories, well, that's okay.
  • (4/5)
    Lovely as always. I don't know how often I've read this, but my eyes fill up every time at certain scenes. Having just read Sara Crewe, I had a slightly different view than previously - but the events are basically the same; it's just the description, and the evocation of emotion, that this book has and Sara Crewe mostly missed out on. I do like Sara - she manages to stay just this side of saccharine in her goodness.
  • (5/5)
    Sara Crewe was sent to a little girls home during World War 1 because she found out her father was killed in action during the War. Sara and many other girls living with her are being treated as slaves or servants to a woman who's considered their "guardian." Because of Sara standing up for herself, she's banished from living in the same room with the girls and forced to sleep in the attic and do extra chores. To many who are surprised especially the reader, Sara's dad is found alive and well and he comes to retrieve Sara from the Girls home. This isn't a true story but it is based on true events during World War 1 where singles fathers are forced to have their child stay in a children's home as they've gone to War. Some made it out alive, some weren't so lucky. This is a historic realism book.
  • (5/5)
    That one should never see a film adaptation of a book, without first having read the original, is an idea so unconsciously accepted in my circle of family and friends that it usually admits no debate. But for every rule there are exceptions, and happily for my childhood, Frances Hodgson Burnett's A Little Princess was one of them. I had little taste for sentimental fiction as a child (oh, the irony!), and might have remained indifferent to Burnett's work, had I not seen the brilliant Wonderworks television adaptation of the novel. Released in 1987, it is the only decent film version ever made, and prompted me to read the book, followed in quick succession by The Secret Garden and Little Lord Fauntleroy. Re-read countless times since, they have given me many hours of pleasure, winning a permanent place among my favorite books...The story of a young girl who comes face to face with the cruel, mercenary side of society, A Little Princess has always struck me as a tale of moral courage, simultaneously conventional and subversive. Sara Crewe is the daughter of privilege, despite her temporary poverty and genuine suffering, but she also exhibits a very democratic sensibility, and her behavior is not dictated by monetary concerns. She is as much a friend to poor Becky before the loss of her fortune, as she is afterward; just as she is with Ermengarde. She is, moreover, somewhat disdainful of adult authority, as exemplified by her relationship with Miss Minchin, whose initial "friendliness" she (rightfully) mistrusts. Successful as a portrait of a particular time and place, Burnett's A Little Princess also has qualities that give it a decidedly modern feeling...Addendum: Having just reread this childhood favorite, for our January discussion over at A Thrilling Term at Goodreads: The Girls' School-Story Group, I was struck by the many plot elements that are common in the genre, from the central conceit of a student whose circumstances are greatly reduced, and must work at the school (think Juliet Carrick, in The School at the Chalet, although Madge Bettany is no Miss Minchin), to the idea of one girl who plays "mother" to the younger ones (think L.T. Meade's The Little School-Mothers: A Story for Girls). My new-found familiarity with the genre definitely increased my appreciation of Burnett's classic, which now seemed, not only to be an immensely satisfying story, in its own right, but an interesting example of its genre.
  • (3/5)
    This was a different sort of story than most of what I read and the age of text makes for some interesting differences in social norms and socially acceptable terminology, but the plot left me satisfied. At least those who were cruel didn't get what they wanted and those who were kind recieved what they deserved and far more. Sarah was an interesting main character despite the over-the-top extravagance that she had bestowed upon herself. I don't know. The book was satisfying and for its time it was quite good, but it seems to have lost something in the past century or so.
  • (5/5)
    A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett; (5*)This tale has ever been a favorite of mine. I read it for the first time in 2nd grade, checking it out of the school library. I read it 2 or 3 times a year until I reached my teens and then cut back to once a year, always over the Christmas holidays. By that time I had my own copy and what a treasure that book was to me. As an adult I have continued to read it every few years. This book just fills up some empty space in my heart & soul.It is the story of a very different kind of princess than one might imagine; a motherless child, Sara Crewe, whose father always called her his little princess. When he was called away to fight in the Crimean War he took her to an elite girl's school run by one arrogant Miss Minchin & her cowardly sister. She was their most exclusive student and most all of the girls wanted to be her friend including one very timid scullery maid, Becky, for Sarah was the only girl there to befriend her.When her papa dies penniless, having lost all of his wealth, Sara is forced to give up her schooling, to clean & run errands for the Miss Minchins, (throwing her out in the streets would put their school in a very bad light) & scuttle coal as Becky did. They took all of her pretty clothes & dolls away from her and made her live in a cold, leaky attic room under the eaves of the house. She and Becky soon made up a code whereby they could communicate with each other by knocking on the wall between their rooms. Even though Sara is always cold, never has enough to eat and is friendless except for Becky, she remains the same sweet little girl who was her father's 'little princess'.The man in the neighboring house took a great interest in the girls, especially Sara, and his rooms looked right into hers. It is very interesting how, in the book, his life becomes engaged with hers.The Little Princess is a beloved story tale as are all of the writings of Frances Hodgson Burnett and it happens to be my favorite. This is a wonderful story even for adults and for those of us nearing or going into our 'second' childhood.I very highly recommend it.
  • (5/5)
    I remember watching the movie version when I was little and finding it to be so fanciful and dreamy that the story has stayed with me even into adulthood.

    Suppose...just suppose that one day I become a mother. Oh how I would hope that my baby was a little daughter with whom I could share such charming stories. Wouldn't it be grand?
  • (5/5)
    Sara is a little princess who is trapped in her attic penthouse bedroom in her father's house where their next door neighbors are going to stalk her! It's just like the modern contemporary internet age. That's what Bedford, Westchester County is. She can't leave her room.
  • (5/5)
    One of my all-time favorites, I give this book to every little girl. Ms. Hodgson Burnett tells a beautiful tale of Sara Crewe, a rich girl whose father leaves her at a boarding school while he goes off to war. She is treated like a princess because of her money, which makes some girls like her very much and others not at all. But when her father is presumed dead and funds dry up, all of her beautiful things are taken from her, she is moved to the attic and made to work. A secret benefactor, true friends and a magical tale makes this a charming novel, full of wonderful lessons every little girl should learn.
  • (4/5)
    I absolutely adored The Secret Garden, so I read this, too. When one is a girl, one can believe such fantasies.
  • (4/5)
    It is always difficult for me to read a book after already seeing the movie. Especially in this case where the girls are physically so different. I kept picturing the girl from the movie. I am, however, really glad I read it because there are quite a few differences from the movie. I loved how imaginative Sara is and how well she handled all of the horrible things that happened to her. It is a wonderful book for any young girl to read.
  • (2/5)
    Why did I read this? I'm not a girl. I'm not eight years old. I'm not living in the turn of the century. Well, I decided to read a little young adult fiction aimed at females, just to see what it was like. I'd just read "Jungle Book" and "Just So Stories", so I wanted to see how the other half lives. It apparently lives in a great deal of warm and fluffy feelings. Burnett must have been a genius to stretch this story out as long as she did. Talk about your Mary Sues. The "little princess" in question is a precocious girl from a colorful background traveling in mysterious India, who's dropped off at a girl's school. Everyone loves her, except for the trunchbull Miss Minchin. She spends half the time being the Jesus-figure for her obnoxious spoiled classmates, and the other half being a poor ragamuffin once her fortune's lost and she's relegated to scullery-maid (what is a scullery? And are they so dirty they need maids?). Then she uses her *imagination* (sparklies!) to rise above her poverty and remain a "princess".Anyway, I got an interesting glimpse of female characters during this time, and what they were into. Good thing we got out of that era.
  • (5/5)
    Book downloaded from gutenberg.org

    The other night I was thinking of movies and remembered loving the Shirley Temple movie about a little orpan girl and I wanted to watch it again..I couldn't for the lift of me remember the name of the movie so I spent some time googling and realized that not only was it a movie I wanted to see but a book I would probably enjoy as well. When I saw the publication date was more than 70 years ago I decided to see if gutenberg.org had a copy of it while I wait for my hardcopy to arrive. I downloaded it Sunday afternoon and have been reading it every spare moment that I can use my home computer.

    The book is so much better than I remember the movie being (which isn't saying much since it's been 15 years since I last watched it), but I plan on watching both the original & the new version of the movie sometime after I finish the book.

  • (5/5)
    One of my favourite childhood books that I can read even now as an adult!
  • (5/5)
    so good! I remember loving my mom reading this to my sister and I when we were younger.
  • (4/5)
    This must surely be one of the sweetest, loveliest books a girl could read in childhood. It's been a long time but reading it again all these years down the line (in my early 20s), it still holds such charm, wonder and profound messages about class, poverty and happiness that I know it'll be returning to my shelf to read again and pass on to my own children.It tells the story of Sara Crewe, a rich little girl brought up in India by her beloved father, who moves to England to go to boarding school at the gloomy seminary belonging to the formidable Miss Minchin. She is the star pupil, dressed in finery and always happy to share her good fortune and vivid imagination with her classmates. But when a tragic twist of fate strips her of everything, Sara ends up a poor orphan working as a drudge in the seminary where once she was idolised by her fellow pupils. Miss Minchin uses this as a fine opportunity to take a sort of revenge on this strange little girl, who she has never understood but has always indulged thanks to her wealth. But no matter how hard her life becomes, she remains generous and polite to those around her, rich and poor alike, pretending that she is a princess in order to keep her morals and spirits strong. Finally, just as even her fiery spirit is at breaking point, an English gentleman who has been living in India moves into the house next door and magical things start to happen as their interest in each other grows. Of course everything will come right in the end, but I won't give away any more because it deserves to be read and enjoyed...This is a beautiful, moving, and inspiring novel, whether you're 6 or 60! It is well written, with highly individual and well-rounded characters, and a wealth of description which makes it very atmospheric and allows even a child to see Sara's London in vivid detail. There are images in the book which I could still remember clearly and recognise years after I read it as a little girl, and even now I was holding my breath and waiting for everything to fall into place! In today's selfish modern society it also provides a reminder of how a little generosity and kindness goes a long way, and is a perfect fairy tale for littler princesses too. I'd also recommend The Secret Garden for a slightly less girlie but equally sweet, timeless and beautiful story.
  • (4/5)
    A Little Princess was one of my favorite movies growing up but I had never read the book. I enjoyed it but I think I prefer the movie just to see her stories come to life.
  • (5/5)
    Sara Crewe lives in India with her father, but is moved to a boarding school in England when he is convinced it will be best for her. She is very rich and is treated very well until her father dies after losing all of his money. She is banished to the attic and forced to work as a servant. She is treated horribly and is close to starving and freezing all the time, but she remains kind, thoughtful, and graceful. She catches the attention of a rich neighbor who she discovers is her father's business partner. He takes her in and she takes the other servant girl with her.I adore Frances Hodgson Burnett books, and A Little Princess in particular. I think Sara Crewe is a wonderful role model for children. She is unwavering in her belief in right and wrong and will not be bullied by anyone. She is open and honest and cares deeply about everyone, including the mice who infest the attic. I will never forget the part where she buys some bread and gives it to a starving girl outside, even though she is malnourished herself, which inspires the baker to hire that girl. I think the lesson, about doing what is right no matter what and caring about others, is a beautiful one. I also think the old-fashioned writing, though difficult, would be perfect for expanding kids' vocabulary and sentence structure, and fits right in the the Common Core Standards.