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The Code of the Woosters

The Code of the Woosters


The Code of the Woosters

ratings:
4.5/5 (66 ratings)
Length:
1 hour
Released:
Feb 20, 2006
ISBN:
9781580814324
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In the best known of the Bertie and Jeeves series, Bertie's aunt pressures him to steal a silver creamer, and he nearly gets lynched, arrested and engaged by mistake. As always, Jeeves is on hand with a last-minute brainstorm to set everything straight.

An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring Rosalind Ayres, Patrice Egleston, Martin Jarvis, Kelly Nespor, Kenneth J. Northcott, Henry M. Odum, Mark Richard, Nicolas Sandys and Thomas M. Shea.
Released:
Feb 20, 2006
ISBN:
9781580814324
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (1881-1975) was an English author. Though he was named after his godfather, the author was not a fan of his name and more commonly went by P.G Wodehouse. Known for his comedic work, Wodehouse created reoccurring characters that became a beloved staple of his literature. Though most of his work was set in London, Wodehouse also spent a fair amount of time in the United States. Much of his work was converted into an “American” version, and he wrote a series of Broadway musicals that helped lead to the development of the American musical. P.G Wodehouse’s eclectic and prolific canon of work both in Europe and America developed him to be one of the most widely read humorists of the 20th century.

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What people think about The Code of the Woosters

4.7
66 ratings / 29 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Always fun and kooky, reading about Wooster and Jeeves.
  • (5/5)
    Wodehouse doing Wodehouse - classic!
  • (4/5)
    Book is quick and fun read, but perhaps because I've gone on binge reading of PG Wodehouse (this is 4th), I didn't laugh out loud as often as I did with earlier books even though this is supposed to be most funny book from him. Nevertheless not bad at all and in fact pretty decent read.
  • (5/5)
    This stands alongside Right Ho, Jeeves as Wodehouse at his best, with Bertie Wooster finding himself up against it as never before while Jeeves rallies round to save 'the young master'. The novel is utterly idyllic.Many of the old favourite characters make an appearance with Aunt Dahlia as ebullient and strident as ever while Gussie Fink-Nottle and Madeleine Bassett continue their feeble meandering through the world. We also meet some new characters who will develop into central figures in the Wooster oeuvre: Sir Watkyn Bassett (former magistrate and father of the simpering Madeleine), Roderick Spode, would-be leader of men, and Stephanie ("Stiffy") Byng, neice and ward of Sir Watkyn and the owner of Bartholomew, the redoubtable Aberdeen terrier.Roderick Spode is an interesting character as he represents almost the only instance of Wodehouse indulging in political satire. Spode is an aspiring politician and is clearly modelled on Sir Oswald Mosley, leading a far-right group called 'The Saviours of Britain' who roam the streets wearing black shorts (yes, shorts rather than shirts, because, as Gussie Fink-Nottle explains to Bertie, 'by the time Spode formed his association, there were no shirts left'. He does, however, have a dark, zealously-guarded secret which will become central to the plot. He has also worshipped Madeleine and has sworn to punish anyone who in any way mars her happiness.There are some classic set pieces here, on a par with Gussie's speech to the Market Snodsbury school from Right Ho, Jeeves, including bertie's first encounter with Sir Watkyn Bassett and Spode in an antique shop in the Brompton Road and Constable Oates's misadventure while cycling unaware of Bartholomew's proximity.As is always the case with Wodehouse's novels, and particularly the adventures of Bertie and Jeeves, the plot is sinuous to the point of defeating summary. Suffice it to say that it revolves around a hideous silver cow creamer! The numerous twists are deftly managed, and all of the loose ends are resolved in full. Pure entertainment from start to finish.
  • (4/5)
    This book felt a bit like reading The Importance of Being Earnest, because it had the fun sense of everyone making a bad situation worse, when they were actually trying to fix it. Bertie Wooster is a lovable scoundrel and his friends and family have personalities as eccentric as their names. This was a fun book, with several fiascos revolving around a silver cow creamer that two silver collectors must have. Bertie ends up going in to "pinch" the cow creamer from one collector, and ends up having to deal with a judge, a police officer, a "Dictator" and a couple marriage plots thrown in for good measure. A quick, funny read.
  • (5/5)
    P.G. Wodehouse forever! Such a fun change to have multiple actors instead of one.
  • (5/5)
    Always enjoyable - a classic convoluted Bertie and Jeeves tale.
  • (4/5)
    Fluffy and fun. Just the antidote to the pandemic. Listen on!
  • (5/5)
    The crown jewel of the Jeeves and Wooster series.
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The San Francisco Chronicle once wrote that “He who has not met Wodehouse has not lived a full life.” I concur with that comment! Wodehouse had the most incredible talent, that of writing exceedingly well. But it was one that was able to add unbridled fun in every other phrase—sometimes each single phrase for pages. Interesting of notice is the fact that, 20 years before his death, P. G. Wodehouse became an American citizen—which, in my book, counts several more points for him! The TV series (starring Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry) was able to only partially capture Bertie’s persona; interestingly, at least from this book, it is very hard to turn Jeeves into an incarnate person… Anyway, this book was published in 1938, but smart humor is timeless and this is one of the instances to prove it. Paraphrasing Anthony Lane of the New York, Wodehouse is the funniest, wittiest writer the human race has ever produced. (And next time someone calls you an "ignorant American" for using the term "old-world," refer to this book--see "Quotes"!) In a BBC broadcast in 1961 Evelyn Waugh said: “Mr. Wodehouse’s idyllic world can never stale. He will continue to release future generations from captivity that may be more irksome than our own. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in.”

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    Another classic comedy by P. G. Wodehouse.As expected, Bertie Wooster is drawn into mishaps and mayhem by friends and an aunt. Luckily, Jeeves is around to suggest ways out of one amusing (for the reader) scrape after another.Of the entertaining cast of characters, Madeline Basset is my favourite. She doesn’t feature as much in this novel as when she first enters the Jeeves saga, but her infrequent appearances are nevertheless among the story’s highlights.A rather good read, dash it.
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    hilarious.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Jeeves and Wooster are busy tracking down an antique creamer, making sure the right people get married. Excellent plot, great writing!

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I read an unusual question the other day. It asked, "In a sensationalist age, when everything quickly becomes a matter of passionate intensity, is there a place for the airy trifle?"There are two correct answers to this question. The first is 'Yes, definitely.' The second, and best way to answer this is to just hand the person asking a copy of any Jeeves & Wooster book or, for that matter, anything written by the brilliantly hilarious [author:P.G. Wodehouse7963]. In this insane world, who doesn't need a little light-hearted piffle on occasion."Am I right, Jeeves?""Quite so, sir."

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    This was my first Wodehouse on audio CD, and it was absolutely fantastic from start to finish. I've read and enjoyed several Wodehouse titles so far, but listening to Wodehouse on CD is a completely different experience. I loved every minute. This story is a wonderfully convoluted plot in which Bertie goes to Totleigh Towers in quest of a hideous silver cow creamer for his uncle — or rather, for his Aunt Dahlia to give to his uncle to butter him up for the big cheque she needs for her ladies' journal. But Bertie is also winging his way to Totleigh to answer a desperate summons from his old pal Augustus Fink-Nottle. It seems that Gussie's engagement to Madeleine Bassett is off, which is terrible news for Bertie because whenever she's not engaged to Gussie, Madeleine considers herself engaged to Bertie. She is, Bertie says with revulsion, the sort of woman who would creep up behind her husband at breakfast, clasp her hands over his eyes, and say gleefully, "Guess who!" I shiver with Bertie in horror!But as usual, there's so much more to the plot than just that. Stiffy Byngs, Aunt Dahlia, Roderick Spode, Sir Watkin Bassett, and several other great characters also have a lot to do in pursuit of matrimony, leather-covered notebooks, and silver cow creamers. Wodehouse uses each person's distinct personality and motives to press his finger firmly on the funny-bone, and the result is merciless hilarity.Jonathan Cecil narrates this edition, and a fine job he does of it. His different voices for all the characters are excellent. He switches between them so effortlessly in the quick dialogue. His voice is smooth, his accent is perfect, and he has a great feel for comic timing and delivery.I listened to this while driving home from work for the past two weeks, and it was a rare day that did not find me laughing aloud as I drove. I'm sure it looked a bit odd to my fellow motorists, but when Wodehouse is really tightening the vise you have no choice. Laughter will out. This is highly recommended!
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    This is a delightful romp of a book. I am pretty sure the best word to describe this book is fun. The plot constantly twists and turns always to the disadvantage of Bertrand who relies on his man Jeeves to help turn the tables. Wodehouse wrote something like 96 books which leaves me with only 94 more to read. I can't wait for the next Jeeves adventure.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I needed jollying up, and this was just the ticket, in the company of buoyant Bertie Wooster. He has a wonderful, original turn of phrase, gets into ridiculous scrapes, and you know Jeeves will come to the aid of the party. I don't ever remember watching Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry as these characters, but absolutely visualised them as I read. Subsequently googled them, and think Laurie is absolutely spot on (and a very youthful Fry, if he could be aged a few years).If you enjoy inventive similes, this will raise your spirits.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    Very funny. Even though the plot is predictable the writing is so good that you don't care.
  • (5/5)
    Part of group of Jeeves and Wooster stories about Gussie Fink-Nottle and Madeline Bassett and their friends and relatives. A silver cow creamer wanted by the husband of Bertie's Aunt Dahlia, a fascist who loves Madeline and has a guilty secret, a clumsy curate figure in this. Jeeves of course saves the day and there are lots of literary references retold in Bertie's inimitable style, and it's funny, and --- if only the world were as innocent as this one, where you can laugh at a fascist leader.
  • (4/5)
    Not, to my mind, quite as crystalline a work of perfection as some other Woodehouse*, but thoroughly splendid. I believe it is the first Woodehouse to contain the reference to the cloven hooves of aunts, and the second in which someone is referred to as a "dream rabbit." Notable also for the set-piece with the bicycle, and the telling-off of the loathsome Spode.*Making any criticism of Woodehouse brings to mind A.A. Milne's caution to readers of Wind in the Willows: "don't be so ridiculous as to suppose that you are sitting in judgment on my taste, or on the art of Kenneth Grahame. You are merely sitting in judgment on yourself. You may be worthy: I don't know, But it is you who are on trial." To oppose Wodehouse in any serious way is literally to oppose the right order of the heavens.
  • (5/5)
    I want to say that this was a 'laugh out loud' kind of book but I'd be lying because I don't laugh out loud when reading a book nor have I seen many people laugh out loud while reading a book. I think there may be exceptions to this but have no explanations for this phenomena except maybe the possibility of drugs or the lack thereof. I do laugh inside my head pretty loudly and with this book the inside of my head was roaring. My brain was in tears.Bertram Wooster and Jeeves are able to solve every problem that comes their way and problems come their way non-stop. I couldn't help but think of Fawlty Towers and Basil Fawlty. I'm pretty sure John Cleese must have read a bunch of Wodehouse. In fact I'd bet something of no value to me that Cleese was a huge Wodehouse fan... something of no value to me not because I don't feel strongly about the Cleese/Wodehouse connection but because I'm a lousy gambler.It's a story about a cow-creamer, police hats, the formation and break-ups and reformations of marriages, and the enjoyment of a good brandy.I l. until I c., inside my head that is.My first Wodehouse. It will not be my last.
  • (5/5)
    This was my first Wodehouse on audio CD, and it was absolutely fantastic from start to finish. I've read and enjoyed several Wodehouse titles so far, but listening to Wodehouse on CD is a completely different experience. I loved every minute. This story is a wonderfully convoluted plot in which Bertie goes to Totleigh Towers in quest of a hideous silver cow creamer for his uncle — or rather, for his Aunt Dahlia to give to his uncle to butter him up for the big cheque she needs for her ladies' journal. But Bertie is also winging his way to Totleigh to answer a desperate summons from his old pal Augustus Fink-Nottle. It seems that Gussie's engagement to Madeleine Bassett is off, which is terrible news for Bertie because whenever she's not engaged to Gussie, Madeleine considers herself engaged to Bertie. She is, Bertie says with revulsion, the sort of woman who would creep up behind her husband at breakfast, clasp her hands over his eyes, and say gleefully, "Guess who!" I shiver with Bertie in horror!But as usual, there's so much more to the plot than just that. Stiffy Byngs, Aunt Dahlia, Roderick Spode, Sir Watkin Bassett, and several other great characters also have a lot to do in pursuit of matrimony, leather-covered notebooks, and silver cow creamers. Wodehouse uses each person's distinct personality and motives to press his finger firmly on the funny-bone, and the result is merciless hilarity.Jonathan Cecil narrates this edition, and a fine job he does of it. His different voices for all the characters are excellent. He switches between them so effortlessly in the quick dialogue. His voice is smooth, his accent is perfect, and he has a great feel for comic timing and delivery.I listened to this while driving home from work for the past two weeks, and it was a rare day that did not find me laughing aloud as I drove. I'm sure it looked a bit odd to my fellow motorists, but when Wodehouse is really tightening the vise you have no choice. Laughter will out. This is highly recommended!
  • (4/5)
    I just finished The Code of the Woosters and while I must say that I was enjoying it throughout, by the end I was quite taken by Mr. P.G. Wodehouse. This was my first Wodehouse and while it was not the belly-laugh I had anticipated, I understand he is an acquired taste. I was so taken with the way Wodehouse ended this story. It was so unexpected; the sweetness of it:"The year's at the Spring, the day's at the morn, morning's at seven, the hill-side's dew-pearled. The lark's on the wing, the snail's on the thorn,God's in His heaven, all's right with the world." (quoted by Jeeves)And then later at the very end of the book: "And presently the eyes closed, the muscles relaxed, the breathing became soft and regular, and sleep, which does something which has slipped my mind to the something sleeve of care, poured over me in a healing wave."Do words get much more beautiful than that?
  • (5/5)
    This book was SO fun. I love the TV series with Fry and Laurie, and I didn't realize until I had started that this is the novel of my favorite episode, Jeeves Saves the Cow Creamer. For the uninitiated, it is fun and lighthearted and everyone can chuckle along. I personally can't help reading it in my head with an English accent. It's a fast read yet very intelligent, which is a hard combination to pull off. I look forward to more Wodehouse in my future!
  • (5/5)
    If you want to laugh, and you like farce, particularly English farce that pokes fun at their class system, I think you'll love this book. Hilarious. The plot twists and turns are terrific. The Vintage Books edition provides an informative introduction by Alexander Cockburn.
  • (4/5)
    First time to read Wodehouse and really enjoyed the comedy. Jeeves was great and Bertie getting himself caught in the various schemes were funny.
  • (4/5)
    Simple, predictable...and laugh out loud funny. Very enjoyable read and impossible to be downcast while reading Wodehouse.A steady reading diet of Wodehouse, I imagine, would be like working through five pounds of boxed chocolates. Wonderful in the beginning but sick making by the second tier.
  • (5/5)
    Like Austen, Wodehouse is at his best writing on the small ivory of an English village and the manor, but of course, his characters are vastly different from Austen's, and I doubt old Jane would relish the comparison. This book, set at Totleigh Towers, is one of his best, with the frightful Madeline Basset, Gussie Fink-Nottle - the newt-addicted dunderhead, and the hideous Spode. What the MacGuffin is that sets the plot in motion is irrelevant (it's a cow creamer, if you must know), but all the usual set-pieces are here - Bertie becoming engaged without wanting to, dreadful country hospitality, and lots of cocktails. A good way to while away an afternoon.
  • (5/5)
    Hi-Larious misadventures of Bertie Wooster and the gentleman's gentleman Jeeves. Bonus for this selection are the stories of Jeeves introduction into Bertie's life.