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Shadowland

Shadowland

Written by Peter Straub

Narrated by Phil Gigante


Shadowland

Written by Peter Straub

Narrated by Phil Gigante

ratings:
4/5 (30 ratings)
Length:
17 hours
Released:
Jun 5, 2012
ISBN:
9781455830268
Format:
Audiobook

Description

First setting: an all-male prep school in Arizona, where two sensitive freshmen form a bond based on their interest in magic tricks. Second setting: the labyrinthine house of a weird magician uncle in New England, where the two boys spend a memorable summer being trained in the art of illusion. Or is it real magic? Third setting: an alternate world where dark forces are at play-forces that first show up at the school, but intensify their power throughout the summer.

Only one of them will make it through

Released:
Jun 5, 2012
ISBN:
9781455830268
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Peter Straub is the New York Times bestselling author of more than a dozen novels, including A Dark Matter. He has won the Bram Stoker Award for his novels Lost Boy Lost Girl and In the Night Room, as well as for his recent collection 5 Stories. Straub was the editor of the two-volume Library of American anthology The American Fantastic Tale. He lives in New York City.



Reviews

What people think about Shadowland

4.1
30 ratings / 11 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    I didn’t love this as much as I did the first time around, but it was still pretty damn good.
  • (2/5)
    Occasionally interesting, but fails to sustain the energy and horror of "Ghost Story". Way too long.
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    This book is all over the map but after a second listening I enjoyed it much more.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    2011, Jan.: #2Another book and another leftover from last year's reading. This time from a month of horror planned and just about ignored completely in October (I hardly got past King and Straub and mostly King's entirely mediocre and disappointing Talisman). As a big fan of Straub's Ghost Story, as well as his much more 'literary' (and some could say: sexy) aspirations and style of writing (that completely trump Stephen King's slapdash shenanigans; I'll just needlessly toss that in there, o yah!), this bastard was a big bore. A literal bore. Must mean something coming from a person whose use of 'boring' as an insult is so rare as to be nonexistent, partic. if we're dealing with beach reads that are meant to sweep me off my feet and keep me up all night like this here Shadowland. Ungh.We don't need a drag-ass setup of 150 pages that leads to a zip-zip-zoom along a badly-paced, potential-oozing, completely nonsensical good v. evil plot, one of the most obvious and overblown I've read in a damn long time, which is a bummer, because I understand what Straub was half-heartedly going for here, a sort of riff off of John Barth's riff of of Joseph Campbell's riff off of Carl Jung, ancient mythology and human nature--just...you know, as mainstream 'horror'--and I like that dream; just a shame he couldn't reach it.60%[740]

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Read as a teen, this book was horrifying and had many layers to the story. I was glad to see that when reading it as an adult, the story held up. The story begins at a fancy prep school. Del and Tom become friends quickly because they are both fascinated with magic. There are all kinds of things going on at the school - the students are having nightmares and other odd things are happening. Once school is over for the year, Tom accepts an invitation from Del to spend the summer holiday at Del's Uncle Collins' estate.It turns out that Uncle Collins is a retired magician and plans on teaching them a lot over the holiday. Some of it is fun and some of it is terrifying. The problem is deciding which is real and which is not. Uncle Collins is also an alcoholic and half-crazy.Some of the scenes are still disturbing to me, but nothing that shouldn't be read. There is a crucifixion scene that is very realistic and disturbing, but without it the book wouldn't be the same.This is a great book as an introduction to what Peter Straub does. He is right up there with Stephen King - just as scary, using everyday objects and people, for the most part. Excellent Spring Break or Summer Break reading!!

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    Shadowland was one of the first horror books I read growing up (I think I may have been twelve at the time that I read it). Along with some of the early works of Stephen King, it was one of the big reasons I became addicted to the genre and later became a writer. Shadowland is a richly written, complex books that I quickly became engrossed in. Shadowland follows two friends Del and Tom in boarding school. Both boys are into magic and dabble at it while they are in school. After the school year is over, they spend the summer at Del's uncle's house. Uncle Collins is a crazed, retired magician who gives the boy's a tutorial in real magic. As the book evolves, it starts to become clear that Uncle Collins isn't all in the up and up, something that Tom begins to pick up on. He comes to the conclusion that if he and Del are to survive the summer at Shadowland, they are going to have to escape. The only problem is that Uncle Collins has taken a keen interest in Tom and isn't about to let him go.Shadowland is one of those books that perfectly fits the description of "hard to put down". Straub does a brilliant job of making the characters come alive. I've read many of Peter Straub's novels and this is my favorite. He did an excellent job of weaving in sub-plots and creating a story world that was both highly entertaining and very rewarding to read through. A definite horror classic, I would strongly advise to pick up a copy if you haven't already read this one.Carl Alves - author of Two For Eternity