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Where the Wild Things Are

Where the Wild Things Are

Written by Maurice Sendak

Narrated by Peter Schickele


Where the Wild Things Are

Written by Maurice Sendak

Narrated by Peter Schickele

ratings:
4.5/5 (348 ratings)
Length:
12 minutes
Released:
Jan 1, 1989
ISBN:
9780545554763
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Max is the hero of this beloved children's classic in which he makes mischief, sails away, tames the wild things and returns home for supper.
Released:
Jan 1, 1989
ISBN:
9780545554763
Format:
Audiobook


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Reviews

What people think about Where the Wild Things Are

4.4
348 ratings / 402 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Max gets in trouble with his mother and gets sent to his bedroom for the rest his night. He uses his imagination to go to a land where he is a king and continues with his romp. When he starts to feel home sick he returns home where a hot dinner is waiting for him.
  • (3/5)
    It is a nice books. My son liked it but it did not really stuck with him. I think it was a bit overrated. He also got kinda scared at first.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book because it is relatable to children; They are adventurous and imaginative. The pictures show Maxs' imagination at work while he is leading a group of monsters. I think K-3 would love this book.
  • (5/5)
    This book would be perfect for a read-aloud in grades K-3. I think this would be appropriate for boys, but some girls may find it enjoyable. I could use this book to teach a lesson about fantasy and imagination as well. I see the audience liking this book because it is silly and adventurous. I think they would also like it because it is in Max's point of view, which would be easier to comprehend than in someone else's point of view.
  • (5/5)
    A marvelous adventure in imagination.
  • (5/5)
    Essential childhood reading!
  • (5/5)
    Where the Wild Things Are is one of those truly rare books that can be enjoyed equally by a child and a grown-up. If you disagree, then it's been too long since you've attended a wild rumpus. Max dons his wolf suit in pursuit of some mischief and gets sent to bed without supper. Fortuitously, a forest grows in his room, allowing his wild rampage to continue unimpaired. Sendak's color illustrations (perhaps his finest) are beautiful, and each turn of the page brings the discovery of a new wonder.The wild things--with their mismatched parts and giant eyes--manage somehow to be scary-looking without ever really being scary; at times they're downright hilarious. Sendak's defiantly run-on sentences--one of his trademarks--lend the perfect touch of stream of consciousness to the tale, which floats between the land of dreams and a child's imagination.This Sendak classic is more fun than you've ever had in a wolf suit, and it manages to reaffirm the notion that there's no place like home. - Amazon.com
  • (5/5)
    Definitely a winner!
  • (3/5)
    Glorious illustrations.
  • (5/5)
    Alltime favorite.
  • (5/5)
    ANOTHER FUNNY ONE.
  • (5/5)
    Where The Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak is one of my favorite books of all time. This book encourages the students to use there imagination. This book also presents awesome pictures that capture your eyes. I would highly recommend this book to all teachers, i know that i will use this book in my classroom. This book can be read before an activity to get the students minds working.
  • (5/5)
    Max, a young boy, is sent to his room without dinner. He is called a "wild thing," and as he is in his room, his adventure takes off, as his room turns into a large adventure that Max embarks upon. The artwork continues to grow, and at the end of the adventure, the artwork shrinks back, as Max is shown love by his mother, and is allowed to come to dinner.
  • (5/5)
    SummaryLittle Max dressed in his wolf suit and made some trouble that night. His mother sent him to his room with eating his supper. Max discovers his room to be a forest. As his imagination grow he becomes king of the wild animals and "lets the wild rumpus start". After a while, Max was lonely and want to be where he was loved. He left the wild animals only to discover that his dinner was waiting for him and it was still hot.Personal ReactionI love how the Max's imagination grow, and grows! I especially love the several pages where the wild animals are making all kinds of "rumpus" and these pages are without words. A different story can be created every time during this section.Classroom Extension ideas1. The children can create a classroom story by going around the room and adding to the previous idea of a wild adventure. 2. The children can created their wild animal with miscellaneous craft supplies. They can use recycled materials such as paper towel and toilet paper tubes for the base 3. The teacher can have a lesson about moods, especially anger and thankfulness
  • (5/5)
    Sometimes you go to bed without dinner and you have to pass your time, right? This imaginative little does that better than anyone when he takes himself to a place where anyone can "rumpass". The illustrations draw you into this book and brings this little boy's imagination to life on the page. I love the subtle details that make you ponder what the illustrated was trying to say, such as; why the monsters had human feet? Where the monsters other humans in costumes? Could this be some greater meaning that I have yet to understand? Regardless, the book is a classic and remains so for a reason.
  • (5/5)
    This book shows the power of a child's imagination and the comfort of home.
  • (5/5)
    Another childhood favorite. Kids always seem to love this book. It is perfect for teaching about imagination and plot development.
  • (5/5)
    This classic and iconic book tells the story of Max. One night, when he's feeling more mischievous than usual, his mother sends him to bed with no supper. He soon finds himself sailing far away, to where the wild things are. They react to his monstrous ways and he soon becomes their king. But he begins to miss home and soon finds himself leaving the exotic jungle.There's a reason that this book is a classic. It's absolutely wonderful. The illustrations are phenomenal and the text itself is superb. Max's story is one that will capture the imagination of adults and children alike. It's something that should be in every child's library. It's great for early readers or as a read-aloud.
  • (5/5)
    Where the Wild Things Are is one of my all time favorite books to read. I love how Max ends up in this magical forest and conquers and becomes king of the beasts. Every child should be read this book. You must read it in an animated tone. This is a great book to use when discussing fantasy stories.
  • (4/5)
    Max is sent to his room without any supper, but his imagination ferries him across an ocean to the land where the wild things are, and he soon becomes their king. After a while, Max tires of wild rumpuses and swinging in trees - even being the king of the wild things loses its glamour - and he just wants to go home. The wild things threaten to eat him up, but Max knows that trick, so he sails away from the monsters, landing safely in his own room. There, his hungry stomach is delighted to learn that his mom left him dinner after all This picture book by Maurice Sendak has become so popular and esteemed that most English readers know it, adults and children alike. The illustrations are beautiful, with quirky monsters that are fierce and lovable, a rascal of a young boy, and an exotic setting aptly depicted. The story is simple, making it great for read-alouds, and presents an exploration of a boy's potential imagination, that is both child-like and yet mature, as well as showing how a boy copes with his own anger and being disciplined. The monsters are fun in themselves, and certainly hold my young daughter's interest. Once upon a time, children's books were very different. They were about model children always doing the right thing. This story uses a main character that is not perfect - he makes mistakes and has a temper. Yet Max is a good boy at heart, even with his flaws, and he knows that he has to return to the real world, that his family is more important than being the wild child he wants to be sometimes. I find it beneficial to read stories like this to children, where they can relate to the characters and see that they are not alone in their emotions. In the end, the story has Max making the right choice, to return to the family he loves; the book shows that it is natural to be angry and to want to escape, but also encourages children to let their tempers pass. All of these factors create a genuine story that is inviting and creative, and that will continue to capture children's attention for years to come.
  • (4/5)
    Caldecott Medal Winner - This wonderfully illustrated classic tells the tale of Max who after being bad is sent to bed without dinner. Suddenly creatures begin to appear in max's room & max learns that being wild with the creatures can be a tiring fete. Would be nice to show with the movie depending on age group to discuss the similarities/differences between the two.
  • (2/5)
    One of those books from my childhood that I was expected to like but didn't.
  • (3/5)
    This story follows Max into a realm of fantasy and the unknown. Sent to bed without supper, he sails off to a faraway land where he is king of the wild things. He grows tired of the mystical land of beasts and sails back where he finds his supper waiting for him on the nightstand. This encourages readers to use their imaginations and to not be afraid of the unknown. Recommended for children in 3rd grade and up!
  • (5/5)
    Summary: This book is a modern fantasy book about a little boy named Max, and he takes a trip to a land where all the wild things are. He plays with them and they make him the king. After a while, Max realizes that he misses home, so he heads back with the memories of the adventure.Personal Reaction: I love this book, I enjoy the fact that the author doesn't specify if it is a dream or anything. It is left up to the readers' imagination!Classroom Extension: This is an awesome book that portrays modern fantasy, it would be a good book to go over if you're needing your students to ever create creatures or create another land.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a boy named Max who imagines to go to a place where the wild things are. He tames the creatures and then becomes their king! Finally, he smells something good and decides to return home.Great book to foster imagination X reality. Also great to teach vocabulary!Reading Journal: counts as 1 Picture Book.
  • (5/5)
    I have loved this book ever since i was a child. Now as an adult it has its own special place in my library. I find myself reading it when i have had a rough day. The feelings of the easy, loving childhood that once was comes reeling back. Wonderful book, i love it!
  • (5/5)
    Such a good book! I have such fond memories of this book when I was younger and it's nice to know I can read this book 20 years later & it's just as good. The illustrations are wonderful, it's interesting, and it can definitely entertain a child at almost any age.
  • (5/5)
    SUMMARY:Max gets into trouble, and is sent to his room with no dinner. His room turns into the world around him and he sails to a land far away. This land is full of the wild things, the wild things that want to eat him. He proves to them he is the wildest thing and they make him their king. After a time in the distant land he misses home, so he returns. When he is back in his room he finds his dinner waiting for him.PERSONAL REACTION:This book is one of my all time favorites. The wild things are so imaginative, and there is a story of a mom's unconditional love.CLASSROOM EXTENSIONS:1.) Everyone can create their own version of a wild thing, maybe by adding paints to the middle of the page, folding the paper and smearing the paint around. when it's unfolded the children can use their imagination to talk about the new wild thing they have made.2.)
  • (5/5)
    I think this is a great book about a young boy's wild imagination. He wants to be wild and tough like the monsters he visits in his dream, but realizes that he prefers to be with his mother, who loves him. The illustrations tell the story really well, especially when they take over the full page and narrate the story.
  • (5/5)
    This book is wonderful because it is a great portrayal of the imagination of a child. The illustrations in the book are wonderful and it really takes you to the world of the wild things. The pages with no words tell a great story. As I was reading it to my twin four year olds for bedtime, I asked them to tell me what was going on in those pages without words and it was interesting to see their perspective. After I finished the book, I asked them to tell me what they thought about the book and they understood the message of it completely. I had never read this book before and I am glad I was able to share that first time with my children.