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Stone Soup

Stone Soup

Written by Marcia Brown

Narrated by Marcia Brown


Stone Soup

Written by Marcia Brown

Narrated by Marcia Brown

ratings:
4.5/5 (74 ratings)
Length:
10 minutes
Released:
Jan 1, 1983
ISBN:
9780545258692
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Three clever soldiers devise a plan to get food and lodging from the selfish inhabitants of a French village during the time of Napoleon.
Released:
Jan 1, 1983
ISBN:
9780545258692
Format:
Audiobook


About the author



Reviews

What people think about Stone Soup

4.5
74 ratings / 52 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    Genre: FolkloreThis story focuses on three soldiers that are tired and hungry and need a place to stay as they march on down a long road and then how they trick some village people in making soup out of food they would not offer freely when the soldiers asked for it. Many folktales have tricks and clever characters that get what they need or want by being smart. The three soldiers make the people think they make soup from stones but really the soldiers were just getting the village people to add real food to the soup as they went along making it. The book only uses one color, orange and the rest is gray and black and white. It looks a lot like wood cuts and water colors.
  • (3/5)
    Three soldiers come into a small village seeking food and shelter, but everyone says there is no food or place for them to stay. The soldiers say they will make "stone soup" out in the town square instead, intriguing the villagers with this mysterious dish. As they lament the lack of carrot, meat, barley, etc. in the soup, the villagers suddenly recall having a small amount of said ingredient to add to the pot. By the end of the evening, a large feast is shared by villagers and soldiers alike!Once again, I find myself having to say how I'm not really a huge fan of traditional fairy tales/fables. I can't exactly place my finger on why, but this story did little for me. Others have commented on how it's ultimately a story about sharing, although it seems to be more one of trickery, and about the soldiers' resilience (although that could be argued that it's the mighty strong-arming the weak, as usual). Whatever it is, it's not a story that particularly resonates with me. My 6-year-old niece also walked away from this title halfway through reading it, which is highly unusual for her.The award-winning illustrations are in a style I typically like -- black and white drawings with splashes of one color only (in this case red). The red does add liveliness to the pictures, but something about the illustrations feels very old and dated (beyond just the historic setting). Overall, I wasn't particularly impressed with this book, even though I know it is generally considered a classic of children's literature. It just wasn't my cup of tea.
  • (5/5)
    Another old childhood favorite of mine is Marcia Brown's fun-filled Stone Soup. My elementary school classmates and I had been read this fantastic picture book by our librarian, and I can remember hanging on to every word of the story as I studied the illustrations. Stone Soup is a lovely picture book for young children who are just beginning their reading journey. And no child will be disappointed in this one.

    Stone Soup had been the third book that I had the pleasure of reading as a child?only preceded by Hamburgers and Ice Cream for Dessert, and Gila Monsters Meet You at the Airport. And they are all incredible stories for the developing young mind. Five-star legends in children's literature.

  • (4/5)
    I first heard this story on an episode of Little House on the Prairie, but until today I had never read the book. Cute story and a good lesson.
  • (4/5)
    Marcia Brown’s retelling of the French folktale, Stone Soup, is truly a classic. This tale of trickery is delightfully illustrated with pen, ink, and black and orange watercolor illustrations which capture the ambiance of 18th century provincial life. The visiting soldiers are French and look vaguely Napoleonic, and the fearful peasants seem to be Dutch. A parable on sharing and caring displays the timeless foibles of human nature, and how curiosity can become generosity. Newer versions of this story proliferate, but Marcia Brown’s classic is still one of the best. 
  • (4/5)
    Three soldiers headed towards a town can only think of a good meal and a warm bed to sleep. The villagers, not wanting to share their food supply, cleverly hide it and offer the soldiers no place to sleep when they come by. Not to be discouraged, the soldiers tell the villagers they will make Stone Soup, and it will be enough to feed everyone. All they need are three stones - but it would taste much better with a few carrots… some cabbage… and so on…