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Eve

Eve

Written by Anna Carey

Narrated by Tavia Gilbert


Eve

Written by Anna Carey

Narrated by Tavia Gilbert

ratings:
3.5/5 (123 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Oct 4, 2011
ISBN:
9780062111401
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Where do you go when nowhere is safe?

Sixteen years after a deadly virus wiped out most of Earth’s population, the world is a perilous place. Eighteen-year-old Eve has never been beyond the heavily guarded perimeter of her school, where she and two hundred other orphaned girls have been promised a future as the teachers and artists of the New America. But the night before graduation, Eve learns the shocking truth about her school’s real purpose – and the horrifying fate that awaits her.

Fleeing the only home she’s ever known, Eve sets off on a long, treacherous journey, searching for a place she can survive. Along the way she encounters Arden, her former rival from school, and Caleb, a rough, rebellious boy living in the wild. Separated from men her whole life, Eve has been taught to fear them, but Caleb slowly wins her trust... and her heart. He promises to protect her, but when soldiers begin hunting them, Eve must choose between true love and her life.

In this epic new series, Anna Carey imagines a future that is both beautiful and terrifying. Readers will revel in Eve’s timeless story of forbidden love and extraordinary adventure.

A HarperAudio production.

Publisher:
Released:
Oct 4, 2011
ISBN:
9780062111401
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Anna Carey graduated from New York University and has an MFA in fiction from Brooklyn College. She lives in Los Angeles.


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Reviews

What people think about Eve

3.6
123 ratings / 83 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    I ended up really enjoying this book. It had me interested from the first page and kept me engaged until the end. Set in 2032, girls are being used as breeding sows to replace the population that has been decimated by the plague, which was a fascinating premise. It took me a while to warm to Eve, but I liked Caleb from the beginning, although at first I didn't trust him, and I enjoyed the development of their relationship. The book ended with a cliff-hanger, so I'm glad I don't have to wait for the sequel. I have the next two books ready and waiting. This book will appeal to lovers of good YA dystopian reads.
  • (3/5)
    Eve is a post apocalyptic story that promises to engage readers but I wasn’t impressed by it at all. The plot was extremely predictable and contained vague references to THE PLAGUE, without ever mentioning what it was or how it was able to kill 98% of the population. There are bodies in cars - where people died while trying to get out of cities. This wouldn’t happen if disease killed them, it sounds more like poisonous gas or a nuclear detonation. Moreover, it is never clear whether other countries were affected by it, or whether American citizens are being subjected to their own person hell. I can’t decide whether to like Eve or not. On one hand she has been lied to her whole life and suddenly everything has changed and she’s fleeing for her life, but on the other hand, she desperately clings to the lies she’s been told and acts as if she knows what’s best, even though she’s in a completely alien environment. She behaves irrationally and her stupidity astounds me at times. But I also felt sorry for her and think she cares deeply for those around her. The insta-love with Caleb was frustrating and I feel he lacked substance - he wasn’t written as a man, but as fairy tale version of a hero that women want men to be. It made him unrealistic and two-dimensional when he had some potential.While Eve is a good story, and if you’re interested in it I think it’s worth a read, there are plenty of superior post-apocalyptic stories available and it wouldn’t be high on my list of recommendations. I’ll probably read Once when it’s available, if only to see what happens to Eve.You can read more of my reviews at Speculating on SpecFic.
  • (4/5)
    Really good.
  • (3/5)
    This was a quick read and I'm glad for that. while it wasn't the most miserable book (if it was i wouldn't have finished it) it wasn't a book I would recommend, unless it happens to be there, and free. I'm glad I only spent a couple dollars on it, as the weak plot line wasn't worth it. At one point I found myself asking why I was reading this book, but I was far enough that I just finished it. The heart of the plot line is a female character that had been lied to her whole life, finds out, runs away, bemoans how pathetic she is, falls in love (zero to 60 style) falls out of love over a misunderstanding, separates from love, falls back in love and then finds love again, all the while still bemoaning how pathetic she is with slight undertones of a dystopian society. If your looking for more than a YA romance novel, look somewhere else.
  • (4/5)
    I did get really hooked on this one and it definitely stuck with me through the trilogy. It was an interesting take on a dystopian post-plague world. I kept wanting things to be easy for Eve- I wanted there to actually be a trade school, I wanted for her to be able to settle down, I wanted for things to work. The twists led her to Caleb, however, who I very much liked.
  • (5/5)
    Eve is the top student at a dystopian school that holds young women who have survived a catastrophic plague that killed most people in the United States. The night before her graduation ceremony she learns all of the girls at the school will only be kept prisoner in a birthing facility to repopulate the country. One of the teachers helps her escape and sends her into the "wild" full of starvation, brutality, and danger. Luckily, she finds her classmate Arden who takes on the journey with her to a land called Califia that is safe from the King's rule. Along the way she meets Caleb, her love interest. I loved this series! I am a very slow reader but I couldn't put it down and it only took a few days to get through (at least 100 pages a day). I couldn't wait to read the rest of the series - Once and Rise. Definitely worth a read if you enjoy YA and dystopian literature.
  • (4/5)
    After realizing that I somehow managed never to actually write a review for Eve, I rushed to borrow a copy from the library. Having the sequel, Once, in front of me reminded me that I had a blurry remembrance of events past. I think it's important to let you know that, as a re-read, I had certain biases already. Still, I made sure to clear my mind and just sit down to enjoy a good story. It was time to get lost in a book.

    My first impression of the book was, once again, really great. I found myself trapped inside Eve's world. A world of oppression. A stifling world, that is built on a basis of lies and deceit. Even before I reached the climax that I knew was coming, I had already fallen for the world that Anna Carey built for her readers. It's hard not to forgive Eve for the way she acts when you see how she was raised. Eve's society brainwashes women into mindless drones. It's terrifying and fascinating all at the same time.

    That being said, I was able to feel for Eve a lot more this read through. It's true that she can be selfish, quite often in fact. Remembering her background helped me step past that and enjoy the rest of the story. It's Caleb who really made me fall in love though. Here is a boy that, despite everything else in his world, wants to help a stranger. I'll admit I swooned a bit. After all, who wouldn't fall in love with a guy who is willing to put his life on the line for you? His story, and the stories of the boys he protects, are what really kept me reading on.

    The ending broke my heart in two, even though I knew it was coming. If you haven't had a chance to read Eve yet, you should know that there is a heart wrenching cliffhanger. It will make you come back. I promise. So, at the end of the day I actually liked Eve a lot more this time around! Enough to warrant it a whole extra star. Fans of dystopian fiction will fall in love with Anna Carey's new world, and the heart of the story will keep you coming back for more.
  • (3/5)
    First let me say I went into this with an open mind. I read the reviews, but didn't let them cloud my judgment of the book. And, honestly, Eve wasn't that bad. Ms. Carey is a talented writer, especially in her use of sensory description. She is also good at writing emotional scenes; one in particular, toward the end, almost had me in tears The boys, "I love you, I love you." *sigh* I enjoyed her style and thought the idea was interesting. I read the book in one sitting; it was a quick read.

    That said, I did NOT like the main character, Eve. She was one of those TSTL (too stupid to live) characters. I rolled my eyes and sighed at almost every move she made. And, just when I thought she was making progress/wising up, she would make another idiotic move The code at Marjorie's house to name one.



    It boils down to good and bad.

    The Good
    *Arden - She was the most interesting character. The others seemed bland and/or like caricatures of people.
    *Ms. Carey is excellent at writing description. 'Thick blankets of flowers, their blooms no more than a few inches wide.' or 'lungs caked with dirt.' Those were just a couple that I liked.
    *M & O Marjorie & Otis - I almost cried. For real.

    The Bad
    *Eve is a HORRIBLE friend, I was appalled at the first thing she did leaving Pip & Ruby at school when she knows about the 'sows'. I was pissed.. Even though she kind of made up for it with Arden, she still let Arden take the heat from the guards. Ugh....
    *For someone taught that men were bad (m'kay), Eve latched onto Caleb very quickly. It felt almost forced. I know I would have been extremely wary of men if I'd been taught, for 13 years no less, that men were evil, couldn't be trusted, etc. etc.
    *Eve has no worries about others. People tell her its dangerous people are looking for her specifically & they can be killed for hiding her yet she still does pretty much what she wants. Talk about impulse issues! She just lets people die/get hurt/cover her ass without even thinking about them.

    The bad is mainly because of the main character. She was impulsive, self centered, silly, and ignorant. Now, ignorance isn't necessarily a bad thing, if you learn from it, but she just kept on making the same silly mistakes and not taking other people's lives into account.

    Overall, though, the book wasn't terrible. Make Arden the main female character and it might even be good. I plan to read the next one because I want to see if Eve gets any smarter. I have my fingers crossed. I think Ms. Carey is a talented writer and it would behoove her to have a better main character.
  • (3/5)
    This review is posted on Reading with AngelaRenea!

    I have been eyeing this book up in Books-A-Million for over a year now, and I finally read it! I have to say it was not what I expected, but it was still really good.

    This book is a dystopian young adult book with a love story incorporated into it, so while this is a very unique dystopian young adult book with a love story, it is still a snowflake in a blizzard, which unfortunately means, that not a whole lot of this book really stuck with me. That being said, I will be continuing this book because I think there is a lot of potential in this series.

    This book follows Eve, a young girl who escapes from her 'school' where she learns they are preparing girls to be baby machines, and teaching them to fear and hate men. I think that that is a really interesting idea, that has some really great ties to today's society.

    I really enjoyed the fact that Eve was not a special little flower who everyone loves and dotes on at all times, but is also not a hard core Katness Everdeen type character who kicks some butt, and scares everyone, while being emotionally unavailable. I found her very realistic, and it actually really broke the mold in that respect.

    Ultimately, however, it did read like any number of first books in post apocalyptic dystopian worlds. Luckily the second books are always the best!
  • (2/5)
    This review originally posted at Christa's Hooked on BooksThis book was described as The Hunger Games meets The Handmaid's Tale which gave me high hopes, as those are two of my favourite books. And for the most part I did find the premise of this book intriguing. The best way I can think to describe it is, The Handmaid's Tale out in the wild. Books like this really make me question what would actually happen if most of the population was wiped out. What would the attitude be towards re-population? Eve does an excellent job of raising some key questions and made me stop and consider the rights and responsibilities of women in such a scenario. What would happen to our freedom? (Heavy stuff I know).Premise aside, however, I was a little unimpressed with some of the other elements of the novel. For one thing the pacing just didn't seem right. Everything happened too fast, and not in an "edge of your seat" kind of way. There wasn't enough time in between major events to really digest them and really have the characters react to them. Sometimes the reaction to a scene is just as important as the scene itself and I felt like I was missing out on that. In addition to the pacing I also found the ending a little off. I just don't buy the way things happened, it wasn't rational! I'm dying to talk to someone about it (maybe they have a different take on it than me) so if you've read Eve and want to talk about it then please contact me!! Bring on the book discussion!!This book is the first in a planned trilogy, and I intend to check out the sequel because, as I mentioned the premise interests me. So who knows maybe the kinks will be worked out in the coming books. I sincerely hope so. Otherwise since there are so many other similar books, Eve might just fall through the cracks. I'm not willing to write off this series completely just yet and sometimes I just need to look at a book in a different way to really appreciate it. So if you have a different take on Eve please share!
  • (4/5)
    3.5 stars
    Eve is about to graduate as the Valedictorian at her school for girls where she has been since her mother died of plague when she was 5. She is excited about graduating and going on to learn a profession and because she has heard that The King himself is coming to their graduation ceremony, which is a first. When she comes across Arden, a loner, who is escaping she is told of what their true fate is. At first she is highly skeptical, but Eve confirms this, she is helped to escape by one of her teachers who comes across her trying to leave hours later, and eventually the girls meet up while on the run.

    Yes, this is another dystopian novel, but it is better than some of the others I've read this year, and certainly more if it is plausible than in many, including the plague that wiped out a vast majority of the population of the world. I'm rounding it up to a 4, partly because I liked the sequel better. A good start for a new author.
  • (3/5)
    Another dystopia world for young adults to read. Boring. Let's take a look:Pros of this read: A slightly different take on things ... imagine spending your whole life within a school building and not venturing out? Only spending time with other girls? Lies were told and one girl, Eve, escapes. Keeps your interest throughout the book.Cons: It's another dystopia read. Isn't there some other topic for young adults to read about? No major plot line ... just escaping a school, finding friendship, running from the bad guy, falling in love.It is a great read and a fast one. Definitely entertaining. But, let's come up with a different story line.
  • (3/5)
    Damn. I finally finished it. It took me six days to read it since I don't read it continuously. And I don't know what to think yet.

    I don't really like the way or the reason for the Schools. I find it repulsive but then again, I guess if it's how the world would be, it's acceptable. For the story I mean. I don't really find it acceptable now. Or in the next days. It just isn't right even if the purpose is for greater good.

    What I like about this book is the main character herself, Eve. I like her for not being a whiny female protagonist, I like how she pick up herself and try to tend herself on her own. I like how she taught them to read. How she care about her friends.

    I read in a review that why do the author have to build up the story about the school. Why educate the girls and all that stuffs they do in the school if the girls would be like THAT. Just make them like animals who needed to be breed.

    I get it now. The School is trying to gain the girls' trusts. They need that in order to do whatever the hell they want without too many complications. It's more easy to educate them, try to gain their trusts, give them medicines, 'care' for them.

    Sooo anyway, that's how I see it and I did enjoy some parts of the book. It is good. :)
  • (4/5)
    I picked this book up on Wednesday and started reading it Friday morning, I couldn't put it down! I'd have to say I was a bit irked that the author portrayed Eve in such a way at the beginning that she went from believing everything the "establishment" (thats my word not the authors) told her to then doing a 180 all in the matter of about 10 pages. However after that the story got much better and I look forward to the next book in the series to find out what happens.
  • (2/5)
    This book is not offensive as much as it is boring and predictable. Typical dystopian romance of a "New America" but in this one after the plague has wiped out everyone, the orphans are sent away. The girls to a truly splendid school where they are taught great literature, how to dance, how to play the piano, etc. (and also informed constantly that men are evil) while the boys are sent to labor camps. Once they graduate, the girls are sent to a center where their main purpose in life seems to be to have children and repopulate the United States. Eve is the valedictorian who escapes from her school the night before graduation along with Arden another girl who had figured out the truth way before Eve did. They are rescued by Caleb who along with a group of boys have gone into hiding in a series of caves. Love blooms between Eve and Caleb leading to jealousy with Leif--the "leader" of the boys. When it is found out that Eve is actually wanted by the King to be his "breeder" things start to get complicated. There are TONS of unanswered questions in here. We know the plague wiped out many people, but why did so many children survive when adults did not? What happens to the children whose parents did survive (such as Otis and Margaret)? Why do the girls get such a great education only to be turned into sows? Why is Eve wanted by the King? Perhaps this is one those series where there will be a "prequel" written later. That's fine but I won't bother with it--you have lost my interest.
  • (4/5)
    Eve (the first in the Eve trilogy) is a dystopian book which introduces you to a young female character who faces a world of lies and deception. I could easily relate to her and found myself reading this book in two days (I'm seriously slow at reading... two days is a good thing).

    I liked this book so much I purchased the next two books in the Eve trilogy automatically.
  • (3/5)
    This book was on special at audible.com as first in a series, so I thought that I'd try this sci-fi novel. It is a very feminine book; I suppose that it was something that a female would do, but upon reflection, I d did not like it very much and don't believe that I'll go back for volume 2.
  • (3/5)
    It was ok I think I expected more.
  • (3/5)
    Eve is a post apocalyptic or dystopian themed YA novel that takes place in a not too distant future America devastated by a plague that has killed a large part of the population. In their desperate attempt to rebuild, the powers that be make some drastic changes and enact some rather heartless policies.

    Eve was full of action and suspense and I was sucked into the story very quickly, from the first chapter. There were many exciting plot twists that I wasn’t expecting and Anne Carey was none too gentle with her characters. There were a few times that I thought that events happened a little too coincidentally but it was easy to overlook those small instances when the story itself was so entertaining. I finished this in just one day, this was definitely a book I couldn’t put down once I started it.

    The world that Eve inhabits is a fascinating place, however, it certainly pushed the boundary of believability in some areas. There were a lot of details mentioned but left unexplained regarding the hows and whys of this world. It raised quite a few questions for me as I was reading and I thought several times that there will be some readers who will dislike being expected to just take all of these things at face value. I honestly would have liked more explanation as to why it was so important, for instance, that the two sexes be kept strictly apart, what was being done with the children from the breeding programs, and how was nobody in this society having an issue with orphan children being forced to work in labor camps, among many other unanswered questions. I hope that some of these issues are addressed in future novels.

    The characters were one of the strongest aspects of Eve. Eve herself wasn’t always a very likable character. But this made sense considering the absurd ideas that she was basically brainwashed to believe since she was five years old. I thought that in many ways, Eve reminded me of a typical teenager, often making stupidly impulsive decisions that she later regretted. However, in this society, these impulsive decisions sometimes had deadly consequences. The author was none too gentle with her characters and none of them made it through the book unscathed.

    The relationships between the characters were emotionally charged and believable. I loved the dynamic between Eve and many of the secondary characters, especially the boys Silas and Benny. It was almost a “Wendy meets the Lost Boys” kind of situation, with the boys so desperately needing a mother figure. I hope I see more of them in future installments. The romance between Eve and Caleb as well as the friendship between Eve and Arden was flawed, interesting, and seemed very authentic. Each of the characters were allowed to grow and change a little as the story progressed. None so much as Eve, who slowly grew from a naïve schoolgirl to a tough and much wiser young woman. This made sense considering some of the harsh lessons she was forced to learn from her mistakes.

    Overall, I thought that Eve was a thrilling dystopian that, even with its flaws, was an exciting read. Again, the characterization was where Eve excelled. The writing, pacing, and plot were also very well done. However, I’m only rating it a 3 because of the holes in the world building and because of the awful ending. I will definitely be picking up the second book in this series because, even though there were some flaws and it ended badly, I really enjoyed reading Eve and would recommend it to any fans of YA dystopian or post apocalyptic books.
  • (2/5)
    The premise of Eve is interesting enough: after a plague wiped out the majority of the population, the world is struggling to rebuild. Orphaned boys and girls are sent to segregated schools, and after graduation are either sent to labour camps (for the boys) or to hospital beds in order to bear children and help repopulate the Earth (for the girls). While the idea of a woman’s worth being tied to her ability to reproduce isn’t unique when it comes to dystopian novels (see: Wither, The Handmaid’s Tale), it is certainly interesting (and disturbing) enough to create a compelling story… right? Unfortunately, when it comes to this story, the answer to that question is no.

    One of the many issues that I had with Eve was the world building or, in this case, the lack thereof. We have this plague that wiped out 98% of the world’s population – and that’s all we’re told about it. Sure, we’re given a few descriptions of affected humans, but as to how/where/why the plague started, your guess is as good as mine. Then we have the issue of repopulating the planet. If the goal is to reproduce as quickly as possible, why are they relying solely on 18 year old orphan girls instead of the adults who are living in the city? Also, why would they go to all of the trouble (and cost) of educating these girls for 10+ years in subjects that include classic literature and waltzing when this schooling will never be used? This world just made no logical sense, and seemed to serve only to create a tragic back story and a sense of betrayal since those are always necessary.

    And then we have Eve. She’s constantly mentioning that she’s the valedictorian of her School and that she’s smart, but we never actually get to see any proof of that; for the entire book, she comes across as naive, easily swayed, selfish, and unlikeable. At first, I was willing to accept her naivety – after all, she had been sheltered and given a false perception of the world – but that was no excuse for her lack of common sense. Within the first 70 pages, she sees a bear cub, decides that it must be like Winnie the Pooh and pets it, not realizing that it’s dangerous and that there’s probably an angry mama bear somewhere nearby. After that experience, you’d expect her to become a bit smarter, right? Unfortunately, it’s safe to say that petting a wild bear cub was one of her better choices, as it neither resulted in death, injury or abandonment – all of which Eve manages to inflict upon her friends with her poor decisions.

    The romance aspect of the plot was where I completely lost interest. I didn’t mind Eve’s love interest, Caleb, who lived underground with a group of runaway orphan boys in a setup that reminded me a lot of Neverland. I did mind how easily Eve managed to fall in love with him, especially after being taught throughout her entire time at school that you should never trust men because they are horrible savages who only want to rape you. Not to mention that when Caleb rides away with her on horseback after saving her from a bear, Eve is offended when he says that she’s not his type – and that’s a mere day after escaping from School. There’s just no way that her entire belief system could be rewritten in such a short period of time.

    On a positive note, Carey’s writing style is fluid and filled with some beautiful quotes. The plot is well-paced and there are enough twists and turns to keep your attention throughout the quick read. The secondary characters were interesting and generally likeable – especially Arden, who would have made an excellent protagonist.

    Overall, Eve did not live up to my expectations. With some more detail about the world and a larger role for the supporting characters, the remaining books in this series may prove to be more enjoyable.
  • (5/5)
    I read this right after reading Nomansland by Lesley Hauge so at first I was struck by the similarities.
  • (3/5)
    I would have to put Eve by Anna Carey in my..I enjoyed it but not overly wowed...category. I really like the overall concept of the story. Having a plague ravage the world leaving few survivors that have to rebuild society. It's not something we haven't ever heard before but everyone puts their own twist on it.



    It was an easy lighter read for me, which is not a bad thing. I could tell that this was the first book in a series because there were many questions left unanswered. I couldn't say the ending left me hanging from a cliff and salvating for the next installment but I did enjoy it.



    I noticed some familar themes....Eve herself has a little Wendy from "Peter Pan" going for her, with the exception of having to fight of sexual advances. This of course is no Neverland though with the wild strays having a bit of "Lord of the Flies" going for them.



    The romance was cute not epic but I did believe the chemistry of the characters.



    I will probably read the second book because I feel an authors writing grows just as much as their characters do. So I'm curious as to how some of the issues will be worked out and how some questions will be answered. I wouldn't run up to you on the street and say you have got to read this book.
  • (1/5)
    Man. Oh Man. I was so ANGRY at this book by the time I finished it. Just...ugh. It starts off slow and then builds into a massive trainwreck. The heroine, Eve, makes one bad decision after another after another, gets everyone around her into horrible trouble, says she's sorry, and then does it again. She's supposed to be a real smart girl but you wouldn't know it from the way she acts in EVE.

    So we've got a dystopian novel in which earth's population has been wiped out by a horrible plague and efforts to re-build and re-organize are still in their early stages. The plague orphaned Eve and a lot of other kids, who are placed in sex-segregated Schools. Here's the first weird thing: Eve gets some pretty fancy schooling. Like, most private schools currently operating right now in the US aren't this fancy - she learns to waltz and play the piano and she's always yammering on about the books she reads, like Anna Karenina and The Great Gatsby and To The Lighthouse. Fancy, right? Yet, for some reason, this very elaborate education is dished out to the orphan girls...so that they can be tied down in hospital beds and forced to bear litters of children for the rest of their lives. It turns out all the orphan girls are "sows" whose sole function in life is to repopulate the earth as quickly as possible.

    Now. I could buy some very basic schooling to keep the kids docile until they're of childbearing age. But I can't buy this really elaborate, intensive schooling that lasts all the way until they're 18 (well into those precious peak childbearing years), not when none of the schooling will ever be put to use. It makes no sense. I'm guessing the author was more interested in evoking the hip, dystopian shock of betrayal that Eve feels when she discovers the truth than actually creating a world that makes any logical sense.

    And that's just the beginning. Like I said, it gets worse and worse. So next we find out that Eve has been selected to be the King of New America's broodmare. We don't find out what this entails; a special hospital bed? A life of luxury? Eve doesn't care - she is dead set against it no matter what! So suddenly that's our conflict. Once Eve escapes from school, the surprisingly extensive military apparatus of this destroyed, resource-starved country is mobilized to hunt for her, because even though she's a random orphan who's never met the King, she's THE ONE and he will STOP AT NOTHING to find her!

    How does this make sense? If the whole point of the orphans and their Schools is how disposable they are, how they're treated like slaves (slaves who read Tolstoy!), it makes no sense for the King to waste resources searching for uppity little Eve.

    I could go on. The world makes no sense. Neither does the story. And neither do the characters. Eve somehow manages to become MORE naive as the book goes on. When she meets Caleb, the handsome boy-hero, she's pretty wary of him. Things happen, lots of them bad, like assault and betrayal and attempted rape. These experiences lead Eve to reflect on how horrible and untrustworthy people can be, on how cynical she's become...and then she sees a lit window in the wilderness and runs right toward it, totally convinced that she will find a nice person inside to save her from her troubles. If I could have reached into the novel and slapped her, I would have.

    Seriously people. Give this novel a pass. It may be chock-full of literary references (the school for slaves also teaches James Joyce, can you believe it?) but that doesn't make up for the author's lack of actual writing chops.
  • (3/5)
    Undoubtedly, the most terrifying dystopias for me personally are the ones that involve the role of women in society after a calamity. Eve falls in with the like of Wither, The Handmaid's Tale, and Bumped. If reproductivity suffers, if a large segment of the population dies in some horrific event, if people are dying off younger, then women quickly lose the status they fought for decades to accomplish and become property, needed only to push out babies.

    This subset of dystopias is terrifying largely because it requires very little suspension of disbelief to imagine such things coming to pass should something catastrophic occur. For all that women are much more equal now, I have no doubt that our position would not revert back to slavery and breeding chattel swiftly if that was viewed as the only way to save mankind from extinction. What's worse is that on some level, that response does make sense. What if that really was the only way for mankind to survive? I like to think there would be other ways, but what if there weren't? Is it worth it?

    In Eve, the population was decimated by a plague. Many perished, including Eve's mother. Orphans, of which there were many, were gathered up and put into schools and educated until they were old enough to be of use one way or another. In Eve's school, she and her classmates are taught about the evil ways of men, of how they only want one thing and of the dangers of falling in love. They teach these lessons with examples from literature, such as Romeo and Juliet and Anna Karenina.

    For the most part, this was a really interesting read, although I did find my attention waning as I got further into the story. There was a lot of running around and not a lot of plot advancement. One weird thing was a scene where Eve mentioned that she didn't remember the date of her birthday, although she did remember her mom singing a birthday song to her. Eve was young when the plague hit and she went into the school, where birthdays were not celebrated, but what kid does not remember their birthday? I mean, come on. If she was old enough at the time to have such clear memories of her mom, then she would totally remember when her birthday was.

    All in all, a decent dystopian read and a chilling view of how quickly the status of women could fall. I sure hope nothing like this comes to pass.
  • (2/5)
    The huge mistake Eve makes near the end caused me to completely lose my sympathy for the character.
  • (3/5)
    I requested Eve by Anna Carey because I'm addicted to Dystopian right now. It's gritty and realistic and as a fan of series like Delirium, The Hunger Games and Divergent, I was eager to get my hands on this hot little ARC.
    Eve has a good recipe for success: it's post-apocalypse(ish), taking place after a great plague has wiped a lot of man-kind from the planet. It showcases a supposedly Utopian government and believable world-building. The premise of the "after" (post-plague) is quite believable as well: orphaned children are taken to segregated schools, taught to read, write, and learn the arts before supposedly being sent off to the new City of Sand the King has built in the desert. I don't want to say much more than that, because what really happens is a key plot point.
    But in the end I was a little disappointed. As much as I liked the main character, I also didn't like her. She was whiny and predictable...and weak. I think in a Dystopian world, your main character needs to be strong. Now, maybe she's weak in this first novel of the series so the author can grow her in the sequels, but who knows? Right now, the genre is saturated, so without this key element, I have mixed emotions about it. I was also confused at some of Eve's actions; they seemed out of character for her and that made it a little unbelievable. Why would Eve believe this fellow schoolmate she despises when that schoolmate tells her what the school is really for and then breaks out? Why on earth would Eve, the consummate good girl and model student, follow her?
    {{{SPOILER ALERT!}}}I also didn't like how she arrives at this camp and falls into the role of a teacher to a bunch of orphan boys. It felt too convenient. And the boys didn't act like any young boys I know. I didn't expect these kids to be savages, but it was not how I would imagine a bunch of rebel boys to act. I was also expecting a love triangle, because I think a relationship could have been developed between Eve and another central character and...well we don't get that at all. We get violence instead and it's left rather open-ended. It's hard for me to describe exactly what actually happens, so unfortunately, I'll have to leave it at that. {{{/SPOILER ALERT}}} The ending was also a bit unsatisfactory, but I'll probably read the next just to find out what happens.
    There were a lot of strong characters (just not the characters I think need to be strong), and the story is conceptually awesome. This is not The Hunger Games or Divergent, and I think part of my problem with Eve is that I went into it expecting something just as stupendous. But in the end, this is a good read, especially if you are a fan of novels such as Possession or Matched.
  • (4/5)
    Postapocalyptic. Eve is the valedictorian at a training school for girls. She is about to graduate but finds out that what she thinks she and the other gilrs are being prepared for is not what is the reality. 
  • (3/5)
    Review courtesy of Dark Faerie TalesQuick & Dirty: Eve has an interesting premise but falls short in the execution with its paragon-love-interest and convenient plot problem. Opening Sentence: By the time the sun set over the fifty-foot perimeter wall, the School yard was covered with twelfth year students. The Review: So I made the mistake of asking other reviewers about Eve before I picked it up — and there are some seriously mixed reviews out there. Personally, I didn’t see the novel as misogynistic but a lot of others did. The orphans left by the virus are sent to Schools, separate ones for girls and boys, and it’s at Eve’s school I think most of their problems lie. The School is a lot more like a finishing school from the Victorian Era, but we know the valedictorian the previous year wanted to become a doctor — it’s not that their getting no education because they’re women, it’s that they’re getting a different kind. Which is entirely the point. When Eve learns her School isn’t the haven of safety and scholarship she was raised to believe, she flees the night of her graduation. I was very surprised she found it so easy to abandon the other girls in the School to their fates, but that was the smallest of plot holes I found. Turns out, almost everything Eve’s been told at School is a lie. But there’s a place on the coast called Califia, where she’ll be protected from Schools and the King — if she can survive the journey there. Eve’s character is the mothering-type — probably another reason people found Eve misogynistic. She’s used to being responsible, to taking care of people, which is something of a hindrance in the dog-eat-dog world outside. I mentioned there were some plot holes in Eve, and this is where one crops up. For someone who’s been raised on horror stories about men and what they’ll do to women, Eve seems to trust Caleb pretty fast. I felt like even if you realize your School was lying to you about your future, 10 years of psychological manipulation can’t just be willed away. Caleb and our other secondary characters are still in desperate need of fleshing out. Caleb is a swoony paragon of wilderness survival who will do anything for our heroine. I liked him, he was perfect, but almost too perfect. I loved reading about him, don’t get me wrong, but I definitely questioned the reality of his situation as well as his friends’. They made everything go very conveniently for Eve, gently moving along the plot and guiding her way to the next step. I can’t imagine it would ever be so easy. (But then, this is not a long book.) The writing was solid, but I wish Carey had delved deeper into the characters — especially since we don’t get a lot of worldbuilding. Eve is stranded outside civilization and as such, we have very little idea of what’s going on in King’s City. I’m hoping in Once, which partially takes place in the city, will help ground the story in a setting and bring us characters we can really invest in. Notable Scene: The gang came closer. I kept at the lock, pulling and hitting it with my palm, hoping it would break. Please open, I begged, please. I glanced around the corner of the shack again and saw the men beneath the gas station awning. They huddled around the deer. One hacked at the animal, cutting its coat away like a person skinning fruit. It bucked and twisted. It was still alive. I tugged on the door, suddenly wishing Headmistress would barrel down the broken road and the guards would pull me onto the bed of a government Jeep. We would go back the way I’d come, the men shooting at us, until they were tiny black dots on the horizon. Until I was safe. But my fantasy evaporated, like fog burned off by the sun. Headmistress wasn’t my protector, and School was no longer safe. Nowhere was safe.FTC Advisory: HarperTeen provided me with a copy of Eve. No goody bags, sponsorships, “material connections,” or bribes were exchanged for my review.
  • (2/5)
    Eve is one of those books that everyone has mentioned at one time or another in the YA world, so I knew I had to take a look.Eve by Anna Carey is a post apocalyptic dystopian YA novel-- unsurprisingly about a girl named Eve. She is brought up in a School where she is taught to hate boys, but quickly, finds out that nothing is what it seems. After a disturbing discovery, she runs away, and meets a boy named Caleb, who lives in a mountain with a bunch of other boys. From there, she realizes what she has been taught is not entirely true and that she has a lot to learn about life and love.Eve seems like a very stereotypical dystopian YA to me. We have a female protagonist that is very innocent and gullible, who is thrust into a dangerous world. While the story itself is straightforward, I couldn't really get into it because Eve is not a very compelling character. She keeps making obvious and terrible mistakes, and then quickly becomes completely besotted with Caleb, which makes me prefer the old Eve who thought all men were awful. There is maybe one plot twist if I'm being generous, and I quickly skimmed through the last 25% of the book just to see what would happen. Not much. Overall, a disappointing addition to the dystopian genre. Nothing very surprising about this book.
  • (3/5)
    I'm not sure why everyone seems to hate Eve as a character because I really liked her. She's probably not the most favorable character because in a sense she's really stupid and makes poor decisions a normal, educated person wouldn't (and she's supposed to be really intelligent) BUT you have to consider her world and the fact that she is essentially brain-washed by the society (School) she lives in. It's not like she's just going to have a complete personality reversal the first second she steps outside and just automatically disregard everything drilled into her head for twelve years. It can make her annoying if you don't think in her shoes.As far as dystopian realities go, this one is...interesting. It'll make you cringe, that's for sure. It's not the type of world that would even make sense to me, but then most dystopian worlds are screwed up in some major way or we wouldn't have all the books that try to bring them down. Still, since we pretty much only know about the plague that essentially killed everyone, the Schools, the orphan camps for boys and the City of Sand with the King, I am left wanting more details on the rest of the world. Caleb was an awesome character. Actually, all the boys in the group were really awesome, and it was nice to see how Eve started to grow around them and rethink some of those ideals forced on her. Leif wasn't a cool guy, but his character was solid and how he reacts is helpful to Eve with her confusion over the whole "dangers of boys and men" thing.The romance was essentially instant, but then it really was a "save the damsel in distress" situation in which she obviously falls madly in love with her savior. Cheesy, right? I don't think it's love, mostly because she doesn't really understand the concept of love (none of them do). It seems more like gratitude and she rely's on him for safety since he's the first guy that keeps her safe. After all, she hates Arden at school but then when she becomes her only means of survival, she becomes Eve's absolute favorite person in the world! It doesn't have the greatest plot in the world. It really is just "reach Califia any way possible" so things are...random. It seems more like the whole book is bent on character development for Eve, but it kept me interested anyway since it all did work well together...somehow. The writing style wasn't complex, but it kept things moving and you can get a good picture in your head of everything. I really liked the book, for all that it's different, and I'm looking forward to reading the next one.