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Savage Season: The First Hap and Leonard Novel

Savage Season: The First Hap and Leonard Novel

Written by Joe R. Lansdale

Narrated by Phil Gigante


Savage Season: The First Hap and Leonard Novel

Written by Joe R. Lansdale

Narrated by Phil Gigante

ratings:
4/5 (19 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Released:
Jan 13, 2009
ISBN:
9781423383888
Format:
Audiobook

Description

A rip-roaring, high-octane, Texas-sized thriller, featuring two friends, one vixen, a crew of washed-up radicals, loads of money, and bloody mayhem.

Hap Collins and Leonard Pine are best friends, yet they couldn't be more different. Hap is an East Texas white boy with a weakness for Texas women. Leonard is a black, gay Vietnam vet. Together, they stir up more commotion than a fire storm. But that's just the way they like it. So when as ex-flame of Hap's returns promising a huge score, Hap lets Leonard in on the scam, and that's when things get interesting. Chockful of action and laughs, Savage Season is the masterpiece of dark suspense that introduced Hap and Leonard to the thriller scene. It hasn't been the same since.

"The most consistently original and originally visceral writer the great state of Texas (or any other state for that matter) has seen in a score of flashpoint summers." - The Austin Chronicle

"Lansdale has an unsettling sensibility. Be thankful he crafts such wild tall tales." - Chicago Sun-Times
Released:
Jan 13, 2009
ISBN:
9781423383888
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Joe R. Lansdale is the winner of the British Fantasy Award, the American Horror Award, the Edgar Award, and six Bram Stoker Awards. He lives in Nacogdoches, Texas.

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Reviews

What people think about Savage Season

4.2
19 ratings / 5 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Savage Season, the first novel in Joe Lansdale’s Hap and Leonard series, was first published in 1990. Hap Collins and Leonard Pine are two “good ole boys” from East Texas who have a way of getting themselves into trouble by just trying to mind their own business and occasionally help out friends. Hap is a white heterosexual who has done some prison time and his best friend (Leonard) is a black homosexual who is also a Vietnam Veteran. I’ve previously read two other Hap and Leonard books and I had no trouble enjoying them even though I hadn’t read the previous volumes. However, I decided I wanted to see how it all began, and I am glad I did. Lansdale spends some time filling in the bios of both characters in this story. The background and character development certainly help the reader determine what kind of men these guys are, but the reader learns even more about who they are through their (often humorous) dialogue. The reader also learns what kind of men Hap and Leonard are through their no-nonsense actions. They have both fought their way around the block many times, and there is plenty of action in the second half of this book. Hap is visited by his ex-wife (Trudy), whom he has never been able to resist even though he knows she uses physical pleasures to entice him and abuse him. Leonard doesn’t hesitate to voice his very critical opinions of Trudy to Hap, but it rarely deters Hap’s involvement with her. This time Trudy entices Hap to help her and her motley crew of criminals and idealistic radicals find and recover over $200,000 of stolen money that they believe has been stashed in a car, which has been submerged in the Sabine River for many years. Hap brings Leonard into the caper against Trudy’s wishes, and Leonard finally agrees to join the caper with strong reservations. Hap is mostly convinced because he cannot resist Trudy. Leonard is convinced that it is a really bad idea for both of them, but he can’t abandon Hap. Hey, their share of the money would be nice also! Well, they find the money. However, then greed and betrayal takes control of the situation and the resulting savage violence smacks Hap and Leonard in their faces and pummels their bodies. It seems impossible that either Hap or Leonard will survive. Even though you know they both survive because I’ve already told you this is only the first volume in the series, it will still seem impossible as you read this book. I like Lansdale’s Hap and Leonard series because he creates very interesting characters, writes colorful and humorous dialogue, and weaves engaging stories that convey a unique local East-Texas ambiance and provide plenty of violence and suspense. What more could you want? I recommend that you read more of Lansdale’s Hap and Leonard after this one.
  • (3/5)
    Not so much my genre, but for what it is, it ain't bad.
  • (3/5)
    Black Humor in the Sticks: "Savage Season" by Joe R. Lansdale Published 1990.

    "I didn't want to be anywhere near Trudy right then. I had a hunch she would have harsh words to say about me and Leonard, and I wasn't up to it. I didn't want her to get me near a bed either. She could really talk in bed, and if she talked long enough and moved certain parts of her body just right, I might agree to have Leonard shot at sunset."

    I started reading "Savage Season" while reading Arnaldur Indridason’s "Oblivion”. Why? Because I misplaced it at home on a Friday and I didn’t bother to go looking for it (yes, my office is jam packed with books, and sometimes even books get lost in that jungle). Had it been a better book I'm pretty sure I couldn’t’ve been without it during the weekend. So I read around 100 pages of "Savage Season" before finishing "Oblivion". Already then I knew I would like Lansdale better than Indridason, at least when it comes to writing Crime Fiction (I’m not even sure Lansdale writes it).

    If you're into a good mix of black humour and wonderful one-liners, read on.
  • (4/5)
    Hap and Leonard are two middle-aged guys hanging out in East Texas, when Haps' ex shows up with a scheme that could earn H&L two-hundred grand. Published in 1990, it's a bit dated; but the plot moves quickly, the dialogue between Hap and Leonard is fast and funny; and the scenes are deftly painted. Despite some of the violence, it feels a bit light, like a TV show [which I just became aware of and have not seen] but good as summer fare.
  • (3/5)
    The first Hap and Leonard! I love these characters and the way they interact! Great dialogue, full of truth and humor! The author really brings their friendship into perfect clarity. Now, I've read other Hap and Leonard books, and liked them a bit more, so that's why I'm only giving this 3 stars. To me, the series has improved! But, I did enjoy reading how it all got started!