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Tyrannosaurus Sue: The Extraordinary Saga of the Largest, Most Fought Over T-Rex Ever Found

Tyrannosaurus Sue: The Extraordinary Saga of the Largest, Most Fought Over T-Rex Ever Found

By Steve Fiffer

Narrated by Jim Bond


Tyrannosaurus Sue: The Extraordinary Saga of the Largest, Most Fought Over T-Rex Ever Found

By Steve Fiffer

Narrated by Jim Bond

ratings:
4/5 (7 ratings)
Length:
9 hours
Released:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9781543612554
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In 1990, Peter Larson, with his team of commercial fossil hunters from the Black Hills Institute, discovered the most complete Tyrannosaurus Rex specimen in history. He dubbed it "Sue" after the field paleontologist who first saw it sticking out of a sandstone cliff on the ranch of Maurice Williams, a Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe member in South Dakota's badlands. Because the skelton was 90% complete, its study promised to yield up priceless information on the life and habits of the T Rex. Larson made out a check to Williams for $5,000 to purchase the bones, and planned to make Sue the centerpiece of a museum that he and his brother had dreamed for years of building.

In 1992, however, federal agents raided the Institute and seized Sue, triggering the greatest custody battle in paleontological history. In the end, Sue would be auctioned off to Chicago's Field Museum.

Tyrannosaurus Sue is the definitive insider's look at how this dramatic discovery, and the ensuing legal struggle, played out. Everyone from the Jurrasic Park crowd of dinosaur lovers to those who delight in a well-told, exciting true story will enjoy this audiobook.
Released:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9781543612554
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Steve Fiffer is an author and community activist whose distinguished career includes collaborations with the likes of Dr. Quentin Young, personal doctor to Martin Luther King Jr.; Robert Jordan, former ambassador to Saudi Arabia; and James A. Baker, former U.S. secretary of state. He is the co-author of Jimmie Lee and James: Two Lives, Two Deaths, and the Movement that Changed America, a Harlem Book Fair nonfiction finalist. He is also the co-writer of Southern Poverty Law Center co-founder Morris Dees’s two award-winning memoirs A Season for Justice and Hate on Trial. Fiffer lives today in Evanston, Illinois, with his wife Sharon, a novelist. He currently serves on the advisory board of the Civic Leadership Foundation in Chicago, a nonprofit that serves underprivileged youth.

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What people think about Tyrannosaurus Sue

4.0
7 ratings / 3 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    An entertaining tale about Sue and her history. This book delves into the paleontology's origins and more distant past as well as the specific struggles regarding Sue. This context was entertaining and enlightening. Keeping all the players and the timing for this story straight was a bit difficult and I think it could have used a timeline and a "cast of characters" to help keep things straightforward. Another improvement would be to have waited until Sue was actually on display in the Field museum to publish the book - I was shocked to get to the end of the book and realize it was speaking in future tense about Sue's unveiling. Given that it was only supposed to be a few months away, what was the rush? (I imagine the author and/or publisher wanted the book out in time to be bought during the publicity surrounding her unveiling, or perhaps this was even published in conjunction with it, but either way - it felt off to me.)Altogether, though, this is an enjoyable book about an interesting subject.
  • (3/5)
    The book tells the story of Sue, from unearthing, preparing, and through the legal battle that determined her ownership. The book got off to a slow start. It felt like a science text with too much information and too little story. Throughout the book, the author told historical stories of famous paleontologists, like Marsh and Andrews. Although the stories are interesting, they are not new to people familiar with the histories, and only lied loosely to the main plot. I felt they were more filler than information. About half-way through the book, it improved. This started with the seizure of the fossils. Leading into the court case, the book improved as it detailed the different positions and justifications for actions and ownership, although many seemed only motivated by profit. Even outside of the scope of the court case, many paleontologists, and even the SVP (The Society for Vertebrate Paleontology) voiced in with their opinions. The government was portrayed mostly in a poor light. They seized Sue, yet never used her in the actual case. One felt they were attacking Larson more to make an example of him than a just pursuit of a criminal. The reader feels his is guilty, but his actions were reasonable and justified. He didn't deserve any prison time.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great example of the folly principle as explained by Barbara Tuchman, that I have found. Our government proves once again that they can't let go when they taek the wrong tack on something.