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The Scandalous Gospel of Jesus: What's So Good About the Good News?

The Scandalous Gospel of Jesus: What's So Good About the Good News?

Written by Peter J. Gomes

Narrated by Patrick Lawlor


The Scandalous Gospel of Jesus: What's So Good About the Good News?

Written by Peter J. Gomes

Narrated by Patrick Lawlor

ratings:
4/5 (7 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Nov 15, 2007
ISBN:
9781400174997
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

New York Times bestselling author and renowned Harvard preacher Peter J. Gomes takes on the hot-button issues in the world today by returning to Jesus's message.



"What did Jesus preach?" asks the esteemed Harvard pastor, who believes that excessive focus on the Bible and doctrines about Jesus have led the Christian church astray. To recover the transformative power of the gospel-"the good news"-Gomes says we must go beyond the Bible and rediscover how to live out Jesus's original revolutionary message of hope. With eloquence and insight, using examples from ancient times as well as modern pop culture, Gomes shows us why the good news is every bit as relevant today as it was when first preached.
Publisher:
Released:
Nov 15, 2007
ISBN:
9781400174997
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Peter J. Gomes has been minister of Harvard University's Memorial Church since 1974, when he was appointed Pusey Minister of the church, and serves as Plummer Professor of Christian Morals. An American Baptist minister, he was named one of America's top preachers by Time magazine. He is the recipient of thirty-three honorary degrees and an Honorary Fellow of Emmanuel College, the University of Cambridge, England, where the Gomes Lectureship is established in his name.

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What people think about The Scandalous Gospel of Jesus

4.0
7 ratings / 4 Reviews
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  • (3/5)
    Good, but not great. The ramblings of a liberal Christian. And, I don't say this in a negative way, for I myself am liberal in many views. Made for a good read, but I thought the book lost it's luster towards the end as it seemed to become rather repetitive on the same issues (oppression, racism, counter-culture, etc). Although there was some good insight into the teachings of Christ, I didn't think Gomes offered anything new and fresh. I thought there was an over abundance of quotes taken from old hymns that I simply couldn't understand much in the same way I cannot understand Old King James English.Although liberal on many views I still remain conservative on the issue of homosexuality.... seemingly a highly emphasized issue throughout this book. While I agree wholeheartedly with Gomes that homosexuals should be included in the church, be allowed to serve, and even take on leadership positions, I still maintain that homosexuality is a sin. A sin, like all others that must be confessed, repented from, and dealt with. This does not mean it will be conquered, but action must be taken by the individual to fight it and strive towards victory to defeat it.I applaud Gomes for his stand for pacifism and inclusiveness, and his stand against biblicism and religious fundamentalism. I also enjoyed his personal stories of meeting famous people throughout his lifetime. And, I appreciated his knowledge of early American religious history for which he frequently alluded to throughout this book. Here are a few quotes taken from "The Scandalous Gospel of Jesus" that resonated with me the most:"That the image of martyrs, the suffering faithful, and oppressed witnesses to the truth does not seem to be the prevailing images of Christians in the world either in ancient or modern times serves to demonstrate the sad fact that conformity is a greater characteristic of the Christian community than nonconformity." (page 47)"God is greater and more generous than the best of those who profess to know and serve him." (page 63)"Perhaps the greatest tragedy of September 11th, 2001, and the life we have come to live in its aftermath, is that we have since been programmed to live by our fears and not by our hopes." (page 104)"Quoting John Newton: When I get to heaven, I shall see three wonders there. the first wonder will be to see any people there whom I did not expect to see; the second wonder will be to miss many people whom I did expect to see; and the third and greatest wonder of all will be to find myself there." (page 153)"The means that allows the winds of change to blow through the corridors of conformity is the powerful work of the Spirit, that third member of the trinity that makes the church a slave neither to history nor to the moment , but rather an agency of transformation." (page 204)
  • (4/5)
    The culmination of Gomes' trilogy which started with [book: The Good Book], this book was pretty much preaching to the choir as far as I was concerned, so of course I liked it. Also, Gomes uses hymns to make his point a lot of the time, which was great. As a gay, liberal Christian, chaplain at "Godless Harvard," and consistently rated as one of America's best preachers, Gomes has a lot to offer. I particularly liked his differentiating between optimism and hope. My one quibble would be that he has a little too gloomy a view of the state of mainline churches in the US. If you read [book: Christianity for the Rest of Us] or simply go out and look, you can find many vital churches preaching and living out "The Scandalous Gospel of Jesus" already.
  • (4/5)
    Peter's first book looked at the Bible. His second book looks at how we live it out emphasizing that the Bible is the beginning of the gospel. He fluidly highlights that Jesus' teaching isn't defined by the Left or Right, fundamentalist/liberal but had plenty to afflict and heal all. Then he moves to remind us that the gospel is both spiritual and social, a needed reminder for both sides that harp on one but forget the other. My favorite paragraph was one reminding us if we are comfortable with the gospel we may not be listening.for a more theological depth I might suggest 'You are Accepted' by Tillich or 'Shall the fundamentalist win' by Fosdick.
  • (4/5)
    Peter J.Gomes is a good writer. He's obviously well-educated and widely read, and makes thorough use of that background in this book. He reminds me very much of C.S. Lewis.What makes much of his writing, but especially this book, so interesting is his how old-fashioned he is. He is a truly conservative Christian. He laments the abandonment of church traditions, old hymns in particular, from which he quotes frequently throughout the book. But he is not by any measure a member of the "Religious Right". He puts forth a defense of homosexuality that is, to my knowledge, the most passionate and well-grounded in all Christendom (not that he has a great deal of competition).The depth and breadth of the author's knowledge makes this book stand out in a field that is depressingly lacking in intellectual vigor. Gomes doesn't rest on his scholarly laurels, however. It's obvious Gomes loves the Church, loves the traditions of Christianity, and has a great deal of understanding and compassion for the people within and without those traditions. This combination of heart and mind is a rare thing, and makes this book just as engrossing as his others.A final note. Gomes often repeats terms and phrases throughout the book. It might seem a bit odd and be a distraction to the reader. It should be remembered, though, that Gomes is a preacher from the American Baptist church. This sort of repetition is common and quite effective in preaching. If it's use in writing doesn't work for you, I suggest reading the book out loud as if you were preaching it to a congregation. You'll find it much more agreeable.