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The Mostly True Story of Jack

The Mostly True Story of Jack

Written by Kelly Barnhill

Narrated by Luke Daniels


The Mostly True Story of Jack

Written by Kelly Barnhill

Narrated by Luke Daniels

ratings:
3.5/5 (21 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Released:
Jan 10, 2012
ISBN:
9781455869671
Format:
Audiobook

Description

When Jack is sent to Hazelwood, Iowa, to live with his strange aunt and uncle, he expects a summer of boredom. Little does he know that the people of Hazelwood have been waiting for him for a long time....

When he arrives, three astonishing things happen: First, he makes friends-?not imaginary friends but actual friends. Second, he is beaten up by the town bully; the bullies at home always ignored him. Third, the richest man in town begins to plot Jack's imminent, and hopefully painful, demise. It's up to Jack to figure out why suddenly everyone cares so much about him. Back home he was practically, well, invisible.

The Mostly True Story of Jack is a tale of magic, friendship, and sacrifice. It's about things broken and things put back together. Above all, it's about finding a place to belong.

Released:
Jan 10, 2012
ISBN:
9781455869671
Format:
Audiobook

About the author



Reviews

What people think about The Mostly True Story of Jack

3.7
21 ratings / 11 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (1/5)
    Thanks to dull, detached writing, this potentially suspenseful and darkly-whimsical tale has had the charm sucked out of it.
  • (3/5)
    Utterly weird. And not, I'm afraid, very interesting to me. Jack is too strange, and too whiny, to hold my interest; the events are too confusing, and by the time things started connecting and making sense the book was almost over. I liked Wendy, a bit, and Anders quite a lot - but they're very definitely secondary characters, with tiny POV parts. Frankie is also too strange, and too much of a deus ex machina. And so on. One thing that bothered me throughout was Jack's stubbornness about what was going on - he determinedly ignored everything that happened around him. And the timeline, when it's finally revealed, makes it even odder - only four years? So all his memories of normality must have been implanted...and why couldn't they be removed, or at least lightened, so that he could understand better? I guess Clive fits the stereotype of the incompetent magician...sort of. Don't know. Overall, too many things bothered me. The basic structure was mildly interesting, but where it was different from what I've seen before it seemed weaker. So...not a favorite, or one I'm interested in rereading.
  • (3/5)
    My problem right out of the gate is that this a genre I have never been much fond of to begin with. I've never bought into the entire Midwestern town being fueled by magic ... maybe I'm too pragmatic, but it starts raising a whole lot of TQM flags for me, a entire town, that's a lot of infrastructure to deal with.And there's too much magic in this book for my taste. I guess this is ... Nearly every plot turn is driven by magic. Why did that happen? Oh, magic! I always wonder what the point of the book is (it's sort of like how I feel about basketball - everything always happens in the last five minutes of the game, what's the point of playing the first part of the game then, just play five minute games) when the courage or intelligence or kindness (or lack of) of the characters takes such a significant back seat to the magic. You could cut right to the end, where it all gets resolved by ... magic! And I don't think I'm the sharpest knife in the drawer by any means, but I had a challenging time keeping up with the "rules" of how this magic was supposed to work. I couldn't keep the magical players or the timeline straight in my head, and I had to go back and carefully read several of the descriptions related to this in order to suss everything out. Finally, what kind of nonsense is it to publish a book with a title so similar to a recent Newbery Honor book (The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg)? Was the runner up choice From the Mixed Up Files of Mr. Horace Avery?I am giving it a generous three stars because I know that I am never going to like this style of book but I respect the possibility that others might not be as biased to start with.
  • (4/5)
    Jack has been invisible almost all his life, even in the eyes of his family. after his parents divorce he was sent to Hazelwood, Iowa, to live with his aunt and uncle. all h expected was boredom but found friendship instead. Mr. Avery, the richest man in town seems to plotting his death. The question is why? Why is everyone interested in him all of a sudden?I enjoyed the book. I found it to be a story, a good one at that. But not one that is made much of an impact. Nevertheless, a good read.
  • (4/5)
    Jack has always felt invisible. Which is a normal way for a kid to feel sometimes, but what if your own mom forgets who you are? When Jack is sent away from San Francisco to live with his kooky aunt and uncle in Iowa while his parents undergo a divorce, he is nervous and angry. After all, what is there for a kid to do in a small town in Iowa?But what Jack doesn't know is that this town has things happening below the surface, growing, boiling, slithering, things that could threaten everything he learns to care for. A mysterious book and some oddball friends are the only things there to point Jack in the right direction and find out what his (mostly) true story is.Kelly Barnhill does a great job of creating an ominous feeling in this novel. While Jack is a likable character, and you will root for him, you will also find yourself questioning whether or not he is everything he believes himself to be. If you like mystery stories, or off-kilter fantasy, this is a great book to check out!
  • (5/5)
    This story is truly captivating. It is suspenseful and well written and unique. It is the story of Jack, who has been ignored and felt invisible for all of his life, until his parents split up and he is sent to live with his aunt and uncle in Iowa. Suddenly, people notice him. A lot. He makes his first friends and learns that magic exists and he is a part of it. The setting and characters are richly and well developed and the story draws you into it just as the children are drawn in as well. We follow Jack and Wendy and Frankie and Anders in this town where magic erupts in certain places, such as that of the old schoolhouse where many children disappeared in the past and Jack's Aunt and Uncle's house which warms to Jack's touch and where vines grow into his bedroom. They must stop Mr. Avery, who really is not a bad person, he only wants to save his own son. In the end, it is all up to Jack. I really enjoyed the uniqueness of this story. So many fantasies have the same plot line. This one is pleasantly different.