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A River Runs Through It and Other Stories

A River Runs Through It and Other Stories

Written by Norman Maclean

Narrated by David Manis


A River Runs Through It and Other Stories

Written by Norman Maclean

Narrated by David Manis

ratings:
4.5/5 (34 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Released:
Sep 30, 2010
ISBN:
9781615731138
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

Description

In A River Runs Through It, Norman Maclean claims that “in my family, there is no clear line between religion and fly-fishing.” Nor is there a clear line between family and fly-fishing. It is the one activity where brother can connect with brother and father with son, bridging troubled relationships at the junction of great trout rivers in western Montana. In Maclean’s autobiographical novella, it is the river that makes them realize that life continues and all things are related.

Just as Norman Maclean writes at the end of A River Runs Through It that he is “haunted by waters,” so have readers been haunted by his novella. A retired English professor who began writing fiction at the age of 70, Maclean produced what is now recognized as one of the classic American stories of the twentieth century.

Here, with A River Runs Through It, are two Norman Maclean stories never before on audio:
  • Logging and Pimping and “Your Pal, Jim”
  • USFS 1919: The Ranger, the Cook, and a Hole in the Sky
  • Released:
    Sep 30, 2010
    ISBN:
    9781615731138
    Format:
    Audiobook

    Also available as...

    Also available as ebookEbook

    About the author

    Norman Maclean has been a student of western religious thought for over fifty years and has specialised in the study of life in the Mediterranean region during the first century C.E. He has lectured and written on associated subjects; is a teacher of Classical Studies and has conducted tour groups to Egypt, Jordan, Israel, Turkey, Greece and Italy. Ancient Jewish culture and its clash with both Greek and Roman influences has been his particular interest which has taken him several times to Israel for exploration of archaeological sites and further study of Christianity’s emergence. He lives in Gisborne, New Zealand and is also an artist, public speaker and theatrical director.



    Reviews

    What people think about A River Runs Through It and Other Stories

    4.3
    34 ratings / 28 Reviews
    What did you think?
    Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

    Reader reviews

    • (4/5)
      A River Runs Through It is Norman Maclean’s affectionate and lyrical account of the bond fly fishing forged between himself and his father and brother. Fly fishing is a metaphor for beauty and grace but ultimately the book is about loving those we do not understand. Although I think I understand the role of fly fishing in the book, I am not a fisherman and eventually found the descriptions of the minutia of the art a little tiresome. That said, I love this book and have read it several times.There are two other stories in the volume, Logging and Pimping and “Your Pal, Jim” and "USFS 1919: The Ranger, the Cook, and a Hole in the Sky". Both are good but neither rises to the level of River.
    • (5/5)
      On the surface, the title story is his recollections of his father, a Presbyterian minister, and his troubled but talented brother, with whom he fished. Set in the Montana of Maclean's youth, he paints exquisitely vivid and beautiful word pictures of a land and water and family now gone. At the core is the frustration of the often-futile attempt of trying to help another or trying to save a loved one from their self-destruction. (this paragraph lifted from Amazon)This is one of my favorite books - MacLean's description of the river, the mountains, and the trees is poetry in prose. The imagery is compelling. The book is highly autobiographical: though it focuses on a small part of the author's life, he tells the story so that everything that he has learned about life reflects through these experiences. This book is full of beautiful language describing nature, people, and God.
    • (4/5)
      a very wonderful book
    • (4/5)
      A really lovely and understated book. Took me a while to get into it, however. It was also one of those books that I wish I had just sat down and read in one sitting (it's only 150 pages) because I think it would have had a greater impact as a whole thing.

      Sometimes there was a little too much information about fly fishing. I get that it was sometimes a metaphor, but still...

      I did love the way that the approach to fly fishing reflected the family relationships and expectations. I thought the last scene was beautiful.
    • (4/5)
      At first I was really annoyed by this book. It was set up in such a weird way. Instead of chapters this novel was one continuous story. This continued to annoy me until I read the following found towards the end of the novel. "As the heat mirages on the river in front of me danced with and through each other, I could feel patterns from my own life joining with them. It was here, while waiting for my brother, that I started this story, although, of course, at the time I did not know that stories of life are often more like rivers than books. But I knew a story had begun, perhaps long ago near the sound of water. And I sensed that ahead I would meet something that would never erode so there would be a sharp turn, deep circles a deposit, and quietness" (99). The book is set up the way it is because of the river.
      It's a great little read. You'll learn a lot about fishing and just life in general. I would recommend checking it out.
    • (5/5)
      Maclean does a superb job in the novella, which is rightly considered a classic.

      It drives me slightly crazy when people suggest this book is about fly fishing (and I say that as a fly fisherman). It's about Maclean's family, and to that end, he carefully and honestly paints a group portrait that absolutely entranced me.

      A River Runs Through It was turned into a movie (and survived it better than most works of literature), and has been commercialized and overused by every fly fishermen who fancies himself a writer.

      Fortunately, the book sits, waiting to be read and enjoyed for what it is -- a superb portrait of an interesting (if somewhat tragic) family. A must read.