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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Fallen Heroes

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Fallen Heroes

Written by Dafydd ab Hugh

Narrated by René Auberjonois


Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Fallen Heroes

Written by Dafydd ab Hugh

Narrated by René Auberjonois

ratings:
4/5 (8 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Released:
May 1, 1994
ISBN:
9780743546232
Format:
Audiobook

Description

When a troop of alien warriors demands the return of an imprisoned comrade -- a prisoner no one on Deep Space Nine™ knows anything about -- Commander Benjamin Sisko has a deadly fight on his hands. Under sudden attack from the heavily armed warriors, Sisko and his crew struggle desperately to repel the invaders and save the lives of everyone on board.

Meanwhile, a strange device from the Gamma Quadrant has shifted Ferengi barkeeper Quark and Security Chief Odo three days into the future to a silent Deep Space Nine. To save the station they must discover what caused the invasion to take place, and find a pathway back through time itself.

Released:
May 1, 1994
ISBN:
9780743546232
Format:
Audiobook


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8 ratings / 3 Reviews
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  • (4/5)
    This is a good book taking place during the early seasons of the TV show. The Audiobook is read by Rene Auberjonois, which is fun as Odo is the principal character, along with Quark. ab Hugh does a good job with all the characterizations - clearly has a good handle on each unique personality. I loved the show and if you did as well, you'll enjoy this book.
  • (3/5)
    This wasn't so bad. I've read a couple of other things written by Dafydd ab Hugh and boy oh boy were they bad. This book wasn't perfect either, but much better than his other forays. Although it could have also been the fact that the story in Fallen Heroes was such that the canon characters could act slightly out of character and it wasn't quite as obvious as in other Star Trek DS9 novels.I'ts not a happy go lucky story at all. Actually, it would probably never have been able to be on TV, even within the DS9 series and that one was the darker of the four 'modern' serieses. There are aliens who come searching for someone and they're not the sort of take prisoners aliens by a long shot.And, of course, there's the obsession that some Star Trek novel writers have with 'ancient' chemical weapons. i.e. handguns, rifles that use solid bullets, etc. That's where the plot gets a little iffy for me. On the one hand these aliens are advanced enough to build a ship, and yet they can't do better than P90s and nuclear weapons? That's not Star Trek to me, but maybe I'm in a minority.Anyway, for the most part it was a pretty good book, aside from the few wrong characterizations there were (really, Trills spots turn white, or really why can no one get Odo right, either he's portrayed as mean or a bumbling idiot. Thank the great bird that Rene Auberjonois was so awesome in his portrayal on the show). A three star book that may have been four stars if someone else had written it.
  • (4/5)
    When Quark inadvertantly activates an alien signal device, invaders infiltrate DS9 and slaughter ensues. Although badly written, this book features a tight, creative plot that would have made a fine episode (albeit a very bloody one). I expect sloppy prose in a Trek novel, but it's important for the author to get the dialogue right, and Dafydd ab Hugh succeeds for the most part. The central characters are Quark and Odo; their interaction is handled well. At this point in the series, Odo's nature and backstory had not been developed very well, so ab Hugh has him doing some things that don't quite jibe with the way he would be developed later, but that's forgivable. In particular, the climax requires him to withstand some impossibly harsh environmental conditions. All in all, though, it's a good read if you like Trek.