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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Warped

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Warped

Written by K. W. Jeter

Narrated by René Auberjonois


Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Warped

Written by K. W. Jeter

Narrated by René Auberjonois

ratings:
2.5/5 (4 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Released:
Mar 1, 1995
ISBN:
9780743546218
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Political tensions on Bajor are once again on the rise, and the various factions may soon come to open conflict. In addition, a series of murders has shaken everyone on board the station. While Security Chief Odo investiages the murders, Commander Sisko finds himself butting up against a new religious faction that plans to take over Bajor and force the Federation to leave Deep Space Nine™.

Odo traces the murders to a bizarre and dangerous new form of holosuite technology, a technology that turns its users into insane killers, and now threatens Sisko's son, Jake. As the situation on Bajor deteriorates, Sisko learns that the political conflict and the new holosuites are connected, and part of the plan of a dangerous madman.

Released:
Mar 1, 1995
ISBN:
9780743546218
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

K. W. JETER is the international and New York Times bestselling author of science fiction novels including Farewell Horizontal, Death Arms and Madlands, horror/thrillers including The Night Man, Soul Eater and Dark Seeker, and media tie-ins including the Star Wars: Bounty Hunter Wars trilogy and the authorized Blade Runner book sequels The Edge of Human and Replicant Night. After living in both England and Spain, he currently resides in San Francisco, California.

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2.5
4 ratings / 2 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (1/5)
    Hmm, it looks like nobody really liked this book all that much, particularly since the common thread through the reviews (both of them ? though there are more now) is that the characters in the novel behave nothing like the characters in the series, and that the author obviously did not follow the guidelines in the Writer's Bible (a book, I suspect, that outlines a number of rules to follow when writing for the series). There is also a suggestion that they have decided to throw another killer onto the spacestation that Odo has to catch, and on top of that the Cardassians are trying to establish a space station on the other side of the wormhole to pretty much control who uses it.Well, that is all I will say about the novel because I really cannot remember much about it and it was a long time since I actually read it. I am not a huge trekkie, and in many cases only watch it to get a dose of science-fiction. It did enjoy the series tough, especially when the story arc about the Dominion began to develop. In a way it was better that the other series, particularly Voyager where the only goal was to get home. However I have noticed that the writers try to be as politically correct as possible, and that does get somewhat annoying (a Black Vulcan, woah, we really have come far).As for the series itself, I have begun watching them again (though how far I will get through them is yet to be seen), and though I am only up to episode six of the first season, there are a few things that stand out. First and foremost is the acting, it is quite annoying. While I would not necessarily call it bad, I would not call it outstanding either. I have also been watching the first season of Rome, and the acting in Rome is outstanding, though in parts the writers seem to switch between a more modern rendering of the dialogue and a Shakespearian form. That is something that does take a lot of skill, and I must say is completely absent from many of the other series that I have seen. In this series, and while it is only the beginning, it really does come across that the actors have not fully fallen into their roles yet, though it was also something noticeable in the first season of The Next Generation.One of the things that I do like about the series though is the relationship between Quark and Odo. In a way they are complete opposites but simply cannot exist without each other. They actually do develop a very strong relationship even though they tend to be a foil to each other. In fact I do like how the writers ended up developing the Ferengi through bringing Quark into the series. We get a much better idea on how they operate. In the Next Generation they were little more than traders who would always be out to earn a quick buck even at other people's expense. Obviously they really did not like the Federation's idea of equality and growing one's own character. To them the most important thing is money and making a profit. In a way it seems as if the writers are attempting to externalise human failings into other races to leave us as an enlightened and wise race.Babylon 5 was so much better in how they developed and explored human evolution, as does George Bernard Shaw in Back to Methusela. This series just seems to be humanity suddenly waking up one morning and saying, 'gee, we have been really bad, I think we need to change our ways or people (the Vulcans) won't like us'. I also pretty much despise the idea of tossing religion out of the window and blaming it for all our failings. To be honest, who has the right to determine that one religion (scientific materialism) is any better, worse, or more advanced, than any other religion. By determining that the only true religion is scientific materialism then you are doing exactly the same thing that you are accusing all of the other religions of doing, and that is being exclusive and insisting that the other person is wrong. When you then ban another religion in place of your religion, well, you have now become a persecutor, something that you objected against back during the Scopes Monkey Trial. How things come full circle (oh, and yes, Christians are also guilty of this).
  • (2/5)
    Finally, a Star Trek DS9 novel in which Jadzia Dax has a big role, and yet unfortunately it doesn't live up to its fellow Star Trek novels. Star Trek Novels are interesting things. Most of them are three star books, they have solid if unsurprising plots and the writing flows and is good enough that it doesn't get in the way of the story. Here and there, there will be an amazingly written Star Trek novel like Imzadi or Q-Squared, and then there are really bad ones too. This novel leaned towards the latter group.It was about holodecks and holodeck technology that gets into the user's head instead of he or she just seeing, hearing, etc. the holoprojections. THere's also the Bajoran provisional government coming under attack by a bunch of extremist Bajorans who want to be in power.The main problem is that there is so much science in it, but its done in a way that made nearly no sense to me, and I'm usually pretty good at puzzling out the Star Trek tech, but in this novel it just seemed to turn into a jumbled mess. I also really didn't like how the author wrote the Jadzia (the host)/Dax (the symbionte) interactions. It came off as having her seem a bit more schizo than she's ever ever been in the show.