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Wild Roses

Wild Roses

Written by Deb Caletti

Narrated by Angela Dawe


Wild Roses

Written by Deb Caletti

Narrated by Angela Dawe

ratings:
4/5 (8 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Released:
May 20, 2010
ISBN:
9781423396512
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Seventeen-year-old Cassie Morgan lives with a time bomb (a.k.a. her stepfather, Dino Cavalli). To the public, Dino is a world-renowned violin player and composer. To Cassie, he's an erratic, self-centered bully. And he's getting worse: He no longer sleeps, and he grows increasingly paranoid. Before Cassie was angry. Now she is afraid.

Enter Ian Waters: a brilliant young violinist, and Dino's first-ever student. The minute Cassie lays eyes on Ian, she knows she's doomed. Cassie thought she understood that love could bring pain, but this union will have consequences she could not have imagined.

In the end, only one thing becomes clear: In the world of insanity, nothing is sacred. . . .

Released:
May 20, 2010
ISBN:
9781423396512
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Deb Caletti is the award-winning and critically acclaimed author of over sixteen books for adults and young adults, including Honey, Baby, Sweetheart, a finalist for the National Book Award; A Heart in a Body in the World, a Michael L. Printz Honor Book; Girl, Unframed; and One Great Lie. Her books have also won the Josette Frank Award for Fiction, the Washington State Book Award, and numerous other state awards and honors, and she was a finalist for the PEN USA Award. She lives with her family in Seattle.


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Reviews

What people think about Wild Roses

3.9
8 ratings / 7 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    A beautifully written and detailed novel that through fiction examines the relationship between artistic genius and levels of imental illness. Indeed, heavy stuff for a YA novel and probably intense for those seeking what currently constitutes some whiny YA relationship novels with their focus on self-esteem and clothing and possessions. Caletti definitly is a skilled writer, bringing to life her ensemble of characters and making them feel true and mostly likeable.

    An excellent read.
  • (4/5)
    An intense and unforgettable novel of both the price of fame and madness. Cassie's life is slowly crumbling living with her brillaint but mental unstable step-father, Dino. With that, Cassie will have to fight for her first love and regaining her life.
  • (4/5)
    Before this I've only read another book by Deb Caletti (The Nature of Jade), and it was just okay. Thankfully, I liked this one much much better. This book was about Cassie Morgan, who has divorced parents, and a step-father who is a famous violinst. To the outside world, Dino may seem like a genius musician and composer from a small town in Italy, but Cassie knows the truth. Dino is a terrifying, selfish, insane bully, who just gets crazier and more paranoid every day. Cassie can't imagine why her mom fell for him, and doesn't want anything to do with love....that is, until she meets Ian Waters, Dino's new protege. I really liked this book. I found Cassie to be a wonderful narrator. She was both funny and insightful. There were many parts where I was nodding in agreement or stifling laughter. Denifite quotable material. Initally though, I didn't quite like the style. It seemed a little too informal for my taste, but I quickly got over it. I found the characters lively and three-dimensional. Except for Ian. I did not like him. He was hardly in the book, which made the romance seem improbable. I liked this book, but I wouldn't consider it a romance. In fact, it would have been fine without any romantic aspects at all. Just the family dynamic seemed enough. I was also surprised with how everything turned out. It's not a suspenseful edge-of-your-seat book, but is certainly absorbing. I will definitely be checking out more of Deb Caletti's books in the future.
  • (4/5)
    As I musician, I really connected with Dino's music obsession, as well as Ian's love-hate relationship with it. I am also tirelessly preparing for university auditions as we speak, although my teacher is not as mean as Dino, and it was, in a way, a really comforting read despite the subject matter. To me, this book holds the perfect balance for a YA novel. It deals with difficult subjects, namely mental illness, and by no means glosses over the subject. What I loved about it was how Deb Caletti managed to discuss serious real life issues, without making the book a complete downer. I like to read for enjoyment, and I don't enjoy reading about horrid topics with no light at the end of the tunnel. That being said, we don't get our perfect Hollywood Happily-Ever-After, but the reader is at least left satisfied.I found the author's unique descriptions and metaphors refreshing, the ones that make you go, "Oh yeah, I know that feeling!". I did notice a few similar metaphors creeping up repetitively, but for the most part I appreciated the quirkiness of them. A fantastic cast of characters, all unique in their own way.
  • (4/5)
    Cassie is the narrator of Wild Roses, and her life has gotten just a little bit confusing. It started when her parents got divorced, continued when her mother remarried mentally disturbed world-famous violinist Dino Cavalli, and got even worse when Cassie met Ian, a young violinist whose playing melts Cassie despite her usually being impervious to the power of music. Dino is off his meds trying to produce new work for an upcoming concert, and slowly coming unhinged. To keep him sane and focused, Dino takes Ian, who is trying to get into a premiere music school, as a student. Soon, Cassie finds that all the confusing and difficult parts of her life are colliding.I confess I had a Child of Divorce Reunion Fantasy Number One Thousand, where I for a moment imagined my father finding out that Dino really was a killer woman and that my parents would have to get back together. I saw them running through a meadow, hand in hand. Okay, maybe not a meadow. But I saw me having only one Christmas and one phone number and only my father's shaved bristles in the bathroom sink.Cassie is a great narrator, strong and smart yet vulnerable, serious but with a biting and laugh out loud funny sarcastic wit. She comes off as pretty normal and well-adjusted, but behind the scenes she's struggling with the fear and potential humiliation that comes with living with Dino, with the occasional irrational fantasy of her parents reuniting, and of course, with her feelings for Ian and whether she is willing to let him get close even though she knows that his very circumstances guarantee that he will soon leave. She's a veritable everygirl trying to keep up the front of being fine while dealing with trouble at home, parents that can't quite be relied upon, and her first feelings of real love for Ian. I couldn't believe it. I loved my mother and I loved my father, but there in that circle I felt something I hadn't for a long time. It was something I'd been missing, that I'd been long for without even realizing it. It was a sense of family.Wild Roses definitely has it pegged. Life with the paranoid and mentally ill, life as a "Child of Divorce," and life as a normal girl falling for a guy she knows she shouldn't. Other than a slight problem with pacing that probably results from trying to cover each angle equally and a finish that seems to peter out more than definitively end, Wild Roses is a sweet and honest story about real love, trust, and learning to let people in.
  • (3/5)
    The beginning of this book is really tedious with overwrought descriptions of Tuscany and sentimental, metaphorical descriptions of music that seem out of character for a narrator who works hard at being scientific and unsentimental. That said, the tyrannical environment that Cassie has to endure and the instant passion between Cassie and Ian make the book quite compelling after the first 30 or so pages. This book is a nice blend of the realistic problems children of divorce face with the overwhelming and intoxicating feelings of first love. This book would be appropriate for readers patient enough to wade through the first chapter.
  • (5/5)
    At seventeen, Cassie is a reasonably well-adjusted student with decent grades, friends, two parents who love her (unfortunately they're divorced), and brilliant step-father. On the surface, all is wonderful. This is the story of what's happening behind the facade. World-famous concert violinist Dino Cavalli is slipping deeper into mental illness. Off his medication and under extreme pressure, minor cracks turn into fissures and threaten to consume everything and everyone around him. Sprinkled with mentions of real-life geniuses who've come to bad ends, Cassie narrates her step-father's rush toward madness. An eminently readable book with enough bright spots to keep it from being depressing. Perhaps the ending could have been a bit less abrupt, and the footnotes were somewhat distracting, but all in all, I enjoyed it.