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The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ

The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ

Written by Philip Pullman

Narrated by Philip Pullman


The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ

Written by Philip Pullman

Narrated by Philip Pullman

ratings:
3.5/5 (57 ratings)
Length:
3 hours
Released:
May 20, 2010
ISBN:
9781441857996
Format:
Audiobook

Description

This is a story.

In this ingenious and spellbinding retelling of the life of Jesus, Philip Pullman revisits the most influential story ever told.

Charged with mystery, compassion and enormous power, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ throws fresh light on who Jesus was and asks the listener questions that will continue to reverberate long after the final word is spoken. For above all, this audiobook is about how stories become stories.

Released:
May 20, 2010
ISBN:
9781441857996
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Philip Pullman (b. 1946) is one of the world’s most acclaimed children’s authors, his bold, brilliant books having set new parameters for what children’s writing can say and do. He is best known for the His Dark Materials trilogy, installments of which have won the Carnegie Medal and the Whitbread Book of the Year Award. In 2003, the trilogy came third in the BBC’s Big Read competition to find the nation’s favorite book, and in 2005 he was awarded the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children’s literature. In 2007, Northern Lights became a major Hollywood film, The Golden Compass, starring Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig. Pullman has published nearly twenty books, and when he’s not writing he likes to play the piano (badly), draw, and make things out of wood.


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What people think about The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ

3.7
57 ratings / 45 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    This beautiful alternate version of the story of Jesus Christ reads like a lost Gospel - one that no orthodoxy would have ever allowed to see the light of day. Rarely has such a gentle book been so challenging. Much, much better than an aggresively anti-religious polemic.
  • (4/5)
    Philip Pullman's book based on the life of Jesus has garnered quite a lot of angry reviews and controversy. Some people have even decided that they don't need for him to die and be judged by their god to know that he's "going to hell" -- they can judge that for themselves, in their infinite wisdom! The problem seems to be that Pullman, like many people in the modern world, doesn't believe the stories of the Bible are anything more or less than the stories that come to us from Ancient Greece or Rome. The series he's writing for, Canongate's myth series, has touched on those mythologies before, which are often (but not universally) considered to be fictional now: it is a bit of a step from that to doing this.

    If anything, I think Pullman sticks too close to the source material. He has an intriguing idea: Jesus had a twin brother, and when he 'rises from the dead', it is that twin brother, still living, who actually speaks to his followers as though he is Jesus. I suspect that was the germ of the story, though a whole commentary about truth and history, and the purpose of rewritten history, is built around it.

    Still, despite this idea, he sticks very close to the words of the Bible. His writing has a parable-like quality, here: it's clear and easy to read, but with some beautiful imagery. One of my favourite quotations is copied below, in which Jesus speaks to a God who does not seem to answer, about what he believes a church should be.

    "Lord, if I thought you were listening, I'd pray for this above all: that any church set up in your name should remain poor, and powerless, and modest. That it should wield no authority except that of love. That it should never cast anyone out. That it should own no property and make no laws. That it should not condemn, but only forgive. That it should be not like a palace with marble walls and polished floors, and guards standing at the door, but like a tree with its roots deep in the soil, that shelters every kind of bird and beast and gives blossom in the spring and shade in the hot sun and fruit in the season, and in time gives up its good sound wood for the carpenter; but that sheds many thousands of seeds so that new trees can grow in its place. Does the tree say to the sparrow, 'Get out, you don't belong here?' Does the tree say to the hungry man, 'This fruit is not for you?' Does the tree test the loyalty of the beasts before it allows them into the shade?"

    Passages like this are the reason I rated this book so highly.

    Pullman is critical of the church, mostly the Catholic church, with some very specific digs at it, including the abuse of children by priests. But his words stay close to those of the Bible, often repeating it almost word for word, like it's just a more colloquial translation. There wasn't enough of the new frame story, I think.

    I don't think Pullman's views are so insensitive. If your religion can't bear criticism and opposition, then you need to think about why that is. His portrayal of Jesus as a good, human, doubting man ends up being a lovely one, a tender one. He never claims that what he's saying is truth, only that this is one way it could have happened: this is clearly fiction.
  • (4/5)
    Absolutely riveting re-imagining of the Jesus story, with lots of recourse to the Gnostic Gospels. The conceit here is that Jesus and Christ are twins, and Jesus is the guy with the message- the guy who heals the sick, the guy who has that no-nonsense spirituality one might recognize from parts of the Gospels. Christ, OTOH, stands in for the church, for the status quo, for the massaging of information.

    Really well done, says this non-believer.
  • (4/5)
    An interesting and provocative retelling of the gospels. Pullman does a fine job of skewering the absurdities and hnypocrisies of organized religion as he does in His Dark Materials trilogy.
  • (4/5)
    I respect atheism very much, but I'm not a fan of two of its most well-known spokesmen, Dawkins & Hitchens. I was hoping that this book wouldn't force me to group Pullman in with them, and it didn't. Though he criticizes the church and portrays Jesus as non-divine, Pullman doesn't condescend to Christianity or dismiss all of its ideas. Simply written, but not all of the "scoundrel's" moral dilemmas are easy to resolve.
  • (2/5)
    Did you mean: The Grand Inquisitor by Fyodor Dostoyevsky?

    Well, it's very similar to the other stories (and some rather heavy quoting from the Gnostic Gospels), but you might as well steal from the best.
  • (3/5)
    I liked the idea of the original Jesus, with his very personal message, and the more institutional Christ being brothers. Also, the fact that Christ from the start tries to mold what Jesus says and does to fit his grand design, is quite inventive.

    Pullman's take on the the New Testament is pretty personal, but overall, the persona of Jesus becomes a lot more consistent.

    It looks as if Pullman tried to emulate typical biblical writing, but sometimes this results in a bit of a style clash, especially in the scenes that Pullman envisions as having gone totally different compared to the official version in the Bible (i.e. Christ's version).

    The basic idea, that Jesus wasn't a goody-two-shoes and intended his faith to be a very personal and spiritual affair, is something that I can only agree with.
  • (3/5)
    It's an interesting take on a much-told story. If you're interested in revisionist storytelling this is for you. There is only the teensiest bit of Pullman's views on organized religion in any direct way at the end--I was expecting more, actually, as I know he feels very strongly on the issue.

    Worth the read, if you like to think about what might have actually happened with this guy who lived long ago that a lot of people seem to think was pretty special.
  • (4/5)
    Fascinating retelling of the Greatest Story Ever Told - sketched with a light touch, a little wickedness, and an unexpected amount of respect. Intriguing, challenging, and very satisfying.
  • (5/5)
    I loved the trilogy "His dark materials" except for the fact that I thought the idea of killing off God was very underplayed and very anticlimactic. The being that Lyra kills off isn't even God but someone masquerading as God - a very weak, ineffectual substitute. There is no infinity or direct power involved in what she does. She truly does kill off an idea rather than anything else. God is more remarkable for his absence than his presence.In such a dramatic story, I felt that this aspect was skirted around and handled on tip toes with disappointing results. I therefore wanted to see whether Pullman addressed the topic more effectively in "Good man Jesus..." And he does. Interestingly, it is immediately obvious that the absence of God is once again the theme; only this time the absence is active, forceful and tragic. The whole "Why hast thou forsaken me" line takes on heartbreaking significance.But what I love about this book is that it isn't really about a "scoundrel" at all. The whole story is very sympathetically and movingly portrayed. Jesus is at times powerful and reverent, at times apparently lonely, angry and even unloving. But apart from his dramatic monologue towards the end, he is seen nearly entirely through the eyes of others, so it is hard to really feel identification with him. Christ is a different matter. And the true tragedy of the book is that he is no scoundrel. He is a man full of faith and devotion, to God and to his brother. It is he who believes in a God for all people, not just the Jewish people. And he truly believes, at least in the beginning, that truth is greater than history, and can be made to "irradiate history". He believes, unlike Jesus, that human frailty must be accepted and that people must be helped to be the best they can be, through carefully ministered loving order, rather than set up to fail to achieve perfection, unaided.It is the absence of God that betrays both Jesus and Christ. The church, like the crucifixion, is necessary only because it is the best possible substitute (or so Christ believes) for a genuine divine presence in people's everyday lives. The loneliness, the good intentions and the love, of both Christ and his brother Jesus, are portrayed in a way that is at once believable, sympathetic and powerful. I am delighted to finally see what I felt was missing from "His dark materials" and am very glad I took the time to read further.
  • (2/5)
    Eh. Nothing compared to The Golden Compass.
  • (3/5)
    this retelling of the story works pretty well. i has an undercurrent of humor that blends really well with the more serious tone. a friend (ann) recommended this book to me and initially i wasn't entirely convinced about reading another jesus story, although i was curious about Philip Pullman's version since he has been known to have an anti religious streak. it took until the conversation between jesus and christ where the latter is describing the future of the church to convince me. funny and dark. pretty irreverent. the language is simple but well crafted. although i don't care much about it, this story manages to be respectful. in a way the author seems to really like aspects of the jesus character and there is homage paid.
  • (2/5)
    So, ok, you know how you see celebrities wearing atrocious clothing but not on purpose, or doing really weird shit that seems disturbing and possibly dangerous, but no one stops them, and you wonder about why none of their friends or relatives told them to maybe tone it down a bit or get a new belt or wear underwear or go to therapy? Well I do believe there is a literary equivalent, and it showed up really well in some of Anne Rice's later works (from what I've heard), and now we have Philip Pullman's The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ.Guys, let's get this straight, I love me some Philip Pullman. His Dark Materials? Love them! Sally Lockhart? Love her! This book? DID NOT LOVE IT. This book is an... I don't know, almost a thought experiment. "What if Jesus was actually twins! And all the bad things I don't like about religion were thought up by one twin, and all these great things about faith and not having institutions like churches were actually said by the good twin! Which were then twisted by the bad twin into what we know today!" No, really. And then there was the anvil-licious part where he has the good twin (Jesus, natch) predicting the sex abuse scandals. NO, REALLY. I would throw in some quotes except I already returned this fucker to Amazon. I finished the book while lying in bed, looked at my shelves, looked at the book, said "I don't know where to shelve you," and for one of the first times ever availed myself of the option to not shelve the book and instead to return it.It's just, Philip Pullman, really? I expected better from you. Something with less anvils and more nuance, and that didn't offend me. And I'm an atheist! Didn't you have any friends who told you this was a bad idea? Not because of any strawmen like "people might get riled up" or whatever, but because it isn't any good. What was your editor thinking?
  • (4/5)
    Summary: The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ is a gospel: a retelling of the life of Jesus... and his twin brother, Christ. In Pullman's version, Mary gives birth to not one but two boys in the stable in Bethlehem. As the boys grow up, Jesus becomes a famous preacher and radical, while Christ remains in the background, recording the things his brother says and does. But while Jesus seems unconcerned with the future, and preaches about the imminent arrival of the Kingdom of Heaven, Christ - at the urging of a mysterious stranger - has begun thinking about the long-term: the founding of a church that will carry his brother's truths (or at least Christ's version of them) throughout history.Review: This short little book was fascinating, and - given what I know about Philip Pullman's attitudes towards religion - very surprising. For a book whose basic premise is, if not blasphemous per se, at least counter-scriptural, I thought that it was actually very respectful. Its goal is not to denigrate religion in general or even Christianity in specific, nor to excoriate the Church (which was what surprised me, given Pullman's attitude towards the Christian-Church-analog the Magisterium in His Dark Materials), but rather to encourage thought about the power of the church, and where it comes from, and how the stories of the New Testament may have been shaped by time, and by their passage through human hands, and what lies at the heart of belief, and the reality and the truth (which may not always be the same thing) of Jesus's life. I think this interplay between respect for people's belief system and the desire to think critically about that belief system is apparent in Pullman's treatment of Jesus's miracles. In every instance, Pullman gives a possible common-sense explanation for the miracle that does not involve invoking supernatural powers, but he almost always leaves it open, and rarely comes right out and says that it wasn't a miracle... because the point is not whether a given act was miraculous or not, but to understand why people might prefer the one explanation over the other. Of course, this does cut both ways: Pullman never outright names the mysterious stranger who is encouraging Christ to chronicle his brother's life, but the implication is hard to miss. Leaving the point open to interpretation, though, gives the story more subtlety and more power, no matter what the reader decides about the man's identity.One of the most fascinating (and most surprising) aspects of this book is that the dichotomy between Jesus and Christ is a lot more complex than what is suggested by the title. Neither one is entirely a good man nor a scoundrel, but they both embody both the good and the bad. Jesus, when preaching, comes off as kind of sanctimonious (and his admonitions about abandoning your family are a lot harsher when his twin brother is standing in the crowd), but his hour of doubt in the garden of Gethsemene, where he questions his own faith in the face of a silent God, completely turned him around for me. Meanwhile, Christ is constantly wracked with doubts of his own; doing what he does out of love for his brother, but still secretly injured by his brother's aloofness, and his own frustrated ambition. Similarly, Pullman is not even 100% anti-Church; he recognizes the church's power to inspire great works of art and compassion, while also questioning its adherence to dogma and the perils of having a body with such absolute philosophical and political power. It was frustrating at times (morally frustrating, not frustrating as a reader), because in their arguments, both Jesus and Christ were so often right in their points of view, and simultaneously so wrong, that it made me wonder how we still, two thousand years later, haven't figured it out yet. 4 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: To come clean: Although I was raised as what I call "vaguely Christian", I'm a non-believer, so without question my enjoyment and my interpretation of this book was colored by that perspective. But I think that The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ should be accessible, and interesting, to believers as well. It's not pushing an athiest agenda, but rather encouraging independent and critical thought. Those Christians who believe that the Bible is the infallible received word of God may want to steer clear, but those who are willing to take a "what if" look at their own beliefs should find plenty of food for thought.
  • (4/5)
    A clever idea well executed and always having the ring of a possible truth.
  • (4/5)
    In Phillip Pullman's post script for this he explains that he does not prescribe what the book means - it's up to the reader to bring their own meaning. I really enjoyed it as a work that explored some of the mythology of Christianity - and how there could be a rational explanation for some of the miracles described in the new testament. It also got me thinking about the difference between faith and religion. That historically there was a man called Jesus who had a message on how people should treat each other, but that the gospels that make up the new testament take a dogmatic approach to recording this. Reading it as an agnostic it makes perfect sense but I'd imagine it would be a difficult read for anyone with religious beliefs. I think what I liked about it was that it wasn't deliberately provocative (as you might expect bearing in mind the church's reaction to His Dark Materials). Instead it offers a rational explanation for the actions of Jesus and explores the difference between this and the story as it's portrayed in the gospels. This is based on a historical approach to interpreting the (often contradictory) gospels, including the lesser known gospels that have been suppressed by the church. This is a good read for anyone who's reflected that Christianity sometimes doesn't seem very Christian...
  • (3/5)
    This is alright, not a patch on His Dark Materials, but diverting enough for a quick read. To simplify somewhat, it uses the conceit of a 'good' twin Jesus - the prophet and idealist - and the 'bad' Christ - the church builder and tradition beginner - to discuss what Pullman sees and good and bad aspects of religion. Jesus brings a spiritual message of seemingly genuine authority, but Christ, wanting it to last forever and apply to everyone, flavours its chronicling with miracles, rituals and plans for a great Church to spread the Word across the world. The style of it is generally good, echoing the New Testament, but is broken annoyingly a few times for 'now this is the point' sections - sudden, several-page-long digressions on the wrongs of the Catholic Church, and a rather forced change of heart for one of the characters towards the end. Thought provoking at turns but not massively so.
  • (4/5)
    A story about how stories come to be. Much functions well as religious commentary but what impressed me most was the creativity involved, the splitting of the Biblical Jesus into twins, Jesus & Christ, and the interplay between them, using bits of proto-gospels and gnostic material.
  • (4/5)
    A very creative premise marred by the same overly didactic vices that characterized the third book of His Dark Materials, only worse in this case.
  • (3/5)
     I love Philip Pullman. I love His Dark Materials trilogy, which went a long way to show me how a book can be fantasy and deeply meaningful at the same time. He's a Milton scholar and based a lot of it on Paradise Lost- and it's a kids book! Not to mention all the parallels to the new physics, as well as a ripping good story with the evilest, scariest villain ever, Mrs. Coulter (no, I'm not talking about Ann Coulter, but she would be a runner-up). I even love his 19th century girl detective, Sally Lockhart ,series.The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ is a re-telling of the story of Jesus. Of course, the big difference is that he splits Jesus into twin brothers: Christ is the rule follower, the one that never gets into trouble and always gets his erratic brother out of trouble. Jesus, of course, is the iconoclast, the shit disturber, the one people ultimately want around.In the story Jesus is the preacher and Christ is the recorder, embellishing his teachings, editing them in order to make them more palatable. the controversial parts of the book (aside from making Jesus and Christ into two people) comes at the end, when Jesus actually dies on the cross. His resurrection is faked by having his twin brother pretend to be him. Thus, the myth is orchestrated and the path is laid for the Church to be born.In his retelling, Pullman is revisiting a much-loved theme: there is nothing wrong with spirituality - it is the church and its dogma that are evil. Christ represents the dogmas, the order, the condescending belief that people need to have their sermons pre-chewed by the bureaucratic maw of the church in order to digest Jesus's words. And Jesus is just a teacher, of the kind that commonly roamed the area expounding on points of doctrine and better living.Critique:Although I love Pullman's works for children, I did not love this book. I didn't hate it either, but my expectations with this author are pretty high. He tells the story in such a blunt, straightforward manner (reminiscent of the dry prose of the New Testament - at least the little bits of the versions that I have been subjected to), that the reader is always wondering when something is going to happen. But nothing out of the ordinary does. Now, having said that, I realise that it is supposed to be a re-telling of the story, and that he was working with the material he had. But there is something that just fell flat. Maybe it is because I have already made up my mind about the church and its dogmatism, that the message didn't seem very revolutionary, I don't know. I am sure that in some circles it will cause a great deal of kerfuffle. But not for my little, secular bunch of heathens at book club. None of us were that impressed.
  • (4/5)
    In this fantasy for adults, the author sets up a situation where Jesus was born a twin. His twin, Christ, follows him around and chronicles his activities, reporting on them to the mysterious stranger who appears at crucial moments. An interesting twist on an old story.
  • (3/5)
    A decent part of a fantastic series. Hopefully, Canongate will continue publishing them.
  • (4/5)
    This is a fascinating book. It's a retelling of the biblical story of Jesus, but with his twin brother, Christ, who acts as the primary chronicler of the life of Jesus (perhaps the Q source of biblical exegetes?).The tension which Pullman creates between facts and the "truth" to be derived from those facts is instructive for any reading of history. His contrast between passion and calculation also goes well beyond religious boundaries.Pullman is an outspoken critic of the institutional church, so perhaps his intent is to discredit the church. If so, he does it cleverly and courteously. But in fact many within the church will identify with the tensions that he creates. Thirty years ago there was a lively debate over "mission" or "maintenance", and Pullman's book would have made an interesting contribution. A very good read, whether the reader is religious or not.
  • (4/5)
    This retelling of the New Testament is spare, pared to the bone, but far from simplistic, The dualism between sacred and profane, between truth and myth, between fact and fable, between Jesus the believer and the belief, become the central parable. I expected something more radical, more daring, but in the end was satisfied it was not. The last third of this quick read is the more daring.
  • (4/5)
    It's a retelling of the story of Jesus. In this he and Christ are brothers, not one person.
  • (4/5)
    I'm a bit disappointed in Philip Pullman's The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ. Maybe that's becasue I had too high to of expectation, maybe that's becuase I constantly compared the book to Pullman's other, highly-regarded series His Dark Materials, or maybe that's becasue I thought it would be mroe than what it was. No matter the reason for a slight disappiontment, Pullman's writing was a good as ever. The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel takes the story of Jesus from the Bible and adds a twist: Jesus was the good guy, much like the Bible says he was, but he has a twin brother, Christ, who-- like the title suggests-- is a scoundrel and gets into trouble. This book, unlike His Dark Materials, won't offend Christians becuase all of the material in this book comes from the Bible.
  • (2/5)
    "This is a story." proclaims the back of the book, leaving the Reader in no doubt that the Author wants to make this clear and possibly in anticipation of reaction to the book. The book quickly establishes that this is "the story of Jesus and his brother Christ" and even before we learn that these brothers are twins, the title has already suggested to me that we may be in "evil twin" territory. Sadly the book does not develop well enough to support my first impressions and it becomes, quite simply, a retelling of a well known story and of possibly lesser known Gospels. I very nearly stopped reading at the end of the first short chapter. I felt as if I should be reading this aloud to a child. And, whilst there are some big words and bigger issues as the story progresses, I am still left feeling that I have been patronised. The style is simplistic. Maybe the Author intends to provoke our own thoughts, but he promised me a story and I feel as if I have been short changed. If I had no knowledge of the Bible at all I would have been left totally bewildered as to what this story was about. It is a story and has the makings of a good one but it is not well-rounded and I am left feeling as if I have read a synopsis.
  • (3/5)
    Other reviewers have commented on Pullman's atheism - I thought he left quite a lot of room for God, even if it is a God with no concern about his creation or at least no interest in human-kind. The author can't, of course, accept the virgin birth, miracles or the resurrection so knocks the props from under Christianity despite approving Jesus' attitudes, teaching and integrity. His main dislike is for established religion, a creation of imperfect, if not greedy and power-hungry mortals.Pullman's explanations of the supernatural are neat, if not particularly original, and Christ is given the responsibility for writing up the history to ensure that Jesus' story will last through the ages. The one enigmatic character is the commissioner of the history who is never named: he visits Christ regularly and guides him in the manner of manipulation of the truth. This commissioner might have been one of the Sanhedrin but, if one didn't know better, he might have been intended to be Satan.
  • (4/5)
    I've read a number of retellings of the central Christian story recently: C K Stead wrote a fascinating and surprisingly faithful (irony intended) secular retelling from the eyes of Judas Hiscariot; I was fortunate enough to attend a performance of the famous, once-in-a-decade Oberammergau Passion Play in Bavaria, and now I've stumbled over the famously atheist Philip Pullman's take - which involves a fair bit more licence than Stead's but is otherwise of a similar demystifying disposition: rationalising miracles into ordinary materialistic phenomena, and rebasing Jesus from mystic to idealistic, but nonetheless political, historical figure. Pullman's licence is to pull Jesus Christ apart into two figures: Jesus (an idealist if naive populist) and Christ, his twin, a more introverted, but more intelligent, dark inversion. Curiously, the Passion Play - which is entirely reverend to orthodox Christian doctrine in a way that Stead's and Pullman's works are not - also de-emphasises the spiritual in favour of the political machinations of the Sanhedrin and the political dimension of Christ's mission. All three, in some way, accordingly miss what's so special and clever about the passion. But we live in rational times - or so we like our chroniclers to tell us. All three also bring the character of Judas into sharp relief: Stead and Oberammergau by his prominence, Pullman by his notable absence. The thing is, unless read purely as a pantomime villain, Judas is the not only the central driver of the passion's narrative, but also the most interesting and recognisably human character of the lot: he means well, but is naivety/stupidity/vanity/self importance (delete as applicable) lets him down. His is the character arc which gives us lessons: if this were a Shakespearian Tragedy he would be the lead: a complex, brooding anti-hero in the vein of Macbeth. Jesus, by contrast, is a rather cardboard cut-out good guy not unlike the fated Duncan: At key points in the drama, Christ remains passive and stays pointedly silent. By contrast Judas agonises, soliloquises, and, for better or ill, acts. While Judas is not represented by name here, his actions are, and it is telling how Pullman has re-designed the whole myth to accommodate them (it would spoil it to say more: you'll have to read the book to see what I mean). Much of Pullman's industry is to illustrate that there is no such thing as truth other than the compelling story contextualised and carved out of events which, in their unfinished natural state, don't have a moral or didactic dimension. Jesus provides the unshaped events, Christ the chronicle. Christ is, by turns, appalled by and drawn to the power he derives from his narrative talent. This brief book is written stylishly and evenly in Pullman's curt and economical prose. He might seem a controversial choice to retell this particular story, yet despite his inventions Philip Pullman generally does not let his atheism get in the way of the thrust of Jesus' central message. Indeed, as a storyteller of the first order, you wonder whether he doesn't see a little of the tragic scoundrel Christ in himself. If you like this, try C.K. Stead: My Name Was Judas
  • (4/5)
    An interesting reworking of a bible story! It will absolutely offend some, and I would say to anyone with faith not to read it. I, however, enjoyed it. As always, Pullman's story-telling is wonderful.