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Walk Two Moons

Walk Two Moons

Written by Sharon Creech

Narrated by Mary Stuart Masterson


Walk Two Moons

Written by Sharon Creech

Narrated by Mary Stuart Masterson

ratings:
4.5/5 (98 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Publisher:
Released:
May 17, 2005
ISBN:
9780060859428
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Gramps says that I am a country girl at heart, and that is true.

Thirteen-year-old Salamanca Tree Hiddle, proud of her country roots and the "Indian-ness in her blood," travels from Ohio to Idaho with her eccentric grandparents. Along the way, she tells them of the story of Phoebe Winterbottom, who received mysterious messages, who met a "potential lunatic," and whose mother disappeared.

Beneath Phoebe's stories Salamanca's own story and that of her mother, who left on April morning for Idaho, promising to return before the tulips bloomed. Sal's mother has not, however, returned, and the trip to Idaho takes on a growing urgency as Salamanca hopes to get to Idaho in time for her mother's birthday and bring her back, despite her father's warning that she is fishing in the air.

This richly layered novel is in turn funny, mysterious, and touching. Sharon Creech's original voice tells a story like no other, one that readers will not soon forget.

Winner of the 1995Newbery Medal

A 1995 ALA Notable Children's Book
School Library Journal Best Book of 1994
Winner of a 1994 Bulletin Blue Ribbon
A Notable Children's Trade Book in the Language Arts (NCTE)
Winner of the 1997 Heartland Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature

On her long car trip from Ohio to Idaho, 13-year-old Salamanca Hiddle tells her grandparents the story of her friend Phoebe, who receives a message from a "lunatic" and who must cope with the disappearance of her mother. But beneath this story is Sal's own story, and that of her mother, who left home one day and never returned.

Winner, 1995 Newbery Medal
Notable Children's Books of 1995 (ALA)
1995 Notable Trade Books in the Language Arts (NCTE)
Children's Book Award for Longer Novels (Great Britain's Federation of Children's Books Groups)
Outstanding Books of 1994 for Middle School-Aged Teens (V)
Best Books 1994 (SLJ)
Bulletin Blue Ribbon Books 1994 (C)

Publisher:
Released:
May 17, 2005
ISBN:
9780060859428
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Sharon Creech has written twenty-one books for young people and is published in over twenty languages. Her books have received awards in both the U.S. and abroad, including the Newbery Medal for Walk Two Moons, the Newbery Honor for The Wanderer, and Great Britain’s Carnegie Medal for Ruby Holler. Before beginning her writing career, Sharon Creech taught English for fifteen years in England and Switzerland. She and her husband now live in Maine, “lured there by our grandchildren,” Creech says. www.sharoncreech.com



Reviews

What people think about Walk Two Moons

4.4
98 ratings / 127 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    I wish I had found Walk Two Moons when it first came out. In fact, I wish it had been on my reading list in school because I know I would have eaten it up. I know this because, despite my current age, I still fell deeply in love with this book. It's ageless, and it's wonderful.

    Salamanca Tree Hiddle (Sal)is a thirteen year old narrator who will steal your heart. We embark on a car trip with Sal and her eccentric grandparents, all the while learning bits about their lives, her life, and the life of her best friend Phoebe. Let me please tell you how much I loved each and every character in this book. Sal is sweet, kind and witty far beyond what her age dictates. Her grandparents are the picture of what true love really is. Even Phoebe, the girl who worries about everything, fits perfectly in the story. There is everything to love in Creech's characters and they make the story come to life.

    Sharon Creech weaves the stories of Sal and Phoebe into a story that took my breath away. A story that is funny, honest, and at times so heartbreaking that you'll find yourself teary eyed. During the car trip Sal's thoughts take the reader on a journey through her innermost self. I adored watching her grow, make observations, and just become even more amazing. I'm not even certain I'm making sense at this point. That's how much Walk Two Moons threw me off. It's beautiful.

    This is a must read for people of all ages, but I definitely suggest you put it in the hands of your middle grade reader as soon as possible. Young readers will learn from, and walk with Sal. Older readers will get the chance to revisit some of those hidden feelings we hide. The raw ones that we push down as we grow up. It's a wonderful, and terrifying, feeling all at the same time. In my opinion, Walk Two Moons is a book that will make a reader out of a non-reader. I sincerely hope you love it as much as I did.
  • (4/5)
    Good children’s book
  • (5/5)
    This is the story of a twelve-year-old girl coming to terms with the absence of her mom. It’s told in two parallel narratives. One is in present-time, on a road trip with her grandparents. The other is the story she tells to her grandparents that involve her mom and what happened with her and her dad after she left.The classic trifecta ensues: 1) they move somewhere she doesn’t like 2) Dad starts seeing another woman 3) No one in school likes her. In the process, she befriends another girl, and HER mother leaves. This is the interesting part, as our main character gets a taste of what a pill she was, having to console someone in the same situation.It’s a good story, especially if you know what a broken home is like. And the style, full of odd quaint country expressions and quirky humor. It’s not a cheesy Hallmark story. It reminds me of “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian” by Sherman Alexie or “Holes” by Louis Sachar or “I Am the Cheese” by Robert Cormier. All of these have an unreliable narrator and implication of something sinister going on below the surface.
  • (5/5)
    Pandora’s Box provides a nice analogy for present-day life in Sharon Creech’s Walk Two Moons. Why would Pandora open the box? Why would hope be left inside? And what would be found at the bottom of a box of good things?Sal’s mother is absent. Her father moves her away from their home, making her go to a new school, where her new best friend is suddenly missing her mother too. All this is in the story Sal tells her grandparents as they take her on a road trip, as the three strands of Walk Two Moons weave beautifully together. Simple language illuminates complex topics, offering a convincingly childish point of view, with very natural avoidance of the true, and pleasing persistence of imagination. Maybe a lunatic stole the mother. Maybe the neighbor killed her husband and buried him in the yard. Maybe…Or maybe life falls inevitably into the realm of Pandora’s box. With hope at the bottom, lifting both reader and characters to safety. Walk Two Moons invites adult readers to walk in the shoes of children, while simultaneously inviting children to walk in the shoes of their parents. Truth is hidden between the imaginations, and truth hurts. But hope will save.Written for children, best for mature readers (5th grade up?), and for readers who choose to think, Walk Two Moons is the sort of novel that just might invite a child to see through different eyes and find their own hope waiting. Coming of age, coming to wisdom, and coming in hope… Highly recommended.Disclosure: It came highly recommended and it was a birthday present.
  • (5/5)
    13 year old Salamanca Tree Hiddle's mother left home mysteriously, and eventually, even though Salamanca knows where she is, knows she will not come back.Her eccentric grandparents take her on trip across country to see her mother, and along the way, she tells them the story of her friendship with Phoebe... a girl whose mother also left her mysteriously without explanation.A beautiful story (two stories actually) with several surprises in the last few chapters. The tears were so thick in my eyes the last couple of chapters I had trouble reading them.
  • (5/5)
    Salamanca and her grandparents are on a road trip retracing the steps of her mother. While they drive, Sal tells them the story of her friend Phoebe, and in telling her story we learn her and her mother's, and why her mother left.I had forgotten just about everything about this story other than the fact that I enjoyed this and other works by the author some years ago. This one was a well-deserved Newbery award winner that unfolds its mysteries deliberately and explores the idea that you can't make snap judgments about others but should try to see and understand their points of view.