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The Overton Window

The Overton Window

Written by Glenn Beck

Narrated by James Daniels


The Overton Window

Written by Glenn Beck

Narrated by James Daniels

ratings:
4/5 (21 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Released:
Jun 15, 2010
ISBN:
9781442305250
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

From the New York Times #1 bestselling author of The Christmas Sweater , An Inconvenient Book , Common Sense , and Arguing with Idiots comes a heart-stopping new thriller about the consequences America will soon face if we continue to take our freedoms for granted.

Meet Noah Gardner, a twenty-something public relations executive who seems to have all the makings of a killer eHarmony profile. He's smart, handsome, well educated and, like many in the younger generation, far more concerned about the future of his social life than the future of his country.

But that all changes when Noah meets Molly Ross, a mailroom worker at his company who is consumed by the thought that the America we know is about to be lost forever. Noah doesn't believe much in conspiracy theories, or care much about the day-to-day happenings in Washington, but as events begin to unfold exactly the way Molly predicted, Noah becomes increasingly suspicious.

As the two ruling political parties do their best to keep Americans divided and distracted, a historic terrorist attack shakes the country to its core. As those around him panic, Noah realizes that a master plan to transform America is rapidly unfolding. Exposing that plan, and revealing the conspirators behind it, is the only way to save both the country and woman that he loves.

Seamlessly weaving together American history, frightening facts about America's present condition, and a fast-placed plot, Glenn's new thriller will educate, enlighten, and, most importantly, entertain his fans in a whole new way.
Released:
Jun 15, 2010
ISBN:
9781442305250
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Glenn Beck, the nationally syndicated radio host and founder of TheBlaze television network, has written thirteen #1 bestselling books and is one of the few authors in history to have had #1 national bestsellers in the fiction, nonfiction, self-help, and children’s picture book genres. His recent fiction works include the thrillers Agenda 21, The Overton Window, and its sequel, The Eye of Moloch; his many nonfiction titles include Conform, Miracles and Massacres, Control, and Being George Washington. For more information about Glenn Beck, his books, and TheBlaze television network, visit GlennBeck.com and TheBlaze.com.


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Reviews

What people think about The Overton Window

4.0
21 ratings / 14 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Mr. Beck's second fiction book was good, but not as good as I suspected it would be (based on where I thought he was going). It was still good and he keeps you engaged enough to flow through the book. His concept presented in this book is right on with the way our political system (and more so, how those in powerful places within our world are taking us). Recommend. ***May 20, 2012***
  • (5/5)
    What can I say? I couldn't put this book down. I hear that is a sequel coming this year. I can't wait. The thing is , all this could and most probably is happening now. It makes you wonder about every thing you see and hear about. It sure opened my eyes as to how we are lulled into a false sense of reality. Highly reccommend it.
  • (1/5)
    Unfortunately, I could not get into the book. It was actually slow moving from first page to last and I struggled to finish it thinking it might get better. To be honest, since it was boring reading to me, I kind of lost what the whole premise was all about, so if anyone at LibraryThing has read this, please let me know what I missed. :(
  • (4/5)
    I just finished this book, and, to tell you the truth, I'm not quite sure how to rate it.It's the type of book that makes you think and consider the possibilities; unfortunately, the possibilities offered in this book are frightening.What if some of the known horrendous events that have happened in this country had been orchestrated with an ulterior purpose in mind? What if a power group had arranged some events to ultimately have the public think the way they want them to think, react the way they want them to react?Although this book is fiction, many of the references are based in fact and the combination is riveting.When Noah, a young man associated with one of the most powerful public relations firms in the country meets Molly, an idealistic believer in the power of the people, the result is a story that is shocking in its believability.A good read.
  • (4/5)
    Pretty good, a little predictable. Pretty prescient, considering it was written a few years ago, but many topics applied to current events.
  • (4/5)
    Another freighting book of what the future could be. How easy it would be to topple our government while the country livse in a "I don't know, I don't care" attitude.Freedom is prescious and fragile the only way the constitution to work is for the citizens not the politicans to remain on watch for those wanting to take our freedom away.
  • (3/5)
    Beck's conspiracy thriller started with enough potential to become a series of books but a 100 pages in I realized that it was still too deep in development to wrap up well. Rather than building this into a series and leaving us hanging, Beck wraps it up, rather unsatisfactorily in the last 100 pages. In short, it's a quick start and then a fizzle.
  • (4/5)
    “The Overton Window” will be a big disappointment to mainstream critics: It’s actually pretty good.Too often, political tracts in the form of a novel can be stultifying. Henry Hazlitt tried it and, while his economic ideas were, of course, right on, his attempt at a novel was a failure, as even he realized. (“The Great Idea” or “Time Will Run Back” is still worth reading, though, if only for the novelty.)Mr. Beck’s though, is a pretty exciting story, suspense and crime set within a period that ominously parallels our own – in fact, pretty much is our own.Mr. Beck frequently disparages his own intellect, but the fact is he reads voraciously. His title comes from this idea, as spelled out in Wikipedia:The Overton window, in political theory, describes a "window" in the range of public reactions to ideas in public discourse, in a spectrum of all possible options on a particular issue. It is named after its originator, Joseph P. Overton, former vice president of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy.Mackinac Center, by the way, is a freedom-oriented think tank.Anyway, Glenn Beck creates a revolutionary movement within an increasingly oppressive nation-state and, along the way, discusses ideas and history.In fact, his last chapter is an “Afterword” in which he lists actual people, actual quotes and publications of the past, and draws the lines that, at least in his opinion, connect them all.From Threshold Editions – Mercury Radio Arts, division of Simon & Schuster, Inc., 2010.Highly recommended.
  • (1/5)
    I'm a liberal, and I think that Glenn Beck is a complete charlatan. But that doesn't mean that I wasn't willing to give this "novel" a fair chance; I tried my very best to go into this book with as few preconceived notions as possible.And in the end, this is a horrible read. I'm not saying that because it doesn't mesh with my politics (or reality). I'm saying that because, in spite of being billed as a "thriller," there is no suspense. Reading this book was like slogging through molasses. Nothing is pushing the plot forward. This is probably the most boring book I've read all year.The characters are wooden and incredibly two-dimensional, and they were prone to monologuing for entire chapters. Seriously. This "novel" was more like several speeches strung together with a bare minimum of plot. I won't even start on the grammar mistakes. Has the semi-colon become extinct? Are comma splices the newest rage? This book was a complete waste of time for me. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. I'm just glad that I didn't waste any money buying it!
  • (4/5)
    First the government concocts a plan on where to lead the people. Then it formulates a strategy on how to enact such a farfetched scheme. Enter the Overton Window. Slowly move a previously unacceptable process into an accepted way of life. Let me give you a simple example, before 2001, in depth random searches of both belongings and body would not have been tolerated. Enter the events on 9/11 and now it is an accepted practice.The Overton Window uses some creative license to get its point across, but Beck paints a very vivid picture of his view on what our government is doing behind the scenes. At the end of the book (story) he devotes a chapter to his source material and challenges his readers to look into it in greater detail for themselves. An entertaining read, especially for the conspiracy theorists among us.
  • (4/5)
    A scary book, which rings true, somewhat like 1984, but not the greatest writing -- but it will scare the pants off of you! A plan to destroy America, a hundred years in the making, is about to be unleashed . . . can it be stopped?There is a powerful technique called the Overton Window that can shape our lives, our laws, and our future. It works by manipulating public perception so that ideas previously thought of as radical begin to seem acceptable over time. Move the Window and you change the debate. Change the debate and you change the country. For Noah Gardner, a twentysomething public relations executive, it's safe to say that political theory is the furthest thing from his mind. Smart, single, handsome, and insulated from the world's problems by the wealth and power of his father, Noah is far more concerned about the future of his social life than the future of his country. But all of that changes when Noah meets Molly Ross, a woman who is consumed by the knowledge that the America we know is about to be lost forever. She and her group of patriots have vowed to remember the past and fight for the future--but Noah, convinced they're just misguided conspiracy-theorists, isn't interested in lending his considerable skills to their cause. And then the world changes. An unprecedented attack on U.S. soil shakes the country to the core and puts into motion a frightening plan, decades in the making, to transform America and demonize all those who stand in the way. Amidst the chaos, many don't know the difference between conspiracy theory and conspiracy fact--or, more important, which side to fight for. But for Noah, the choice is clear: Exposing the plan, and revealing the conspirators behind it, is the only way to save both the woman he loves and the individual freedoms he once took for granted.
  • (5/5)
    An excellent book which builds on reality and fact and takes logical and possible steps forward in a cautionary tale of what can happen when you stop paying attention to your government.
  • (5/5)
    This is one big ole fact/fiction story. I like the story line and the way the author pulled it all together. I also like the way Mr.Beck sites his sources in the back of the book and shows the difference from fact and rumor. I did find the build up at the beginning a bit slow but once the story started moving it kept me interested. I would recomend this book.
  • (4/5)
    Glenn Beck is a remarkable radio and TV personality but is difficult to classify. He has been embarked on a campaign to educate and disseminate the period and the views of America’s founders. The “Overton Window” is his attempt to bring this campaign to another media. He both succeeds and fails at this effort.The tale itself is a mystery, a love story, a history, a revolution, and an education. One hero, a public relations practitioner, moves from his world of apolitical and highest payer ‘spin’ to a world of revolutionaries by following and falling for a girl. We follow him through events and through his education. The only way to evaluate the book is to look at the different parts of the author’s campaign as presented.As a mystery it is a moderate success, a page turner with surprises. As a love story it is a failure. As a history the “Overton Window” is somewhat confusing. Beck does introduce some of the ideas of America’s founding, and couples those ideas with current events, Tea Party activists, Homeland Security, and new laws. He must select from this broad range those elements that support the mystery, but the selection is a hit and miss success. The revolution is to be continued.As an education, the book is also spotty. Beck has some elements of “Atlas Shrugged” as his protagonist goes introspective and attempts to establish in his own mind where he stands. He goes into some detail, but Beck tries to accomplish in ten pages what required a hundred for Ayn Rand. You can learn some things by careful attention, but no overwhelming reasoning seems likely to create a generation of fans. You do learn the meaning and use of the ‘Overton Window’ used to describe the politically possible.In a somewhat unique feature, Beck gives us a 28 page ‘Afterword’ pointing out where some of his elements connect to history, politics, and current events. This may be as valuable as the rest of the book.Now for the hard part… will you like the book? If you are already a Beck fan, you will absolutely enjoy the read and the ride; if you strongly oppose him, you will probably consider it ridiculous. If you are drawn to the Tea Parties, the partial education makes this a worthwhile read. And if you support the growth of government, you may still learn something of your opposition by reading the “Overton Window”.