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The Glory of Their Times: The Story of the Early Days of Baseball Told by the Men Who Played It

The Glory of Their Times: The Story of the Early Days of Baseball Told by the Men Who Played It


The Glory of Their Times: The Story of the Early Days of Baseball Told by the Men Who Played It

ratings:
4/5 (119 ratings)
Length:
4 hours
Released:
Mar 4, 2008
ISBN:
9781598872224
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

Description

"Oh, the game was very different in my day from what it's like today. I don't mean just that the fences were further back and the ball was deader and things like that. I mean it was more fun to play ball then."—Davy Jones

First published in 1966, The Glory of Their Times is a universally hailed classic. It's a delightfully evocative work full of fascinating characters and wonderful anecdotes about immortals like Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and many others.

This is also the story of author Lawrence S. Ritter's six year quest to find the heroes of a bygone era. He interviewed more than two dozen players from the turn of the century and the decades shortly thereafter, including many now in the Baseball Hall of Fame, then let them tell their own stories, in their own words. The scorecard includes Rube Marquard, Chief Meyers, Goose Goslin, Smoky Joe Wood, Wahoo Sam Crawford, and many more. This new audio compilation of the original interviews is great news for baseball fans and anyone who loves old-time tales of America's national pastime.

Released:
Mar 4, 2008
ISBN:
9781598872224
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Lawrence S. Ritter (1922-2004) was chairman of the Department of Finance at the Graduate School of Business Administration of New York University. He collaborated with fellow baseball historian Donald Honig on The Image of Their Greatness and The 100 Greatest Baseball Players of All Time but is best known for The Glory of Their Times, one of the most famous sports books ever published.



Reviews

What people think about The Glory of Their Times

4.1
119 ratings / 8 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    The classic, hardly-to-be-bettered oral history of baseball, and a longtime favourite among lovers of the sport. Essential to have on your bookshelf if you do love baseball.
  • (4/5)
    After reading this and watching the Kevin Costner documentary "Fastball" I've been convinced of two things. First, that the very best of the early ballplayers could certainly play in the modern era, although they wouldn't be considered as unique now as they were back then. For example, Walter Johnson would be considered a hard thrower now, but one of several instead of the one and only. And second, seemingly everyone was in attendance or participated in the 1912 World Series between the Giants and Red Sox. When I get my DeLorean finished, that's the first place I'm headed.
  • (5/5)
    This is a collection of first person accounts from players who played from the turn of the twentieth century through its fourth decade. Their stories are riveting, endearing, and enlightening. This is a great book.
  • (5/5)
    I just finished this book and I am going to listen to it again right away. It is that special. Nothing better than listening to the old timers talk about the sport they love.
  • (5/5)
    I've sat here for close to 10 minutes writing and rewriting things, trying to think of something new or interesting that I could possibly say about this book, and I just can't do it. If you have any interest in the early days of baseball at all, buy this book ASAP (it's not terribly expensive) and relive the stories through their eyes. This is considered canonical baseball literature for a reason.
  • (4/5)
    The author interviews players that were around when baseball was just beginning to become a professional sport. There weren't that many still alive, so the ones he interviews were lesser known players. They still share some fascinating stories.This is definitely a book for those who enjoy the deeply personal part of the early days of baseball. Not a lot of gossip or strategy. Just some stories of what men did to play the game they love, and what life was like on a ball team.