Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
Caesar's Women

Caesar's Women

Written by Colleen McCullough

Narrated by Michael York


Caesar's Women

Written by Colleen McCullough

Narrated by Michael York

ratings:
4/5 (12 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Released:
Feb 1, 1996
ISBN:
9780743542487
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

New York Times best-selling author Colleen McCullough re-creates an extraordinary epoch before the mighty Republic belonged to Julius Caesar when Rome's noblewomen were his greatest conquest.

His victories were legend in battle and bedchamber alike. Love was a political weapon he wielded cunningly and ruthlessly in his private war against enemies in the forum. Genius, general, patrician, Gaius Julius Caesar was history. His wives bought him influence. He sacrificed his beloved daughter on the altar of ambition. He burned for the cold-hearted mistress he could never dare trust. Caesar's women all knew and feared his power. He adored them, used them, destroyed them on his irresistible rise to prominence. And one of them would seal his fate.

A Simon & Schuster audio production.

Released:
Feb 1, 1996
ISBN:
9780743542487
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Colleen McCullough, a native of Australia, established the department of neurophysiology at the Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney before working as a researcher at Yale Medical School for ten years. She is the bestselling author of numerous novels, including The Thorn Birds, and lives with her husband on Norfolk Island in the South Pacific.


Related to Caesar's Women

Related Audiobooks
Related Articles

Reviews

What people think about Caesar's Women

3.8
12 ratings / 11 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    This was really a good book ... I wish I'd read it in the right order ... now I feel like I need to go back and re-read Caesar. Oh well. I like the domestic side and the political intrigues better than I like the battle stuff so this one was for me. I just wish they were shorter!!!
  • (4/5)
    I liked this one a bit less than the earlier books in the series. This is actually the fourth book in the Master of Rome series. Earlier ones focused on key predecessors to Caesar in the late Roman Republic--Marius and Sulla. This is the first book then where Julius Caesar dominates the narrative.I don't think McCullough's books shine because of her prose. Some complain the books are ponderous, the prose pedestrian, and I think there's justice in that. She's not a strong stylist such as Robert Graves or Mary Renault. But what I did love in the Master of Rome series is how well she conjures up the late Roman Republic, from the at times alien mindset to things where it's easy to to see modern parallels such as in the Roman Senate, to the surprisingly cosmopolitan insula (tenement). My main problem in the later books is, like with Renault and Alexander the Great, McCullough obviously hero worships Caesar. It's not just his depiction alone. I have a friend who is a classicist, and her take on Caesar is that "he's awesome." As written by McCullough Caesar is extremely gifted and a charmer. I think my problem is that every other character is put through the Caesar prism. McCullough's Cicero, for instance, is far from admirable. (Although again, my classicist friend would actually agree on that.) But it seems as if everyone opposed to Caesar in this story is a tool or an envious fool.As for Caesar's women, I don't know that I feel they're all that front and central here in a way that justifies the title. Certainly Caesar's mother, Aurelia, is among the most modern in feel, the strongest female character, and the most admirable. Servilia, one of Caesar's mistresses, is abominable, but fun to read. One of those characters you almost love to hate, and when I think of this book, among the scenes I find absolutely the most memorable is her crucifixion of a slave. So, very much still worth the read, but for me Caesar is beginning to wear out his welcome.
  • (1/5)
    I really enjoyed McCullough's obviously extensive research, but I was disappointed at her writing style. I couldn't finish the book because she was constantly switching perspective, lecturing, and generally using writing techniques poorly. Not going to be one I recommend to others, despite the fact that I'm dying to read more books set in the Subura!
  • (4/5)
    Book four in the Masters of Rome series, this book most closely resembles the HBO series "Rome". While it touches uponthe key players in the final years of the Roman Republic, it also spends a lot of time on the women behind the scenes.
  • (5/5)
    It's a coin toss as to which is my favorite in the Masters of Rome series, Caesar's Women or The First Man in Rome.

    The women referred to in the title are not just Caesar's wives or lovers. It also refers to his mother, who was one of the most important influences in his life, his daughter, Julia, and even the Vestal Virgins that were in his care as Pontifex Maximus. It's a great look into the lives of the upper class women and a thoroughly interesting read. Unlike the major male players, less is known about the women so McCullough can have a lot more license regarding their personalities.

    I love this series more for its portrait of everyday life more than the interesting story of how Rome began to move away from its republican beginnings.
  • (4/5)
    First class research, first class recreation of an alien culture. Her Caesar is a super-man, whose passions, intellect and temperament are quite unbelievable. She describes him as possessing terrific charm, and her character does possess that charm, so that you do believe in him, and sympathize with him, and cheer for him.
  • (3/5)
    Plot: Like the second half of Fortune's Favourites, this book suffers from being set in a time where no long-term events were taking place. The story deals with minor events that each take up a hundred pages at most, with connections between them sometimes tenuous. The narration picks up towards the end when the triumvirate forms, but before that it has a tendency to get lost in subplots. Characters: Caesar is turning out a touch too perfect and just isn't believable. Crassus and Pompeius are great and well drawn, as are some of the adversaries. The women suffer when it comes to characterization, and tend to come out a lot less interesting than the men. Style: The text feels slow. It's easier to get through than the previous volumes since the political maneuvering is not as complex, but the writing itself slows things down. Plus: Pompeius' characterization. The Catiline Conspiracy gets the attention it deserves. Minus: Servilia is so overdone as a harpy, she's painful to watch. Summary: As solidly researched as all the others, but this one lacks political events to fill the pages, so domestic affairs take up some of the space.
  • (3/5)
    Julius Caesar's life in Rome around the year of his consulship before he left for Gaul. Every single piece of legislation chronicled, every single name mentioned anywhere in the contemp. texts brought in. Very long and yet full of interesting info about Roman life and society of the time. good glossary of terms at end. Not particularly fond of her style. This is ok, but not lit.
  • (5/5)
    Probably my favourite historical fiction series. Really meaty and engrossing.
  • (3/5)
    The tone of this novel was very different from the others in the series. While it was filled with lots of political intrigue and schemes, it was tempered by homey touches of domesticity. Caesar’s women don’t really matter to him except to help hold up his dignitas. He feels a great duty to each of them in their respective little pigeonholes. The political machinations are unreal and Caesar is a bit too much of a Superman through them all. Even in his defeats he finds some way to triumph over his enemies.
  • (5/5)
    Ms. McCullough's whole "Rome" series is great, but this one is my favorite.