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Under The Volcano

Under The Volcano

Written by Malcolm Lowry

Narrated by Christopher Cazenove


Under The Volcano

Written by Malcolm Lowry

Narrated by Christopher Cazenove

ratings:
4/5 (8 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781601365484
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

The horrors of alcoholism have never been so vividly, so comprehensively, or so sympathetically described as they are in Under the Volcano. Equally vivid is the picture of alcohol's attractions: the blessed painlessness that beckons from within the bottle. Against a backcloth, brilliantly described, of the magnificent, uncaring Mexican mountains, the Consul examines his disastrous life; he understands the pain he is causing to all who love him; he is aware that salvation is within his grasp; and yet he cannot save himself; he does not want to save himself...
Publisher:
Released:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781601365484
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Malcolm Lowry (1909–1957) was a British novelist and poet whose masterpiece Under the Volcano is widely hailed as one of the greatest novels of the twentieth century. Born near Liverpool, England, Lowry grew up in a prominent, wealthy family and chafed under the expectations placed upon him by parents and boarding school. He wrote passionately on the themes of exile and despair, and his own wanderlust and erratic lifestyle made him an icon to later generations of writers. 


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3.8
8 ratings / 4 Reviews
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  • (4/5)
    Stories:- Rumpole à la Carte- Rumpole and the Summer of Discontent- Rumpole and the Right to Silence- Rumpole at Sea- Rumpole and the Quacks- Rumpole and the Prosecution
  • (3/5)
    Another selection of stories recounted by the enduring and endearing Horace Rumpole, barrister at law (or Old Bailey hack), about the trials and tribulations of life in Equity Court.This was an odd selection. The first story, which gives the volume its title, is one of the strongest in the whole Rumpole canon, but I felt that a couple of the others showed signs of being slightly formulaic. By the time this selection was published, Rumpole of the Bailey had become established as a successful television series, and these stories came into being initially as television scripts, being adapted for book form subsequently (presumably to milk the Rump0ole cash cow as far as possible). They are still entertaining, but with the exception of the first story, some of the gilt had definitely come off the gingerbread.The final story in the selection is notable for representing the first, and possibly only, time that Rumpole was persuaded to act for the prosecution, although the circumstances are far from normal – the case being a private prosecution, rather than one brought by the crown – and he clearly finds it difficult to lay down the principles of a lifetime of defending.
  • (5/5)
    Sitting down with a Rumpole story is like putting on your favourite jammies, grabbing a cup of hot cocoa and sitting in front of the telly with a smart English comedy. It's comfortable and entertaining at the same time. Horace Rumpole is one of a kind, more's the pity. In the title story he is told he is a character and I have to agree.I think my favourite story is "Rumpole at Sea" even though he strays far from Equity Court on a second honeymoon cruise with She Who Must Be Obeyed. Needless to say, the cruise was Hilda's idea. Rumpole is not the sea-going or even the vacationing type. Having been forced on the cruise, however, he is dismayed to see Mr. Justice Graves also on the same cruise and he attempts to avoid him. But the ship is small and eventually they are thrown together. Also in their little group is a successful mystery writer, his executive assistant, a newly ordained clergyman and his wife. When the wife mysteriously disappears the mystery writer and the judge suspect the worst i.e. that the padre has done away with her at sea. Rumpole leaps to his defence of course and, in doing so, puts the learned justice in his debt.The British system of justice is sufficiently different from the Canadian system that some of the customs are puzzling. The difference between solicitors and barristers is one such custom. Solicitors do not appear in court but they do represent accused persons and find barristers to do the court work. Solicitors also do the humdrum (but lucrative) paperwork for conveyancing and wills and so on. Here in Canada lawyers are both solicitors and barristers so the same person who draws up your will might defend you in court on a drunk driving charge. Hard to say which system is preferable. I'm pretty sure that a character like Rumpole's couldn't exist with having to examine the minutiae of a contract though so it's a good thing Britain has clung to their system.
  • (4/5)
    I'm coming to very much enjoy these stories of Horace Rumpole, the curmudgeonly English defence barrister who plies his trade in the Old Bailey, whose greatest weapon in court is Reasonable Doubt, thrives on his Pommeroy's Chateau and steak and kidney pudding, and fears only the indomitable will of Hilda Rumpole, or "She Who Must Be Obeyed". This is a delicious set of six Rumpole stories, one or two of which actually show Rumpole exhibiting traces of idealistic courage. "Rumpole and the Right to Silence" show Rumpole's determination to win the case for his accused client who is exercising his right to silence, even to Rumpole himself. "Rumpole at Sea" is a delightful bit of tomfoolery on a cruise, highlighting Rumpole's dedication to the premises of "Innocent Until Proven Guilty" and "Reasonable Doubt". My favorite, "Rumpole for the Prosecution", has Rumpole for once in his life taking on a much-needed lucrative case in which he is, for the first time, the prosecutor -- and then finding himself unable to suppress his defense attorney instincts when he becomes aware that the accused may well be innocent, and his opposing barrister is doing nothing to suggest this in court. Rumpole has become one of the most intriguing characters I've run across in fiction, and this is a fine collection.