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The Cold Moon: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel

The Cold Moon: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel

Written by Jeffery Deaver

Narrated by Joe Mantegna


The Cold Moon: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel

Written by Jeffery Deaver

Narrated by Joe Mantegna

ratings:
3.5/5 (21 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Released:
Jun 1, 2006
ISBN:
9780743564571
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Lincoln Rhyme returns in a heart stopping new thriller from the author of The Twelfth Card

On a freezing December night, with a full moon hovering in the black sky over New York City, two people are brutally murdered -- the death scenes marked by eerie, matching calling cards: moon-faced clocks investigators fear ticked away the victims' last moments on earth. Renowned criminologist Lincoln Rhyme immediately identifies the clock distributor and has the chilling realization that the killer -- who has dubbed himself the Watchmaker -- has more murders planned in the hours to come.

Rhyme, a quadriplegic long confined to his wheelchair, immediately taps his trusted partner and longtime love, Amelia Sachs, to walk the grid and be his eyes and ears on the street. But Sachs has other commitments now -- namely, her first assignment as lead detective on a homicide of her own. As she struggles to balance her pursuit of the infuriatingly elusive Watchmaker with her own case, Sachs unearths shocking revelations about the police force that threaten to undermine her career, her sense of self and her relationship with Rhyme. As the Rhyme-Sachs team shows evidence of fissures, the Watchmaker is methodically stalking his victims and planning a diabolical criminal masterwork....Indeed, the Watchmaker may be the most cunning and mesmerizing villain Rhyme and Sachs have ever encountered.
Released:
Jun 1, 2006
ISBN:
9780743564571
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Jeffery Deaver is the #1 international bestselling author of more than forty novels, three collections of short stories, and a nonfiction law book. His books are sold in 150 countries and translated into 25 languages. His first novel featuring Lincoln Rhyme, The Bone Collector, was made into a major motion picture starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie, and a hit television series on NBC.  He’s received or been shortlisted for a number of awards around the world, including Novel of the Year by the International Thriller Writers and the Steel Dagger from the Crime Writers' Association in the United Kingdom. In 2014, he was the recipient of three lifetime achievement awards. A former journalist, folksinger, and attorney, he was born outside of Chicago and has a bachelor of journalism degree from the University of Missouri and a law degree from Fordham University.


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What people think about The Cold Moon

3.5
21 ratings / 23 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    "The Cold Moon" it seems that Amelia Sachs, Rhyme's key investigator, and Rhyme must match wits with the Watchmaker, a killer that leaves a clock with each victim. In the course of the investigation, we discover that the killer purchased ten clocks leading the investigators to conclude that there is to be ten victims, not a pleasant thought given the killer's taste for suffering.

    Once again, there are multiple layers that continue to build up to the very end. He also continues developing the personal relationship between Sachs and Rhyme and addresses the conflict they have between their personal and professional lives. All the familiar characters make an appearance and a few are even added. It all combines to make a great thriller that will entertain you.
  • (4/5)
    An excellent installment in the Lincoln Rhymes series, this suspenseful mystery is chock full of unexpected twists and turns, and even a cliffhanger at the end. The sinister and brilliant criminal, The Clockmaker, is one I look forward to hearing about again.
  • (4/5)
    Joe Mantegna has one on the best voices.
    He's a genius and great actor
  • (4/5)
    Deaver writes complicated plots with characters that you can keep up with. This book is no exception.

    The Watchmakers gives the appearance of a psychotic mind strinking out with no set pattern except violent and bizarre murders. The link is a clock that he leaves at each scene as a calling card.

    Rhyme and Sachs are once again called to solve this inhuman and strange mystery. The wrench in the plans is Sachs takes on a case of her own which pulls her from a dedicated focus on the Watchmaker. Can she pull both off?

    Each case has enough strangeness but there are some really sharp left turns in the information and people involved. Some of the information deals with Sachs' father and his time as a policeman. There has been some shade cast on him and his service and this adds to the Sachs' distraction from both cases.

    Detailed analysis is the key, just like in all Rhyme's cases. Without it the threads are just knots in the fabric of these mysteries.

    Very enjoyable.
  • (2/5)
    Perhaps it was listening to a Lincoln Rhyme mystery (rather than reading it) that showed its glaring weakness. Not that Joe Mantegna's narration was a flaw -- he does a fine job. Was the padding in this book present in Deaver's earlier works and I just glossed over it while reading? More than just the periodic reiteration of what's on the "white board" but lengthy, often condescending descriptions of forensic work only necessary if the reader has not read any of the previous Rhyme books or watched an episode of "CSI." Add to that a crime so incredibly convoluted with a triple bluff that I seriously doubt if any criminal would concoct it. I couldn't wait for it to end, and it did so with a whimper, the criminal still at large. Sequel anyone? I hope that was a rare misstep by Deaver -- I have most of the subsequent books in the series stacked up ready to read.
  • (4/5)
    Gripping mystery, well read by Joe Mantegna (perfect w/ that NY accent). So many plot twists - can't wait to read more by him.
  • (4/5)
    Another good read from Jeffrey Deaver in which Kathryn Dance is introduced to the Lincoln Rhyme team.

    As with other Deaver novels just when you think that the conclusion has arrived there is a new twist on the next page. It could be argued that these 'twists' drag out the story, however, Deaver includes them and makes the twist an integral part of the story.

    I look forward to reading the next two books in the Kathryn Dance series.
  • (4/5)
    Moon-faced clocks mark the scenes of two brutal murders in New York City. In one, the victim, his wrists cut, appears to have hung on to the edge of a pier until he fell into the icy water. In the second, the man was connected to a heavy metal bar above his trussed body. When he could no longer hold his arms up, the bar dropped and crushed his neck. Two people are involved in the murders: one, the methodical killer who calls himself the Watchmaker. The second, a mentally damaged sex offender. I was ready to give up on the book at this point because I didn?t want to get into the minds of psychopaths or sociopaths, but after reading a few reviews and considering the trust I had in the person who recommended the book, I persevered and am glad I did.The case was assigned to criminologist Lincoln Rhyme and his partner and love interest, Amelia Sachs. A quadriplegic, Rhyme depends on Sachs for the on-site investigations. Sachs, however, was also working on a case of her own and had never been lead detective on a homicide before. Sachs? case eventually leads her to investigate police illegalities.Along with other characters, many from the police department, Kathryn Dance, from California, uses her training in reading people for jury selection and to find if those testifying are truthful to try to help solve the cases.THE COLD MOON has several unexpected twists that continue to the very end. They build an engrossing story though a bit contrived. Very little is as it initially appears. Instead of having the characters repeat information to each other as too many authors tend to do, Jeffrey Deaver inserts several charts throughout the book listing all the information they have collected so far. It?s quite helpful and can also be easily skipped.Good read that very few readers will be able to predict.
  • (3/5)
    An easy read, but not the most stimulating and the writing felt a bit lazy and cliched in places...................
  • (4/5)
    Couple of mistakes in plot logic near the end, but it was an enjoyable read.
  • (4/5)
    "Cold Moon" by Jeffery Deaver was a good mystery with 'the watchmaker' emerging as a the villain in this story, another in the Lincoln Rhyme series by Jeffery Deaver. Combining Rhyme?s talents with those of his partner Amelia Sacs, and Kathryn Dance, who is an expert in the field of kinesics and is a visiting expert from the Monterey Peninsula at the California Bureau of Investigation. Trying to solve the clues in the ongoing murders, where the Watchmaker?s murders leaves a moon faced clock ticking at each crime scene. The team finds a trail of confused clues that seem to leave to the conclusion that there might be an attempt to steal a precious timepiece and the victims are just collateral damage. However, the leads all seem to go to the wrong places and the story keeps turning up bodies and possible complications, such as police involvement in all the wrong ways. This is another enjoyable read for fans of police and detective mysteries.
  • (3/5)
    I was drawn in by the criminal, The Watchmaker, and all the horological tidbits. I did not like the plot which seemed far too contrived, though clever. I counted four levels of intrigue, making for an equal number of twists in the plot. It was very much plot driven with little development of character. I think if you have been following these characters through previous novels there would be enough here to keep you engaged.
  • (3/5)
    As always Deaver is the master of contemporary thrillers. His books are real page-turners and his Rhyme/Sachs series are not an exception.Back Cover Blurb:On a freezing December night, with a full moon hovering in the black skies over New York City, two people are brutally murdered - their prolonged deaths marked by eerie calling cards: clocks ticking away the victims' last minutes on earth. Lincoln Rhyme and his team have only hours to stop the icy-cold, brilliant Watchmaker, whose obsession with time drives him to plan his carnage with the precision of a fine timepiece.Amelia is not only Lincoln's eyes and ears on the Watchmaker investigation. She's now lead detective on her own first homicide - a case that sets into motion clockwork gears of its own.A case with consequences which will endanger many lives, as well as Lincoln and Amelia's future together....
  • (4/5)
    Although this is a very formulaic series, as this is a crime/thriller series this is not necessary a bad thing. Deaver is a master plotter, and his twists and turns keep the reader on their toes so that you can only be certain that the mystery is solved on the final page. Each book provides a little more insight into the unfolding relationships between his main characters. He's also not afraid to nod back to the events of previous books, there's an interesting scene with Pulaski towards the end which harkens back to an incident in "The Twelfth Card". More of the same please.
  • (3/5)
    Overall, a well-crafted mystery with engaging characters. Really scary murder methods for the reader to contemplate. The discovery the villian's true intentions wasn't that surprising and a little obvious that there was going to be bigger problems. But in general a great read for mystery fans.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent book! Fast paced and the twisting plot is never ending... but Deaver pulls it all together in the end. Reminds us to always question what you see and what you hear.Am looking forward to Deaver's next book.
  • (3/5)
    Another great Rhyme and Sachs novel. I love the detail and the twisted plot. Deaver is meticulous in closing the holes. The characters are all like family and I enjoy each book reading their interactions.
  • (3/5)
    Not one of my favorites of the Lincoln Rhyme novels, but there were enough twists and whatnot to keep me interested in it. As always, Lincoln is snarky, sarcastic, and in general a fun-as-hell character to read. Amelia Sachs is wonderful as well. I also enjoyed the new character (at least, I think he's new... I don't know if he showed up at all in any other Lincoln Rhyme novels I haven't gotten to yet), a rookie named Pulaski; he's incredibly adorable in his attempts to be as good a cop as he can be.I'm looking forward to my next Deaver novel. Most of his I have loved; The Cold Moon fell a little short for me, though.
  • (3/5)
    I have read several of the Lincoln Rhyme novels ... this one was probably one of my least favorites. There were passages that seemed repetitive and there was alot of over-explaining. I often have a degree of disbelief at the end of a story, but this one was pretty far out there.
  • (4/5)
    Once again, he got me. I should have remembered the lessons I learned from the last book and applied them here. Nothing was what it seemed. The villain was devious, brilliant and crafty and the only one who got away. I bet we see him reappear when we least expect it. I also had an intense d?j? vu moment at one point and I went searching in the older Rhyme novels for what set it off, but I never did find it and the intensity of the feeling faded out.Again Deaver presents us with a very elaborate main plot with a few side stories thrown in. Amelia's running a case of her own, something no one expected her to get results with and when she does, she encounters a lot of problems with other cops. Eventually she's presented with information about her father that upsets and disillusions her so much she decides to leave the force. Rhyme is devastated and counsels her to wait before making such a final decision. She starts training her replacement who is competent enough, but green and he'll be an interesting addition to the team if he survives.Eventually, the two cases do come together as we knew they would. I couldn't see how and the solution surprised me greatly although I should come to expect it by now. One thing that wasn't mentioned much was the movement that Rhyme was able to achieve at the end of the last book. I wanted to hear about his progress, but I didn't get any of that. Of course his big brain defeats the equally big brain of the bad guy. This time the answers were more facile than I would have liked. It was as if it wasn't even a stretch for him this time.Another big brain was introduced here in the form of Kathryn Dance; an expert in kinesics the study of body language and other cues to determine a person's real motivations, etc. I'm not sure if I like her or not. She seems enormously smug to me. I think if I had read this book before buying Deaver's latest, I might not have bought it after all since it features Dance. I thought it would be another stand alone, but it's a new series apparently.
  • (3/5)
    I've read several of the books in this series, but not all. I probably missed some of the undercurrents and byplay, but since this book is more about plot twists than character studies, you can skip over most of character interactions.It's amazing to me how formulaic a twisted plot like this can be. First there is evidence of two brutal murders, but in one -- no body. Then a killer is cornered and apprehended, but wait, he's just a simple minded accomplice. Then the real killer steps forward, but in the first case there WAS no murder, so the killer is not really a killer. But wait, yes he is a notorious hit man, but his goal is the death of more than one person. But our fearless (and bedridden) detective figures out the plot and saves the possible victims. After all that buildup, the clever criminal is allowed to escape so that he can bedevil our heroes again another day.Yes, the plot is clever. But every twist seemed telegraphed pages ahead of the event. The people involved seemed sketched, not drawn. I'll probably wait a couple of books more in this series before picking up another one.
  • (4/5)
    Lincoln Rhyme (quadraplegic forensic scientist) and Amelia Sachs (detective amour. Villian styles himself "the Watchmaker". Intricate plot that does not reveal itself before its time. If the villain is the key character, this one is just right. Good read.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent!!!On top form with plenty of twists and turns!!