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DragonQuest

DragonQuest

Written by Donita K. Paul

Narrated by Ellen Grafton


DragonQuest

Written by Donita K. Paul

Narrated by Ellen Grafton

ratings:
4/5 (25 ratings)
Length:
11 hours
Released:
Jul 16, 2009
ISBN:
9781423392637
Format:
Audiobook

Description

A dragonkeeper of Paladin, Kale is summoned from the Hall to The Bogs by the Wizard Fenworth to serve as his apprentice and tend his newly hatched meech dragon, Regidor. But Kale isn't going alone. The Hall is sending a student to monitor her performance and report back to the scholars. Worst of all, it's Bardon - an older boy Kale finds irritating, but who at least can hold his own in a sword fight.
Meanwhile, the Wizard Risto has seized another meech dragon, bringing him dangerously close to gaining the power he seeks. So with only a motley band of companions, Kale sets out on a desperate quest to rescue the second meech, to free those dragons already enslaved, and to thwart Risto's devious plans. It's up to Kale to lead the search and to embrace the role that's rightfully hers. But will her efforts be enough to save the land of Amara from the dark future that awaits at Risto's hands?
Released:
Jul 16, 2009
ISBN:
9781423392637
Format:
Audiobook


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What people think about DragonQuest

3.9
25 ratings / 25 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    The continuation of the story of Pern started in Dragonflight. I really love this series. I do get a little miffed at the "women" being regulated to the kitchen and the housework. But the introduction of the fire lizards in this story is wonderful.
  • (3/5)
    Seven years later the heroic rescue of Dragonflight brings unfortunate consequences; quarrels between the reactionaries and the more forward looking. Further tensions are caused by more technological discoveries, the newly discovered fire lizards, and a thoroughly self-centered dragon rider. Also, the baby from Dragonflight is now a teenager by the end of the book and has plenty of agency. Hints of the high technology past emerge and so does new tech, with improbable speed. A very interim book, but the turn to internal dissension as the pass continues works well. The sixties sexism continues excruciating.
  • (4/5)
    I don't know why it ends up taking me so long to read these books, I like them, I am engrossed, I do end up spending some time looking up words in the dictionary for sure. McCaffrey is a brilliant writer and she's increased my vocabulary without a doubt. I wish...-there was more Lessa in this book and her psychic abilities (which should be way more useful than they are used) -i had a better understanding of how they move between times, because why could they not have stopped the lady dragon fight if they can time travel? I must be missing something here. -they spoke more about what happened to Kylara and like...did Meron just have a chip on his shoulder? what was his deal? What happened to him? I fell like there were some key points not wrapped up here, just kinda left.-the idea of different types of abilities was more fleshed out (like Jaxom and Brekke's abilities to hear any dragon) other than these small things, I loved this book. McCaffrey suggested to read the Harper Hall series prior to reading the next book (The White Dragon), so while I await that series to come to me, I'll have to go on to something else. I suppose all of my wishes above may be answered in one of the many many many dragons of pern books anyway.
  • (4/5)
    A re-read of an old favorite.
  • (4/5)
    Not quite as good as the first book (and there are some inconsistencies) but it's still really good. I like how this volume shows a different side to the characters introduced in the first book.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent SF/fantasy series
  • (2/5)
    I went back and forth between giving it two or three stars, but since I like to stick to the goodreads definitions of stars I felt like saying I liked it was going a tad too far.

    I enjoyed Dragonquest a lot more then Dragonflight, it was told better. The thing that is really killing this series for me though is that the bad guys are always idiots. Seriously? If you don't agree with Lessa and F'nor you obviously must be crazy? I also found the work to be somewhat illogical and self-indulgent.

    On a slightly different note, I must admit that I was very interested in seeing if these earlier Pern books had as strong a secular feminist message as Dragonsong, which I reread recently and made me feel like I was being beaten to death. This was another reason that I found these books to be rather silly. While she inserts only a few pro-sexual liberation messages into these first two novels, she manages to have only one character actually take advantage of this fact, and she is promptly labeled a whore and is over-all a horrible person who ruins everyone's lives.
  • (3/5)
    Yes, I am still pushing through a reread of this series...but I'm about to drop it. The obvious sexism of the previous book gets even worse in this one, with a protagonist committing what is very clearly rape...after which the woman falls in love with him.Plot-wise, there's a growing schism betwen F'lar's riders and the Oldtimers, who were brought up out of the past to save Pern in a previous book. The Oldtimers are resistant to F'lar's innovations, and Kylara (a stock 'scarlet woman' caricature) wreaks havoc by having the same lack of inhibitions as the men. Meanwhile, the parasitic Thread is falling where and when it shouldn't, making the future of life on Pern questionable.Excellent world-building ruined with awful characterization.
  • (3/5)
    I think I may have liked this a bit more than the first book. Could be that there was less need for history and talking about what might happen--less saying, more doing. I think my appetite is actually whetted for the next book; the white dragon mystery really intrigued me.
  • (3/5)
    I loved this book because I was very fond of F'nor and Brekke. The sad parts, and the "don't leave me alone!" part, broke my heart.
  • (4/5)
    The second book in the Dragons of Pern series, continues the story of Lessa, Weyrwoman of Pern and her consort. In this book, McCaffrey begins to explore the dragons themselves in greater depth and sets up an expectation in the reader that these creatures are a bit more than simply beasts "living in the present." The author does a nice job of setting up a series of obstacles for her characters to overcome that are, within the context of her created universe, quite believable.
  • (5/5)
    The Pern books are technically science fiction, set on a lost colony of Earth, but it's often found on fantasy lists, for here be dragons. Although I lost interest in the series with its later books the original trilogy and the Harper Hall trilogy set in the same universe remain favorites I've reread more than once. (If you haven't already, you should read the first book, Dragonflight, before reading Dragonquest.) Part of the reason I love the early Pern novels is that McCaffrey sets up an intriguing world with it's fighting dragons bonded to their riders. Part of it is that McCaffrey makes you care about the characters: Lessa, F'Nor, F'Lar, Brekke (Some of the most moving lump-in-throat episodes concern her in this novel.) Oh, and I'd say F'Nor's dragon Canth certainly is one of the most endearing. This isn't the kind of book that leaves an impression because of style or because it's thought-provoking--but because it's a wonderful escapist read with characters you love spending time with. (Except perhaps the irritatingly vapid and vain Kylara--although she does make for a great villain.)
  • (5/5)
    The best of Anne McCaffrey's Dragons of Pern series, just pipping the first book, Dragonflight. Try reading the scene where F'nor and Canth go to the Red Star and return a bloodied mess, to be rescued by all the other dragons on Pern, without a lump in your throat.
  • (4/5)
    Used to be my favourite of the DragonRiders series, although re-readings as an adult have left me irritated with the male-dominated themes, particularly the text's treatment of violence towards women. The plot still retains its power, however, and the final scenes are cathartic and bittersweet.
  • (3/5)
    The Dragonriders of Pern continues to follow Lessa as tensions rise between the old world riders and the modern riders. Expectations of respect and payment due to flights have changed, and while the society remains in many ways feudal, the 400 year stretch without Thread caused some social change, and current leaders such as Robinton have used recent crises to push for greater change and integration of groups. Now war among dragonriders or between dragonriders and Lord Holders could easily break out. Thread has begun falling out of pattern, and information has become a valuable commodity. As the story opens the future of Pern remains unclear.A fun, easy read, this novel continues to follow the same core group (Lessa, F'lar, Robinton, the Master Smith, etc.).
  • (1/5)
    Well, this was... dull. So very, very dull.

    Unlike the first book, which followed solely Lessa, on this one we get POVs from several characters. However, each time I started to care about someone's storyline, the chapter ended, POV shifted, and I went back to the starting point of not caring. Repeat for at least half the book.

    Then, there was talking. Lots and lots of talking. Interesting talking? Nope, not to me. And the characters felt so very 2D - the good guys were always good, the antagonistic guys were always 'stupid' and stubborn. There were no actual bad guys (unless you count the threads). I didn't even like Lessa much, and I actually quite liked her in the first book. It didn't help that I was figuring out things twice as fast as the protagonists half of the time.

    The plus: the world is still interesting, and the exposition on the nature of the red star was intriguing as well. I got quite curious on what will happen to the white dragon , but not enough to plow through another book like this.

    The worst: I didn't care that much about the characters. Only Brekke and F'nor had my sympathy most of the time, and that's the extent of how much I cared in this book.

  • (3/5)
    F'lar and F'nor handle more politics in the second Pern book. Can they invent the telephone? Can they find grubs that eat thread? Can they give all the noblemen of Pern a firelizard of their own? Can the haughty Oldtimers get used to the ways things are done now, 400 years in the future?
  • (5/5)
    The sequal to dragonflight is much, much better. The pace was still a little too fast, but not as much. The characters in this book makes me feel like they are very immature. I think it's just impression, but that's what it makes me think. And in here is a surprising turn of events that shocked me and made me cry out for blood on one of the characters. 
  • (5/5)
    2nd in the first Pern trilogy, tells the continuing story of the dragonriders. Very good, my favorite actually.
  • (5/5)
    Among the dragonriders of pern books, I like this best of all. I like F'nor and I think its funny how F'lar orders him and N'ton around. Best of all, I love how F'nor loves Brekke that they would break traditions for it. Canth is the most amizing brown, ever.
  • (5/5)
    Fantasy has had a (somewhat undeserved, I think) bad name as a genre among believers, given how some of the works treat morality and faith. Beyond The Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Narnia, believers have been unwilling (which is a shame, in my opinion) to give fantasy a chance. Recent years have seen some terrific Christian fantasies, that deserve a look by believers. One of these great series, are those written by author Donita K. Paul, whose books are quite well known and loved for their vivid stories, great morals, and high-quality world building. DragonQuest, the second book in The Dragonkeeper Chronicles is an example of this quality typical of Paul's work. It follows the young Dragon Keeper and Wizard apprentice, Kale Allerion, as she, her friend from the first book, Dar, their upper classman at the Hall (where servants of Paladin train) Bardon, and a young Doneel (Dar's race) named Toopka, begin yet another adventure. They are all sent to Wizard Fenworth, so that Kale can care for the fast-growing Meech Dragon she rescued from the evil wizard Risto at the end of the previous book. The very elderly Bog Wizard is starting to take a turn for the worse due to the stress that the young Meech Dragon, Regidor, is putting him under. Kale is needed to guide Regidor so Fenworth is able to avoid stress. She also needs to begin her apprenticeship under Fenworth. Soon, word reaches them of another mission from Paladin, the servant of Wulder. There is another Meech Dragon that has been found and hatched by Risto and his fellow rogue wizards. Risto is using the other Meech to sow discord among dragons and their human partners in an attempt to weaken the populace of Amara enough for his forces to conquer it. Kale and her friends know that Wulder (God) will stop Risto. The question is whether He will use them to stop Risto's forces now, or allow them to fall in battle to serve His greater glory? They know they can not win without Him, but they also know they must trust Him. What will happen? The book is, like it's predecessor, much darker in tone than the later published (but FAR earlier chronologically) series, The Chiril Chronicles. I would even go so far as to say that no one younger than in their late teens should read this book. Incidents in the book include someone being bludgeoned on the head by a thrown rock, someone being kidnapped and assaulted, their clothes stripped from them and burned, and a character being set on fire and burning to death. Please, do not get me wrong. I am NOT saying that this book is gratuitously violent, or should not be read. What I am saying is that Mrs. Paul pulls no punches when it comes to the lengths that evil will go to to win, and how far sinful people can go. She uses her fictional world to make these points to great effect, and the book is dark, but ultimately filled with hope, as she also points out how, if we surrender to God's will, things will work out in the end, whatever we suffer for His glory. As long as the reader is late teens or above, this book is a fun adventure, and one that will help the reader to reflect more on the glory and majesty of God, and how trusting Him helps us overcome the horrors of this rebellious world. Highly Recommended, for older teenagers and up. NOT RECOMMENDED for younger teenagers and children.
  • (5/5)
    The ending of this book is absolutely fabulous! And as for the rest of the book, not too far off either. I was not able to read this book through as fast as I would like, as I was interrupted by a million different things. Yet, I'm so glad I was able to read it. [author: Donita Paul] really knows how to tell a story. Some characters you think you know until you don't, and it is in an amazing way that you didn't see coming. One of the things that she has put into her good vs. evil I have recently seen in a new book up and coming [book: Beyond the Reflection's Edge] by [author: Bryan Davis]. It is amazing how things of the devil can look so much like the wonders of God, until you really look at them and see what they are made of fully. This book continues right after where the first [book: DragonSpell] ended. But here, you get more characters added into this wonderful assortment of personalities. I love the wizards! There is adventure, and this is quite the comfy entertaining story without a worry in the world, unless you consider the mordalkeeps, and bisonbecks, or the other creatures that want to turn you over to the evil wizard Risto and keep you from realizing the truth and power of Paladin and Wulder. *sigh* The message here is so complete, and just in a form that is needed. This book will be great for kids, and prompt the right questions and a great direction for life. Highly recommended for people in all places of life!
  • (5/5)
    I highly recommend this book! Very enjoyable, though I would say to read DragonSpell before you read this, at it is first in the series, and you'll be able to understand this book better. I liked this one better than the first, and it kept me reading straight through; I couldn't stop!
  • (5/5)
    This is a good book!!! It is not as good as the other Dragon Keeper books but it's still good!
  • (4/5)
    Plot Summary: What happens, When & Where, Central Characters, Major ConflictsThe main character, a 15 year old dragonkeeper named Kale, is sent on several missions involving wizards, dragons, battles, and magic. Kale was an engaging character; she faces many challenges--such as two women who both claim to be her long-lost mother. She also has pledged her life to the service of Paladin, who is a mysterious leader who only occasionally appears with instructions about what Wulder's will is (Wulder apparently being the "God" of the story). .Style Characterisics: Pacing, clarity, structure, narrative devices, etc.Paul has created a lively fantasy world peopled with many strange and wonderful kinds of creatures, places, and objects. I found it confusing at first, and had to consult the glossary at the back of the book many times. But once I got into the story and connected with the struggles of the main character it was a delightful read. How Good is it?"Definitely try it if you are an Anne McCaffrey fan! For younger readers or those young at heart.