Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
Wicked Game

Wicked Game

Written by Lisa Jackson and Nancy Bush

Narrated by Susan Ericksen


Wicked Game

Written by Lisa Jackson and Nancy Bush

Narrated by Susan Ericksen

ratings:
3.5/5 (10 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Released:
Aug 2, 2011
ISBN:
9781455819362
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

ONE BY ONE, THEY'LL DIE...
Twenty years ago, wild child Jessie Brentwood vanished from St. Elizabeth's high school. Most in Jessie's tight circle of friends believed she simply ran away. Few suspected that Jessie was hiding a shocking secret-one that brought her into the crosshairs of a vicious killer....

UNTIL THERE'S NO ONE LEFT...
Two decades pass before a body is unearthed on school grounds and Jessie's old friends reunite to talk. Most are sure that the body is Jessie's, that the mystery of what happened to her has finally been solved. But soon, Jessie's friends each begin to die in horrible,
freak accidents that defy explanation....

BUT HER...
Becca Sutcliff has been haunted for years by unsettling visions of Jessie, certain her friend met with a grisly end. Now the latest deaths have her rattled. Becca can sense that an evil force is shadowing her too, waiting for just the right moment to strike. She feels like she's going crazy. Is it all a coincidence-or has Jessie's killer finally returned to finish what was started all those years ago?

Released:
Aug 2, 2011
ISBN:
9781455819362
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

When asked what has inspired her to write more than 50 novels brimming with adventure, intrigue, hot passion, and high emotion, bestselling Oregon author, Lisa Jackson gets a mischievous smile on her face. Then the words flow as fast as her fingers fly on her computer keyboard when she writes. Her eyes sparkling with memories, she tells stories of her youth, stories of a Huckleberry Finn childhood in the small lumber town of Molalla and on her grandparents' nearby farm in the hilly region of western Oregon. There in the old growth timber, Lisa rode bareback and raced along the ages-old sheep, cattle and deer trails. In the nearby river, she skinnydipped and caught crawdads in her bare hands. An inventive child, she sneaked out of the house and rode her bicycle or horse in the moonlight and dreamed up childish pranks that would have done Tom Sawyer proud. "Nobody could have had a better childhood," Lisa remarks, her twinkling eyes and got-away-with-something-grin giving her a youthful appearance that defies the fact that she is in her mid-40s and the mother of two college-age sons. "My childhood was enchanted. We were a small, tightly knit family. My mum and dad were and still are my greatest supporters." Why then does Lisa write lousy dads and conniving relatives into the plots of books that regularly earn berths on such national bestseller lists as USA Today's and Waldenbooks'? "I think the deepest angst people can experience is what can develop among family members, because our emotions run so deep there," Lisa replied. "Deep down, we care about these people, but being related doesn't mean we think alike or want the same things. I also think manipulative people are fascinating. Characters like those help me to keep the readers' interest. I love it when readers write me to complain that they didn't get any sleep the night before because they had to finish my book." Lisa studied English Literature at Oregon State University for two years before she married. In 1981, when her younger son was a year old, she began writing novels. But she decided she needed a steady income and landed a nine-dollar-per-hour bank job. Before she could begin work, however, her supervisor was arrested for embezzling. "About then I sold my first book, A Twist of Fate, which — guess what! — was about a woman suspected of bank embezzling. It was purely coincidental. The story came out of my background in banking," Lisa provided. "But I guess you could say, if not for a bank embezzler, I might not have made it as an author." In addition to suspenseful contemporary page-turners, Lisa also delivers medieval romances set in eleventh and twelfth century Wales. "I enjoy doing these medieval period pieces, because women were so trod upon then. By nature of their lot in life, I can generate empathy or sympathy for the medieval heroines. They're underdogs from the get-go. Tell me what woman doesn't root for the underdog!" Britannia Roads, a creative Lansing, Michigan tour packager, read the first in Lisa's medieval trilogy and loved her writing so much that she designed a tour of Wales, with Lisa as the featured guest. Tour members will visit some of Princess Diana's favourite places to stay in Ruthin Castle. They'll be in for a treat when Lisa regales them with author stories during the tour, for she is as talented at public speaking as she is at writing novels. When not writing, Lisa enjoys spectator sports, reading, watching The X-Files and socialising now that she's a single mum. Her favourite authors include Pat Conroy, Nelson DeMille, Stephen King, Patricia Cornwell, Dick Francis, and other authors who also write compelling page-turners.

Related to Wicked Game

Related Audiobooks
Related Articles

Reviews

What people think about Wicked Game

3.5
10 ratings / 6 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    Wicked Game accomplishes the remarkable fete of being over the top, melodramatic at times, and utterly mundane and boring at other times. Unfortunately, there wasn’t a whole lot in between these two extremes.I knew I wouldn’t like this novel right from the opening scene. It was a dramatic scene, but it was so overwritten with cliché and forced melodrama. Instead of creating tension, it made me roll my eyes. There are times to turn up the intensity, but the execution from the authors was lacking. The characters were bland. Some were vanilla, and others were not remotely likeable. At the top of the list of the unlikeable (or maybe it was just the silly name they gave him) was The Third. I mean, who would call somebody The Third? I didn’t find the protagonist, Becca, at all likeable and I found her reaction to rejoicing after learning she was pregnant after literally her first date with her old high school sweetheart beyond unrealistic.The antagonist wasn’t so much a character as a cardboard cutout with no characteristics that resemble an actual human being. Bad guys are generally very difficult to get right, but this villain was especially poor. I can’t say there was much I liked about the novel and I would not recommend it.Carl Alves – author of The Invocation
  • (5/5)
    It's a paranormal thriller as well as a romance...heavier on the paranormal. It's also a very long book and it was sometimes made even longer by the author...for some unknown reason... repeating lines verbatim in several different chapters. In spite of that small flaw...the characters are well developed and, even with its length, you just have to find out what was going to happen. There were lots of twists and turns and lots and lots of red herrings to keep the reader in suspense. Many times I I thought I knew who did it, but I didn't actually figure that out until nearly the end. I always have felt that If a writer can keep the mystery going until the very end then they have done their best job. Any mystery and suspense or thriller fan will love this trilogy...and this is only book 1.
  • (3/5)
    A lovely suspense story. Read the book in one night. It was fun to read and I would read it again.
  • (5/5)
    amazing! I really loved this one, edge of your seat suspense
  • (3/5)
    Twenty years ago, Jessie disappeared. Now her bones have been discovered in the center of the maze at her old school. Her circle of friends is under renewed suspicion. Becky has started having visions again. Then more people begin to die....
  • (1/5)
    This book is definitely forgettable. Half the book is about high school friends reuniting to rehash whether their friend Jessie left town or whether she really did die. Another 40% of the book is spent with a series of pointless deaths. The remaining pages of the book attempt to tie the story together but fails miserably. It kind of tells a story of incest and some man who is trying to kill two women who he thinks are the devil spawn but it doesn't really go into too much detail. The book is written by two authors and you can definitely tell when one person is dominating the writing more than the other person. I really disliked this book but felt the need to finish it. I would rate it at most a one out of five.