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Kitty Goes to Washington

Kitty Goes to Washington

Written by Carrie Vaughn

Narrated by Marguerite Gavin


Kitty Goes to Washington

Written by Carrie Vaughn

Narrated by Marguerite Gavin

ratings:
4/5 (73 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 6, 2009
ISBN:
9781400182596
Format:
Audiobook

Description

The country's only celebrity werewolf, late-night radio host Kitty Norville prefers to be heard, not seen. But when she's invited to testify at a Senate hearing on behalf of supernaturals, her face gets plastered on national television.



Kitty has been in hot water before, but jumping into the D.C. underworld brings a new set of problems-and a new set of friends and enemies, including the vampire mistress of the city; a super-hot Brazilian were-jaguar; and a paranoid, Bible-thumping senator who wants to expose Kitty as a monster. Kitty quickly learns that in this city of dirty politicians and backstabbing pundits, everyone's itching for a fight.
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 6, 2009
ISBN:
9781400182596
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Carrie Vaughn is best known for her New York Times bestselling series of novels about a werewolf named Kitty who hosts a talk radio show for the supernaturally disadvantaged. Her novels include a near-Earth space opera, Martians Abroad, from Tor Books, and the post-apocalyptic murder mysteries Bannerless and The Wild Dead. She's written several other contemporary fantasy and young adult novels, as well as upwards of 80 short stories, two of which have been finalists for the Hugo Award. She's a contributor to the Wild Cards series of shared world superhero books edited by George R. R. Martin and a graduate of the Odyssey Fantasy Writing Workshop. An Air Force brat, she survived her nomadic childhood and managed to put down roots in Boulder, Colorado.


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What people think about Kitty Goes to Washington

4.0
73 ratings / 58 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    So Kitty goes to Washington, meets some interesting were's and a vampire. Crazy times abound.
  • (4/5)
    Not as strong as the first but still highly entertaining. The legal and scientific references give inevitability a stronger foothold in Kitty's world.
  • (3/5)
    I liked this so much better than the first book. The first book was super-triggery for me, with Kitty's submissive nature and the sex-dominance-control thing going on in her pack. This book was Kitty learning how to be Kitty and I kind of like her when she's on her own. This book is enough for me to look forward to picking up book 3 and reading it.

    Kitty's in DC to testify before a Senate committee. Her lawyer, Ben, is there with her, and Ben turns out to be kind of a cool guy, definitely the rock Kitty needs. I worried for a while that Kitty was forming her own super team with all the people she was picking up--the reporter who knows magic, the psychic channeler--but it seems only one of those might reappear in a good way.

    Vampires become a little more, well, human, after meeting the Mistress of the City whose human servants are all her descendents. She cares for them and does not live surrounded by other vampires, preferring not to bring over anyone who doesn't fully understand the life. I liked her. She and Kitty have a little bit of a touching scene about jewelry which for Kitty and maybe the vampire was more about having a little bit of what passes for normalcy in their lives.

    I also liked the club of weres Kitty discovers through her were-jaguar sex partner. All sorts of weres hang out there, not just wolves, and they say that DC's international flavor is the reason for this. There are no packs there, but the club seems to be some sort of were embassy, so to speak. Kitty feels at home there and she needs that.

    Now for the disappointing part. Elijah Smith, the faith healer from the first book, is back in this one. He's working with Senator Duke and testifying before the committee. He's just as terrifying and mysterious as ever. And then a page later we find out what he is, a page after that he's conquered and gone. Um, what? Waste of a character. He could have been a book of his own.

    The big thing of this book is what I'm going to call Kitty's first TV appearance. I'm not sure why that was a good thing to do at this point in the series or even what purpose it serves. I'm hoping that comes clear in the next book.
  • (4/5)
    Kitty goes to Washington, DC to testify before Congress about the subject of her radio show. She is a werewolf, and her radio show takes call-in questions about, and sometimes from, the more supernatural citizens. The Senator that requested her presence is a Bible-thumper looking for political power.Along the way she meets Alette, the female Vampire Master of the City, a sexy were-jaguar, and solves the mystery of the tent-show leader she met in the first book. A good, fun read.
  • (3/5)
    Loved the first book in this series. But it lost me on the second.
  • (4/5)
    DJ Kitty has gotten herself into quite a mess this time. She has to go before the senate and gets stopped by the Men in Black on her way to DC. The proceed to take her to a Vampires house where they say she will be protected from those of her own kind in the area. She decides to trust them, then proceeds to go out and about on her own and finds herself into more than she realized she was going to get into. This book was great and I won't go anyfurther as I don't want to put spoilers out there. But I am really enjoying the series thus far. So off to read the next one.
  • (4/5)
    I generally prefer vampires to werewolves, but I really like the world Vaughn has created. I like that weres are not necessarily wolves. A light, fun read.
  • (4/5)
    DJ Kitty has gotten herself into quite a mess this time. She has to go before the senate and gets stopped by the Men in Black on her way to DC. The proceed to take her to a Vampires house where they say she will be protected from those of her own kind in the area. She decides to trust them, then proceeds to go out and about on her own and finds herself into more than she realized she was going to get into. This book was great and I won't go anyfurther as I don't want to put spoilers out there. But I am really enjoying the series thus far. So off to read the next one.
  • (5/5)
    It has been a little while since I read this book but here is what I recall...

    I love the series!! Yummy romance involving shifters. Plenty of steamy action and a touch of humor!

    Definitely a series to get into! I started it and didn't stop until I reached the last book that was released! I am always looking for the next book!

    If you like steamy shifter romances this is a series to look into!!!!
  • (4/5)
    I read the first book in the series a few years ago and had the next few books waiting in my to-read for ages. I was in the mood for a fun, fast urban fantasy and decided it was high time to pick up another of Vaughn's books. I'm glad I did. I'm not a huge fan of werewolves and vampires, but I really enjoy Vaughn's approach. Kitty is a relatable heroine--spunky, a little foolish, but means well. The pace is perfect. One of the bad guys--a congressman--was a screaming stereotype but at the same time, there ARE guys in the senate like that. The end had some brilliant twists, certainly not the kind of thing you expect in a second book, and leaves me curious about how things will develop.I have the third book and I'm reading that next.
  • (5/5)
    What would happen if the world found out the supernatural existed? This is one of the first series I read that takes the reader through the revelation and the results of it.
  • (4/5)
    Not the most sophisticated writing in the world, but the characters and the story are cute and often poignant. She asks the hard questions about life as something more than human. A great paranormal series.
  • (4/5)
    3 1/2
    I liked this one also. I just found part of it unlikely to happen but take it with a grain of salt. Still it was entertaining. Kitty gets called to testify at a senate oversight committee on whether funding should continue on the medical study that had been classified before Kitty was outted as a werewolf. Really all, but the contentious zealot religious fanatic Senator, Senator Duke, of the panel doesn't take it very serious. It seems that most still don't believe that the supernatural exist even though the scientist that had been studying them testifies to that fact.

    Kitty comes to Washington and meets the vampire faction and then the were/ lycanthrope faction which are very different than what she has been a part of so far. She is attracted to a were-panther.

    This has politic intrigue and without spoilers, people try to influence the panel by force. A side story of the reverend Elijah from the 1st book is concluded which was satisfactory for me.

    What didn't work for me after capturing Kitty, these people would not have allowed the transmission of a program on her behalf. I understand that the report is filming live, but there would be no reason for the other persons in the room to allow him to change his type of transmission. It only puts them at a disadvantage and gives her a voice. Duke's armed guards wouldn't have allowed it, IMO. Still I took it as, they did not want to lose the feed and the reporter wanted more. was her keeping control in a situation where all control in a situation where that was nearly impossible.

    Quick read, still no my favorite but a good series all the same. I liked this book slightly better than the last.
  • (3/5)
    After a vicious attack, Kitty Norville woke up to find that she'd become a werewolf. But with enhanced speed, senses, and strength came supernatural pack dynamics that twisted all too easily into abuse. For years she cowered, but the advice she gave others on her radio show finally helped her stand up for herself.

    Now she's traveling the country, doing her radio show and seeing the sights. It's a good life--one that a Senate subpeona disrupts. She's summoned to give evidence on supernatural creatures to a committee that's half fact-finding mission, half witch-hunt.

    I really liked this. This is what I think of when I think urban fantasy, where the emphasis is on the paranormal, not romance, and the world feels like a believable place. No one's over-powered, or has shining hair down to the ground, or has rippling muscles. The language is matter-of-fact but not without a few unique voice to the main character. The main character herself is competant but slightly overwhelmed; I was sure she'd survive, but doubted she'd do so without taking damage. There are no miracles here, even if there is magic.
  • (4/5)
    Kitty Norville is back and still rushing into things headfirst in her usual fashion. I suspect this is going to be one of those series you will either love or hate and I am loving it. Quickly and nonstop read. Not a whole lot to say without spoilers or repeating what the goodreads blurb already says. She does get a healthier love life than the abusive pack stuff that was in first book, still in the fade-to-black category. Familiar characters from first book (the bounty hunter, the lawyer, staff on her radio show, etc.) and new ones (a mix of unexpectedly vivid, 3d ones and a few strictly in the background ones--I mention because this author is quite good at using a few words or paragraphs to bring someone almost to life for the reader). Avoided my two recent pet peeves of endlessly recapping previous book and making up or finding really esoteric words to use. (seriously, I don't mind expanding my vocabulary but lately have gotten paranormal/fantasy authors who have done stuff that make for very odd reading unless you go buy the esoteric dictionary/thesaurus/reference from which they got or adapted the odd words).
  • (2/5)
    This was awful, completely different from the first in the series. It feels like it was written by someone else. It was boring and nothing happened until near the end. There would be a moment when you thought there was danger or action and it would be over in a paragraph. There were no twists or surprises; everyone and everything was exactly what they seemed from the beginning and I figured out the ending within a couple of chapters of beginning the book. She was consistently saved from non-danger by men except the one time that it made no sense why she wasn't helped before she escaped.

    I have more to say but right now I'm too irritated. I'll write a proper review if I feel like it later.
  • (3/5)
    I was sold on Kitty Goes to Washington right from the very first page. Kitty the Werewolf (ha ha) is a totally engaging radio hostess - the dialogue from the shows is wonderful, through the book you get such insight into her personality through her broadcasts. I totally rooted for her as the show caught on and gained in popularity, and I loved seeing her gain confidence and backbone.

    And I loved Vaughn's take on the supernatural world - the werewolves and the vampires. She doesn't pull her punches, and Kitty's werewolf pack isn't all sunshine and roses. Her weres and vamps are scary, they are not human, and they are dangerous. The book is edgy, there's a lot of tension and conflicted emotions and the characters are very complex...nobody's all good or all bad. That makes them more engaging, and it also keeps the reader guessing (kind of - the murderer was pretty easy to figure out).
  • (2/5)
    In many ways this seemed like a completely different author than the first book. None of the weird "pack" issues or self esteem problems for Kitty! Instead, success and got-it-done-nes. I'm glad it wasn't in the pattern of the first book, but this was too much of a leap without real character development.
  • (4/5)
    the "kitty" books are thusfar definitely closer to urban fantasy than paranormal romance territory, so if you prefer your creatures of the night to have more angsty love & sex than angsty plot development, move along. those of us on the other side of the equation, though, will enjoy these adventures. a fast-paced, quick read, perfect for spending a lazy morning late in bed.
  • (4/5)
    2nd in the series. Enjoyable, enough action and humor to make it a quick read.

    Kitty learns more about her attorney, is outed (in a most graphic manner) to her family, and gets to play with vampires and other things that go bump in the night.

    The bit about the faith healer seemed pretty thin, with an anti-climactic climax.

    After finishing this book, I immediately ordered the remaining two in the series.
  • (4/5)
    This is the second book in the Kitty series, and I loved it just as much as I loved the first. Kitty remains a great balence of optimistic and hopeful yet sensible, self aware and a smidge cynical. The plot gets a bit far fetched in places, but it is held together by the intensity of the story and how much I cared about Kitty. The books still feel like part of a series (well, they are) and as though that has been strangely chopped up. The first book was 'Kitty is a wearwolf and leaves her pack' and the second is 'Kitty testifies to the senate that wearwolves are real but should not be persecuted'. But there is a story about the Evil Evangelicals, that starts about halfway through the first book, and mostly-ends halfway through this book, that just felt odd. I guess I am too used to books that are more selfcontained packages.
  • (4/5)
    What an enjoyable little read! Some of the characters were a little over-the-top cliche, but others more than made up for that. This is a good book for anyone looking for an entertaining and quick read.
  • (4/5)
    These books hit just the right spot with me-- fun without being silly, balancing real world building and the issues that world would bring with an interesting, realistic cast of characters.
  • (3/5)
    Number 2 in the Kitty Norville series is wildly entertaining! Kitty is a werewolf who hosts a radio talk show called The Midnight Hour, where she chats with callers on the subject of ghosties and ghoulies and things that go bump in the night. She is startled to learn that she has been subpoenaed to appear as an expert on the supernatural at senate hearings on that subject. She meets good guys and bad guys along the way. This is an easy and fun read.
  • (3/5)
    Though not a 'literary' piece of writing by any means, it was a pleasant enough way to pass a few hours, and I do like the main character. The book was a little slow at the start but the pace picked up in the second half. It is, perhaps, a touch weaker than the first book in the series, but not enough to put me off reading more.
  • (5/5)
    I went looking for an easy read that was fulfilling. This book fits the bill perfectly. I love the practical approach that Kitty takes. She is a pleasant break from the vapid characters that this genre suffers from.
  • (2/5)
    Really, really annoying. Interesting story but badly told. The main character keeps telling us how dumb she is an how bad she is at planning - then proves it over and over again. I was determined to stick with it until the bitter end, and wow was it difficult. Too bad - could have been interesting.
  • (5/5)
    Another excellent book in the series. I really hope that they are all this good.
  • (4/5)
    Pretty much on the same level as the first book - fun, enjoyable fluff. (See my review for Kitty and The Midnight Hour.) Light and entertaining, it's a great read as long as you don't expect too much out of it.
  • (3/5)
    In the second installment in the Kitty Norville series, Kitty the werewolf has left, or been driven out of, her hometown. Though her life as a lone wolf seems to be wearing on her, she enjoys being in charge of some of her own destiny in the form of her weekly radio show. This liminal existence is thrown off when she receives a subpoena to appear before a Congressional committee - one that promises to affect the lives and statuses of all supernatural beings in America.This book did not live up to the possibilities I saw in the prequel. While Kitty grows into her own in the first book, she cannot decide on how to approach her own self-liberation or empowerment. This indecision on the protagonist does not mesh well with the decision of the author to introduce some fairly big issues in this second novel, such as supernatural beings and the government, their use or abuse in the military, and the place and morals of power. Other similar novels (such as Briggs' werewolf series, or that by Wilkes) benefited from a more focused set of problems (a murder investigation, etc.) through which the protagonist is able to explore this supernatural world and how it fits into the America with which we are familiar, though the issues in the end often end up being just as heady. The vanquishing of the bad guys was also a bit anticlimactic, making the ending feel just like the next step in the story, not an actual end. This gives the book too much of a serial feel for me, not as if it was the next in a series, but as though it was an episode - nice in magazines and tv shows, but not my favorite thing to find in books. Perhaps this series will continue to gradually mature with its heroine, but I'm not in a hurry to continue it. Kitty's story is an easy and entertaining enough beach read, but nothing I would go out of my way to find.