Enjoy millions of ebooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more

Only $11.99/month after trial. Cancel anytime.

Kull: Exile of Atlantis

Kull: Exile of Atlantis

Written by Robert E. Howard

Narrated by Todd McLaren


Kull: Exile of Atlantis

Written by Robert E. Howard

Narrated by Todd McLaren

ratings:
4.5/5 (12 ratings)
Length:
11 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jan 2, 2010
ISBN:
9781400182275
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In a meteoric career that spanned a mere twelve years, Robert E. Howard single-handedly invented the genre that came to be called sword and sorcery. From his fertile imagination sprang some of fiction's most enduring heroes. Yet while Conan the Cimmerian is indisputably Howard's greatest creation, it was in his earlier sequence of tales featuring Kull, a fearless warrior with the brooding intellect of a philosopher, that Howard began to develop the distinctive themes and the richly evocative blend of history and mythology that would distinguish his later tales of the Hyborian Age.



Much more than simply the prototype for Conan, Kull is a fascinating character in his own right: an exile from fabled Atlantis who wins the crown of Valusia, only to find it as much a burden as a prize.



This groundbreaking collection brings together all of Howard's stories featuring Kull: "Exile of Atlantis," "The Shadow Kingdom," "The Mirrors of Tuzun Thune," "The Cat and the Skull," "The Screaming Skull of Silence," "The Striking of the Gong," "The Altar and the Scorpion," "The Curse of the Golden Skull," "By This Axe I Rule!" "Swords of the Purple Kingdom," "The King and the Oak," and "Kings of the Night."
Publisher:
Released:
Jan 2, 2010
ISBN:
9781400182275
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Robert E. Howard (1906–1936) was an American author of pulp fiction, who made a name for himself by publishing numerous short stories in pulp magazines. Known as the “Father of Sword and Sorcery,” Howard helped create this subgenre of fiction. He is best known for his character Conan the Barbarian, who has inspired numerous film and television adaptations. Howard committed suicide at the age of thirty.  


Related to Kull

Related Audiobooks

Related Articles


Reviews

What people think about Kull

4.7
12 ratings / 4 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Solid narrator. Gives an understanding of Kull's place in Howard's work. Improves around chapter four and five, if you are struggling to keep going.
  • (4/5)
    Many folks know Robert E. Howard for his sword & sorcery character Conan. However, before there was Conan, there was Kull from Atlantis, a mere man who won the crown of Valusia. This book comprises the previously published and unpublished Kull stories and poems. Additionally, there are two essays by Robert E. Howard enthusiasts. In this book are the following stories: “Exile of Atlantis,” “The Shadow Kingdom,” “The Mirrors of Tuzun Thune,” “The Cat and the Skull,” “The Screaming Skull of Silence,” “The Striking of the Gong,” “The Altar and the Scorpion,” “The Curse of the Golden Skull,” “By This Axe I Rule!” “Swords of the Purple Kingdom,” “The King and the Oak,” and “Kings of the Night.”I think this book would be great for REH enthusiasts but perhaps not for the REH beginner. The opening essay on the magnificence of REH lasts about half the first CD. This essay refers to things a newbie wouldn’t know about – like specific imagery in the Kull and Conan stories. I personally have only read one collection of Conan stories plus Wolfshead. So much of the references to the Kull stories were completely lost on me. I was ready to jump into the Kull tales right away, so I skipped ahead and came back to the opening essay later.The collection of stories is great. Since most of the tales follow chronologically one after the other, they almost read like one big novel when strung together. I was very surprised to see that there were no racial slurs as I have seen in the Conan stories. I honestly don’t know if this collection was sanitized for modern readers or if that is how Howard truly wrote them. I do know that nearly all of these tales went unpublished until long after Howard’s death. At any rate, I got swept up into the magic, the betrayals, the sheer might in wielding a heavy sword!As with other Howard stories, the ladies are few and far between. They don’t always get names or spoken lines. If they aren’t sexual objects to be protected and bedded, then they are betrayers. This is a theme that has been in nearly all Howard works I have read (the exceptions being those works that contain zero females). I am sure there are some interesting psychological analysis of Howard and his works out there.This audiobook also contains drafts of his Kull stories which are very close to the final versions and I found them a bit redundant. The book ends with another essay on the awesomeness that is Kull and REH. I think this second essay was more interesting simply because I had some knowledge of the Kull stories at that point.Over all, I loved the imagery of the Kull stories, the adventure, the male bonding and camaraderie. REH has this way with words that turns scratches on a page into a full, lush landscape. He would be one of my favorite writers if he included some worthy female characters. Alas, that isn’t to be.Narration: Todd McLaren was a good pick for this book. He had that noble, yet gruff, voice for Kull that made me want to strap on a leather loin cloth, arm myself to the teeth, and set off on an adventure with the warrior. He also had excellent voices for other recurring side characters like Brule. There is one cat character that talks and McLaren did a good job making it sound like a snobby cat. His female voices were done well, especially the old crone.
  • (4/5)
    I loved the Kull stories, even with all their inconsistencies (which I probably would have ignored had I not read the editor's notes at the end). I'm a big fan of sword and sorcery stories to begin with and I honestly don't think many have done it better than Howard has. I look forward to moving on to Conan.
  • (5/5)
    Kull seems to be something like a blueprint for the later Conan. He is a barbarian but unlike Conan he does not try to solve everything with his sword. He uses his brains and one can almost feel his disgust with all the plotting and scheming around him that will only make him react with more force and more blood spilling. He can easily be put aflame by disrespect of others and then there is no way that he will cool off without taking his revenge (in one tale he is even ready to go to the end of the known world to punish the man who openly called him a coward and usurper).He seems to be a man placed in a wrong time and place - he got to the throne but soon he found out that throne is the most lonesome place in the entire world. Although he tries to do his best (and his kingdom does prosper) he is kept in contempt by his subjects only because of his origin. This seems to hurt him the most.Only character that comes to my mind that is similar to the Kull in behavior and temper is Wagner's Kane - but unlike Kane Kull is not immortal and still has some faith in human kind.Only thing (same as with Solomon Kane collection) that only makes readers want more is that only about half of the stories are finished stories - others are either unnamed drafts or semi-finished works.Nevertheless great collection with some very nice illustrations.Highly recommended.